Cybermedlife - Therapeutic Actions Water Birth

Experience of water birth delivery in Iran. 📎

Abstract Title: Experience of water birth delivery in Iran. Abstract Source: Arch Iran Med. 2009 Sep;12(5):468-71. PMID: 19722768 Abstract Author(s): Shahla Chaichian, Ali Akhlaghi, Firouzeh Rousta, Mahboobeh Safavi Article Affiliation: Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Islamic Azad University, Tehran Medical Unit, Tehran, Iran. This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. Abstract: BACKGROUND: Having considered the physiologic challenges during pregnancy, scientists have searched for different delivery methods with minimal medical intervention. The use of water immersion by women for relaxing during labor is being used worldwide. We aimed to evaluate the controversies surrounding water birth and to find out the interest of Iranian women in this delivery method. METHODS: In a randomized clinical trial, 106 pregnant women were assigned to control and experimental groups. The experimental group underwent the labor and delivery in standardized warm water pools. The control group gave birth by conventional delivery method at the hospital. A questionnaire was completed during the labor for women in both control and experimental groups including the method of delivery; labor length; use of different drugs such as analgesics, opiates, antispasmodic, and oxytocin; use of episiotomy, and newborn's Apgar score and weight. RESULTS: Totally, 53 cases and 53 controls with the mean age of 26.4+/-5.9 and 27.1+/-5.9 years, respectively, completed the study. Women in the control group required oxytocin, antispasmodics, opiates, and analgesics more frequently than those in the experimental group (P<0.001). Meanwhile, the active phase and the third stage of labor were shorter experimental group by 72 and 1.3 minutes, respectively (P<0.004, and P<0.04). All the participants in the experimental group gave birth naturally, whereas only 79.2 Article Published Date : Sep 01, 2009

Effects of water birth on maternal and neonatal outcomes.

Abstract Title: Effects of water birth on maternal and neonatal outcomes. Abstract Source: Wien Klin Wochenschr. 2002 Jun 14;114(10-11):391-5. PMID: 12708093 Abstract Author(s): Klaus Bodner, Barbara Bodner-Adler, Franz Wierrani, Klaus Mayerhofer, Christian Fousek, Anton Niedermayr, Werner Grünberger Article Affiliation: Departments of Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Hospital Rudolfstiftung, Vienna, Austria. This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. Abstract: BACKGROUND: Our purpose was to assess benefits and possible disadvantages of water births and to compare maternal and neonatal outcomes with normal vaginal deliveries. METHODS: This case-controlled study was carried out between January 2000 and July 2001. A total of 140 women who wanted water births were enrolled into the study. Our analysis was restricted to a sample of women with a gestational age>37 weeks, a normal sized foetus, a reactive admission cardiotocography, drainage of clear amniotic fluid (if the membranes were already ruptured) and a pregnancy with cephalic presentation. Women with medical or obstetric risk factors were excluded. 140 controls were selected from the delivery database as the next parity-matched normal spontaneous vaginal delivery. RESULTS: A statistically significant lower rate of episiotomies (p = 0.0001) and vaginal trauma (p = 0.03) was detected in the group assigned to water birth, whereas the frequency of perineal tears and labial trauma remained similar in both groups (p>0.05). A statistically significant decrease in the use of medical analgesia (p = 0.0001) and oxytocin (p = 0.002) was observed in women who had water births. A trend towards a reduction of the length of the first stage of labour was only observed in primiparous women bearing in water, but this reduction did not reach statistically significance (p>0.05). Manual placenta removal (p = 0.017), severe postpartum haemorrhage (blood loss>500 ml; p = 0.002) and maternal infection rate (p = 0.03) were statistically significant lower in women who delivered in water. When analysing the postpartum haemoglobin, no statistically significant differences could be observed between the two groups (p>0.05). No statistically significant differences were detected for neonatal parameters (p>0.05) between women who had had water births and those choosing conventional vaginal delivery. Article Published Date : Jun 14, 2002

A retrospective comparison of water births and conventional vaginal deliveries.

Abstract Title: A retrospective comparison of water births and conventional vaginal deliveries. Abstract Source: Eur J Obstet Gynecol Reprod Biol. 2000 Jul;91(1):15-20. PMID: 10817872 Abstract Author(s): C M Otigbah, M K Dhanjal, G Harmsworth, T Chard Article Affiliation: Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Homerton Hospital, London, UK. Abstract: The aim of this study was to document the practice of water births and compare their outcome and safety with normal vaginal deliveries. A retrospective case-control study was conducted over a five year period from 1989 to 1994 at the Maternity Unit, Rochford Hospital, Southend, UK. Three hundred and one women electing for water births were compared with the same number of age and parity matched low risk women having conventional vaginal deliveries. Length of labour; analgesia requirements; apgar scores; maternal complications including perineal trauma, postpartum haemorrhages, infections; fetal and neonatal complications including shoulder dystocias; admissions to the Special Care Baby Unit, and infections were noted. Primigravidae having water births had shorter first and second stages of labour compared with controls (P<0.05 and P<0.005 respectively), reducing the total time spent in labour by 90 min (95% confidence interval 31 to 148). All women having water births had reduced analgesia requirements. No analgesia was required by 38% (95% confidence interval 23.5 to 36.3, P<0.0001) and 1.3% requested opiates compared to 56% of the controls (95% confidence interval 46. 3 to 58.1, P<0.0001). Primigravidae having water births had less perineal trauma (P<0.05). Overall the episiotomy rate was 5 times greater in the control group (95% confidence interval 15 to 26.2, P<0.0001), but more women having water births had perineal tears (95% confidence interval 6.6 to 22.6, P<0.001). There were twice as many third degree tears, post partum haemorrhages and admissions to the Special Care Baby Unit in the controls, although these differences were not significant. Apgar scores were comparable in both groups. There were no neonatal infections or neonatal deaths in the study. This study suffers from many of the methodological problems inherent in investigation of uncommon modes of delivery. However, we conclude that water births in low risk women delivered by experienced professionals are as safe as normal vaginal deliveries. Labouring and delivering in water is associated with a reduction in length of labour and perineal trauma for primigravidae, and a reduction in analgesia requirements for all women. Article Published Date : Jul 01, 2000
Therapeutic Actions Water Birth

NCBI pubmed

Pharmacological and Non-Pharmacological Methods of Labour Pain Relief-Establishment of Effectiveness and Comparison.

Related Articles Pharmacological and Non-Pharmacological Methods of Labour Pain Relief-Establishment of Effectiveness and Comparison. Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2018 Dec 09;15(12): Authors: Czech I, Fuchs P, Fuchs A, Lorek M, Tobolska-Lorek D, Drosdzol-Cop A, Sikora J Abstract Background: To evaluate the effectiveness of pharmacological and non-pharmacological pain relief methods and to compare them. Materials and methods: 258 women were included in the study and interviewed using a questionnaire and the visual analogue scale for pain. They were divided into six groups depending on chosen method of labour pain relief: epidural anaesthesia (EA; n = 42), water immersion and water birth (WB; n = 40), nitrous oxide gas for pain control (G; n = 40), transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) (n = 50), multiple management (MM; n = 42), none (N; n = 44). Results: The average age of the women was 29.4 ± 3.74 years and 60.47% of them were nulliparous (n = 156). Mean values of labour pain intensity were 6.81 ± 2.26 during the first stage of labour; 7.86 ± 2.06 during the second stage, and 3.22 ± 2.46 during the third stage. There was no significant difference in pain level between epidural analgesia and gas groups in the first stage of labour (p = 0.74). Nevertheless, epidural analgesia reduced pain level during the second and third stage (both p < 0.01). The highest satisfaction level pertains to water immersion (n = 38; 95%). Conclusion: Epidural analgesia is the gold standard of labour pain relief, however water birth was found to be associated with the highest satisfaction level of the parturient women. The contentment of childbirth depends not only on the level of experienced pain, but also on the care provided to the parturient during pregnancy and labour. PMID: 30544878 [PubMed - in process]

Quantitative and qualitative analysis of antimicrobial usage patterns in 180 selected farrow-to-finish pig farms from nine European countries based on single batch and purchase data.

Related Articles Quantitative and qualitative analysis of antimicrobial usage patterns in 180 selected farrow-to-finish pig farms from nine European countries based on single batch and purchase data. J Antimicrob Chemother. 2018 Dec 13;: Authors: Sarrazin S, Joosten P, Van Gompel L, Luiken REC, Mevius DJ, Wagenaar JA, Heederik DJJ, Dewulf J, EFFORT consortium Abstract Objectives: Farm-level quantification of antimicrobial usage (AMU) in pig farms. Methods: In a cross-sectional study, AMU data on group treatments administered to a single batch of fattening pigs from birth to slaughter (group treatment data) and antimicrobials purchased during 1 year (purchase data) were collected at 180 pig farms in nine European countries. AMU was quantified using treatment incidence (TI) based on defined (DDDvet) and used (UDDvet) daily doses and defined (DCDvet) and used (UCDvet) course doses. Results: The majority of antimicrobial group treatments were administered to weaners (69.5% of total TIDDDvet) followed by sucklers (22.5% of total TIDDDvet). AMU varied considerably between farms with a median TIDDDvet of 9.2 and 7.1 for a standardized rearing period of 200 days based on group treatment and purchase data, respectively. In general, UDDvet and UCDvet were higher than DDDvet and DCDvet, respectively, suggesting that either the defined doses were set too low or that group treatments were often dosed too high and/or administered for too long. Extended-spectrum penicillins (31.2%) and polymyxins (24.7%) were the active substances most often used in group treatments, with the majority administered through feed or water (82%). Higher AMU at a young age was associated with higher use in older pigs. Conclusions: Collecting farm-level AMU data of good quality is challenging and results differ based on how data are collected (group treatment data versus purchase data) and reported (defined versus used daily and course doses). PMID: 30544242 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

Dental Cleaning, Community Water Fluoridation and Preterm Birth, Massachusetts: 2009-2016.

Related Articles Dental Cleaning, Community Water Fluoridation and Preterm Birth, Massachusetts: 2009-2016. Matern Child Health J. 2018 Dec 12;: Authors: Zhang X, Lu E, Stone SL, Diop H Abstract Objectives Data on the potential effect of dental cleaning and community water fluoridation (CWF) on pregnancy outcomes are scarce. While numerous studies confirm the cost-effectiveness of fluoride in preventing dental caries, the benefit of CWF during pregnancy has not been well established. Methods This cross-sectional study used data from 2009 to 2016 Massachusetts Pregnancy Risk Assessment Monitoring System and restricted to singleton live births (n = 9234, weighted response rate = 64.3%). Our exposures were: (1) dental cleaning alone during pregnancy; (2) CWF alone; and (3) dental cleaning and CWF combined (DC-CWF). Women without dental cleaning during pregnancy and CWF comprised our reference group. The outcome was preterm birth, (birth < 37 weeks gestation). This study used multivariate logistic regression modeling, controlling for maternal sociodemographic characteristics, previous medical risk and behavioral factors, and calculated adjusted risk ratios (aRRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Results During 2009-2016, the prevalence of preterm birth among women with a singleton live birth was 8.5% in Massachusetts. Overall, 58.7% of women had dental cleaning during pregnancy, and 63.6% lived in CWF. After adjusting for potential confounders, the associations between dental cleaning alone and preterm birth (aRR = 0.74 [95% CI 0.55-0.98]), and DC-CWF and preterm birth (aRR = 0.74 [95% CI 0.57-0.95]) were significant, while the association between CWF alone and preterm birth was not significant (aRR = 0.81 [95% CI 0.63-1.05]), compared to women without dental cleaning and CWF. Conclusions for Practice This study shows that the prevalence of preterm birth was lower among women with DC only and DC-CWF. PMID: 30542985 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

Are health facilities well equipped to provide basic quality childbirth services under the free maternal health policy? Findings from rural Northern Ghana.

Related Articles Are health facilities well equipped to provide basic quality childbirth services under the free maternal health policy? Findings from rural Northern Ghana. BMC Health Serv Res. 2018 Dec 12;18(1):959 Authors: Dalinjong PA, Wang AY, Homer CSE Abstract BACKGROUND: Basic inputs and infrastructure including drugs, supplies, equipment, water and electricity are required for the provision of quality care. In the era of the free maternal health policy in Ghana, it is unclear if such basic inputs are readily accessible in health facilities. The study aimed to assess the availability of basic inputs including drugs, supplies, equipment and emergency transport in health facilities. Women and health providers' views on privacy and satisfaction with quality of care were also assessed. METHODS: The study used a convergent parallel mixed methods in one rural municipality in Ghana, Kassena-Nankana. A survey among facilities (n = 14) was done. Another survey was carried out among women who gave birth in health facilities only (n = 353). A qualitative component involved focus group discussions (FGDs) with women (n = 10) and in-depth interviews (IDIs) with midwives and nurses (n = 25). Data were analysed using descriptive statistics for the quantitative study, while the qualitative data were recorded, transcribed, read and coded using themes. RESULTS: The survey showed that only two (14%) out of fourteen facilities had clean water, and five (36%) had electricity. Emergency transport for referrals was available in only one (7%) facility. Basic drugs, supplies, equipment and infrastructure especially physical space were inadequate. Rooms used for childbirth in some facilities were small and used for multiple purposes. Eighty-nine percent (n = 314) of women reported lack of privacy during childbirth and this was confirmed in the IDIs. Despite this, 77% of women (n = 272) were very satisfied or satisfied with quality of care for childbirth which was supported in the FGDs. Reasons for women's satisfaction included the availability of midwives to provide childbirth services and to have follow-up homes visits. Some midwives were seen to be patient and empathetic. Providers were not satisfied due to health system challenges. CONCLUSION: Government should dedicate more resources to the provision of essential inputs for CHPS compounds providing maternal health services. Health management committees should also endeavour to play an active role in the management of health facilities to ensure efficiency and accountability. These would improve quality service provision and usage, helping to achieve universal health coverage. PMID: 30541529 [PubMed - in process]
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