Therapeutic Actions Thermography

NCBI pubmed

Intraosseous Temperature Changes During Implant Site Preparation: In Vitro Comparison of Thermocouples and Infrared Thermography.

Intraosseous Temperature Changes During Implant Site Preparation: In Vitro Comparison of Thermocouples and Infrared Thermography. Int J Oral Maxillofac Implants. 2018 Jan/Feb;33(1):72-78 Authors: Harder S, Egert C, Freitag-Wolf S, Mehl C, Kern M Abstract PURPOSE: Implant-supported dental prostheses are based on the principle of osseointegration, and the success of dental implantation depends on adequate formation of this intimate bone-to-implant contact. The application of heat during the drilling procedure leads to a rise in intraosseous temperature at the prospective implant site, which may result in various complications. The purpose of the present study was to compare the ability of thermocouples and infrared thermography to detect changes in intraosseous temperature during dental implant site preparation. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Standardized bovine costae bone blocks were used to simulate the cortical bone of the human mandible. Steel implant form drills with a diameter of 3.0 mm were used. Two types of irrigation systems were used (external cooling only and combined internal and external cooling). Drilling was performed at a constant speed (1,200 rpm). Changes in intraosseous temperature were evaluated using Type T Cu-CuNi thermocouples and an infrared thermography camera system at contact pressures of 5 and 20 N. RESULTS: Infrared thermography detected significantly greater increases in intraosseous temperature (ΔT) than thermocouples for all tested combinations of cooling system and contact pressure (P ≤ .0001). CONCLUSION: These results suggest that thermography more accurately reflects intraosseous temperature changes during implant site preparation than thermocouples. PMID: 29340345 [PubMed - in process]

Non-Isothermal Spreading Dynamics of Self-Rewetting Droplets.

Related Articles Non-Isothermal Spreading Dynamics of Self-Rewetting Droplets. Langmuir. 2018 Jan 16;: Authors: Mamalis D, Koutsos V, Sefiane K Abstract We experimentally studied the spreading dynamics of binary alcohol mixtures (and pure liquids for reference) deposited on a heated substrate in a partially wetting situation, under non-isothermal conditions. We show that the spreading mechanism of an evaporating droplet exhibits a power law growth with early-stage exponents that depend strongly and non-monotonically on substrate temperature. Moreover, we investigated the temporal and spatial thermal dynamics in the droplet using infrared thermography revealing the existence of unique thermal patterns due to thermal and/or solutal instabilities which lead to surface tension gradients, namely Marangoni effect. Our key findings are that the temperature of the substrate drastically affects the early-stage inertial-capillary spreading regime owing to the non-monotonic surface tension/temperature dependence of the self-rewetting liquids. At later stages of wetting, the spreading dynamics enters the viscous-capillary dominated regime with the characteristic low kinetics mirroring the behaviour of pure liquids. PMID: 29336567 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

Ischemic compression and kinesiotherapy on chronic myofascial pain in breast cancer survivors.

Related Articles Ischemic compression and kinesiotherapy on chronic myofascial pain in breast cancer survivors. J Bodyw Mov Ther. 2018 Jan;22(1):69-75 Authors: Rangon FB, Koga Ferreira VT, Rezende MS, Apolinário A, Ferro AP, Guirro ECO Abstract OBJECTIVE: assess the effects of ischemic compression and kinesiotherapy on the rehabilitation of breast cancer survivors with chronic myofascial pain. METHODS: A randomized, controlled, blinded clinical trial was performed with 20 breast cancer survivors with myofascial trigger point in the upper trapezius muscle. Patients were randomly allocated to ischemic compression + kinesiotherapy (G1, n = 10) and kinesiotherapy (G2, n = 10). Both groups were submitted to 10 sessions of treatment. The variables evaluated were: Numeric Rating Scale, Pain Related Self-Statement Scale, pressure pain threshold, Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Breast and Infrared thermography. RESULTS: A significant reduction (p < 0.05) was observed in pain intensity after 10 sessions in Groups 1 and 2, a significant increase (p < 0.05) in pressure pain threshold in both the operated and non-operated side after 10 sessions for Group 1. CONCLUSION: Ischemic compression associated with kinesiotherapy increases the pressure pain threshold on the myofascial trigger point in the upper trapezius muscle and reduces the intensity of pain in breast cancer survivors with myofascial pain. PMID: 29332760 [PubMed - in process]

Is Kinesio Taping to Generate Skin Convolutions Effective for Increasing Local Blood Circulation?

Related Articles Is Kinesio Taping to Generate Skin Convolutions Effective for Increasing Local Blood Circulation? Med Sci Monit. 2018 Jan 14;24:288-293 Authors: Yang JM, Lee JH Abstract BACKGROUND It is unclear whether traditional application of Kinesio taping, which produces wrinkles in the skin, is effective for improving blood circulation. This study investigated local skin temperature changes after the application of an elastic therapeutic tape using convolution and non-convolution taping methods (CTM/NCTM). MATERIAL AND METHODS Twenty-eight pain-free men underwent CTM and NCTM randomly applied to the right and left sides of the lower back. Using infrared thermography, skin temperature was measured before, immediately after application, 5 min later, 15 min later, and after the removal of the tape. RESULTS Both CTM and NCTM showed a slight, but significant, decrease in skin temperature for up to 5 min. The skin temperature at 15 min and after the removal of the tape was not significantly different from the initial temperature for CTM and NCTM. There were also no significant differences in the skin temperatures between CTM and NCTM. CONCLUSIONS Our findings do not support a therapeutic effect of wrinkling the skin with elastic tape application as a technique to increase local blood flow. PMID: 29332101 [PubMed - in process]

An IR Sensor Based Smart System to Approximate Core Body Temperature.

Related Articles An IR Sensor Based Smart System to Approximate Core Body Temperature. J Med Syst. 2017 Aug;41(8):123 Authors: Ray PP Abstract Herein demonstrated experiment studies two methods, namely convection and body resistance, to approximate human core body temperature. The proposed system is highly energy efficient that consumes only 165 mW power and runs on 5 VDC source. The implemented solution employs an IR thermographic sensor of industry grade along with AT Mega 328 breakout board. Ordinarily, the IR sensor is placed 1.5-30 cm away from human forehead (i.e., non-invasive) and measured the raw data in terms of skin and ambient temperature which is then converted using appropriate approximation formula to find out core body temperature. The raw data is plotted, visualized, and stored instantaneously in a local machine by means of two tools such as Makerplot, and JAVA-JAR. The test is performed when human object is in complete rest and after 10 min of walk. Achieved results are compared with the CoreTemp CM-210 sensor (by Terumo, Japan) which is calculated to be 0.7 °F different from the average value of BCT, obtained by the proposed IR sensor system. Upon a slight modification, the presented model can be connected with a remotely placed Internet of Things cloud service, which may be useful to inform and predict the user's core body temperature through a probabilistic view. It is also comprehended that such system can be useful as wearable device to be worn on at the hat attachable way. PMID: 28695440 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

3D MR thermometry of frozen tissue: Feasibility and accuracy during cryoablation at 3T.

Related Articles 3D MR thermometry of frozen tissue: Feasibility and accuracy during cryoablation at 3T. J Magn Reson Imaging. 2016 Dec;44(6):1572-1579 Authors: Overduin CG, Fütterer JJ, Scheenen TW Abstract PURPOSE: To assess the feasibility and accuracy of 3D ultrashort echo time (UTE) magnetic resonance (MR) thermometry of frozen tissue during cryoablation on a clinical 3T MR system. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Ex vivo porcine muscle specimens (n = 4) were imaged during two cycles of 10:3 minutes freeze-thaw on a 3T clinical MR scanner. Continuous MR monitoring was performed using a 3D radial ramp-sampled UTE sequence with a shortest TE of 70 μs. Fiber optic sensors were used for temperature reference. Data of three experiments were used as reference sets. Signal intensity values were normalized to baseline before cooling and related to temperature. Data for subzero temperatures were fit to a monoexponential function. In the separate validation set, the obtained fit was used to generate 3D MR temperature maps of frozen tissue at each imaging timepoint. Statistical analysis was performed to assess accuracy of the MR temperature maps. RESULTS: With 3D UTE imaging, MR signal was measured from frozen tissue down to temperatures as low as -40°C. Temperatures predicted from the MR temperature maps strongly correlated with sensor recorded values (r = 0.977, P < 0.001). Bland-Altman analysis demonstrated a mean difference between MR-estimated temperatures and sensor readings of -1.2 ± 2.7°C with upper and lower limits of agreement of +4.1 and -6.5°C, respectively. CONCLUSION: 3D MR thermometry of frozen tissue using UTE signal intensity was feasible during cryoablation on a clinical 3T MR system. Down to temperatures as low as -40°C, accuracy of the MR temperature maps was within clinically acceptable limits. J. Magn. Reson. Imaging 2016;44:1572-1579. PMID: 27160336 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]