Cybermedlife - Therapeutic Actions Chiropractic Treatment Cervical Manipulation

Subclinical neck pain and the effects of cervical manipulation on elbow joint position sense.

Abstract Title: Subclinical neck pain and the effects of cervical manipulation on elbow joint position sense. Abstract Source: J Manipulative Physiol Ther. 2011 Feb ;34(2):88-97. PMID: 21334540 Abstract Author(s): Heidi Haavik, Bernadette Murphy Article Affiliation: New Zealand College of Chiropractic, Auckland, New Zealand. This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. Abstract: OBJECTIVE: The objectives of this study were to investigate whether elbow joint position sense (JPS) accuracy differs between participants with a history of subclinical neck pain (SCNP) and those with no neck complaints and to determine whether adjusting dysfunctional cervical segments in the SCNP group improves their JPS accuracy. METHOD: Twenty-five SCNP participants and 18 control participants took part in this pre-post experimental study. Elbow JPS was measured using an electrogoniometer (MLTS700, ADInstruments, New Zealand). Participants reproduced a previously presented angle of the elbow joint with their neck in 4 positions: neutral, flexion, rotation, and combined flexion/rotation. The experimental intervention was high-velocity, low-amplitude cervical adjustments, and the control intervention was a 5-minute rest period. Group JPS data were compared, and it was assessed pre and post interventions using 3 parameters: absolute, constant, and variable errors. RESULTS: At baseline, the control group was significantly better at reproducing the elbow target angle. The SCNP group's absolute error significantly improved after the cervical adjustments when the participants' heads were in the neutral and left-rotation positions. They displayed a significant overall decrease in variable error after the cervical adjustments. The control group participants' JPS accuracy was worse after the control intervention, with a significant overall effect in absolute and variable errors. No other significant effects were detected. CONCLUSION: These results suggest that asymptomatic people with a history of SCNP have reduced elbow JPS accuracy compared to those with no history of any neck complaints. Furthermore, the results suggest that adjusting dysfunctional cervical segments in people with SCNP can improve their upper limb JPS accuracy. Article Published Date : Feb 01, 2011
Therapeutic Actions Chiropractic Treatment Cervical Manipulation

NCBI pubmed

Non-surgical improvement of cervical lordosis is possible in advanced spinal osteoarthritis: a CBP® case report.

Non-surgical improvement of cervical lordosis is possible in advanced spinal osteoarthritis: a CBP® case report. J Phys Ther Sci. 2018 Jan;30(1):108-112 Authors: Fortner MO, Oakley PA, Harrison DE Abstract [Purpose] To present a case of the non-surgical improvement in cervical kyphosis in a patient with history of cervical spine trauma and advanced osteoarthritis. [Subject and Methods] A 38 year old male presented with a chief complaint of chronic neck pain that was not substantially relieved by recent previous traditional physiotherapy and chiropractic manipulation. The cervical radiograph demonstrated a cervical hypolordosis of 5° as measured by the Harrison posterior tangent method from C2-C7. There was a 15° kyphosis at C4-C6 with advanced degenerative changes consistent with previous spine trauma. The patient was treated by CBP® methods incorporating cervical extension traction, extension exercises, and spinal manipulation for 30 sessions over an 18 week period. [Results] After the treatment sessions, there was a substantial (27°) increase in global C2-C7 lordosis, and 5° decrease in C4-C6 degenerative kyphosis corresponding to the reduction in neck pain and disability, and an improvement in overall health status as indicated on the SF-36 health questionnaire. [Conclusion] Although degenerative spondylosis of the cervical spine will have physical limitations to non-surgical correction, this case serves as an example that it is possible to reduce degenerative kyphosis and increase global cervical lordosis corresponding to health improvements in these patients. PMID: 29410577 [PubMed]