Therapeutic Actions Water Birth

NCBI pubmed

High-Dose Perinatal Folic-Acid Supplementation Alters Insulin Sensitivity in Sprague-Dawley Rats and Diminishes the Expression of Adiponectin.

High-Dose Perinatal Folic-Acid Supplementation Alters Insulin Sensitivity in Sprague-Dawley Rats and Diminishes the Expression of Adiponectin. J Diet Suppl. 2018 Feb 16;:1-13 Authors: Morakinyo AO, Samuel TA, Awobajo FO, Oludare GO, Mofolorunso A Abstract The possible intake of folate in excess of the recommended upper levels is a matter of critical importance. This study was conducted to investigate the effects of prenatal and postnatal high folic acid supplementation (FAS) on glucose tolerance, insulin sensitivity, lipid metabolism, and expression of adiponectin in rats. The study included 20 female rats divided into two groups: control group and FAS group (receiving high folic acid supplemented diet). Both groups of female rats were mated and pregnancy confirmed. At parturition, the diet of 5 dams that were fed with control diet during gestation and their litters was changed to FAS diet and continued throughout lactation. Similarly, half of the dams that were previously fed with FAS diet during gestation and their litters were also changed to control diet. The remaining 5 dams in each group continued on their respective diets throughout lactation with their litters. Other dams remained on their respective diets throughout lactation. Food and water intake, body weight, lipid concentrations, insulin, and the expression of adiponectin were determined. Glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity were also measured to evaluate glucose homeostasis. FAS significantly increased the postweaning food, water intake, triglyceride, and insulin levels but diminished insulin sensitivity in adult offspring. The expression of adiponectin in insulin-sensitive tissues was also significantly decreased and these were consistent with insulin resistance of FAS offspring. High-dose FAS may promote insulin resistance and dyslipidemia and disrupt glucose metabolism possibly by depressing adiponectin expression. Although this is an animal model and the effects of the diets cannot be directly transposed to humans, this study provides indications of the possible adverse effects of FAS maternal diet on glucose metabolism in the offspring. PMID: 29451831 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]