Therapeutic Actions Spiritual Beliefs

NCBI pubmed

Centrality of spirituality/religion in the culture of palliative care service in Indonesia: An ethnographic study.

Related Articles Centrality of spirituality/religion in the culture of palliative care service in Indonesia: An ethnographic study. Nurs Health Sci. 2018 Jan 16;: Authors: Rochmawati E, Wiechula R, Cameron K Abstract Experiencing life-threatening illness could impact on an individual's spirituality or religious beliefs. In this paper, we report on a study which explored cultural elements that influence the provision of palliative care for people with cancer. A contemporary ethnographic approach was adopted. Observations and interviews were undertaken over 3 months with 48 participants, including palliative care staff, patients, and their families. An ethnographic data analysis framework was adopted to assist in the analysis of data at item, pattern, and structural levels. Religion was identified as central to everyday life, with all participants reporting being affiliated to particular religions and performing their religious practices in their daily lives. Patients' relatives acknowledged and addressed patients' needs for these practices. Staff provided spiritual care for the patients and their relatives in the form of religious discussion and conducting prayers together. An understanding that religious and spiritual practices are integral cultural elements and of fundamental importance to the holistic health of their patients is necessary if health-care professionals are to support patients and their families in end-of-life care. PMID: 29336107 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

Perceptions of Mindfulness in a Low-income, Primarily African American Treatment-Seeking Sample.

Related Articles Perceptions of Mindfulness in a Low-income, Primarily African American Treatment-Seeking Sample. Mindfulness (N Y). 2017 Dec;8(6):1532-1543 Authors: Spears CA, Houchins SC, Bamatter WP, Barrueco S, Hoover DS, Perskaudas R Abstract Individuals with low socioeconomic status (SES) and members of racial/ethnic minority groups often experience profound disparities in mental health and physical well-being. Mindfulness-based interventions show promise for improving mood and health behaviors in higher-SES and non-Latino White populations. However, research is needed to explore what types of adaptations, if any, are needed to best support underserved populations. This study used qualitative methods to gain information about a) perceptions of mindfulness, b) experiences with meditation, c) barriers to practicing mindfulness, and d) recommendations for tailoring mindfulness-based interventions in a low-income, primarily African American treatment-seeking sample. Eight focus groups were conducted with 32 adults (16 men and 16 women) currently receiving services at a community mental health center. Most participants (91%) were African American. Focus group data were transcribed and analyzed using NVivo 10. A team of coders reviewed the transcripts to identify salient themes. Relevant themes included beliefs that mindfulness practice might improve mental health (e.g., managing stress and anger more effectively) and physical health (e.g., improving sleep and chronic pain, promoting healthier behaviors). Participants also discussed ways in which mindfulness might be consistent with, and even enhance, their religious and spiritual practices. Results could be helpful in tailoring mindfulness-based treatments to optimize feasibility and effectiveness for low-SES adults receiving mental health services. PMID: 29333200 [PubMed]

Canadian Licensing Changes and the Anticipated Impact on Islamic Spiritual Care and Counseling Practice in Ontario.

Related Articles Canadian Licensing Changes and the Anticipated Impact on Islamic Spiritual Care and Counseling Practice in Ontario. J Pastoral Care Counsel. 2014 Sep;68(3):1-9 Authors: Isgandarova N Abstract This article highlights some significant aspects of the new regulations and the benefits of the College of Registered Psychotherapists and Registered Mental Health Therapists of Ontario (CRPO) with regard to the spiritual care and counseling practice of Muslim spiritual caregivers, including imams. PMID: 26162146 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]