Therapeutic Actions Home Birth

NCBI pubmed

There Is No Place Like Home: Imitation and the Politics of Recognition in Bolivian Obstetric Care.

Related Articles There Is No Place Like Home: Imitation and the Politics of Recognition in Bolivian Obstetric Care. Med Anthropol Q. 2018 Jan 17;: Authors: Morales GE Abstract This article examines how efforts to "culturally adapt" birthing spaces in a rural Bolivian hospital are generating debates among doctors about what constitutes proper obstetric care. Working at the intersection of national and transnational projects, NGOs in Bolivia have remade the birthing rooms of some public health institutions to look more like a home, with the goal of making indigenous women feel more comfortable and encouraging them to come to the clinic to give birth. Yet narratives of transformation also obscure ongoing conditions of racial and gendered inequality in health services. I demonstrate how doctors' use of culturally adapted technologies enacts shifting affective relations-warm, cold, gentle, harsh-that draws on preoccupations with indigenous culture as a threat to maternal and infant life. In tracing practices of care, I argue that culturally adapted birthing in many ways extends historically rooted practices of doing biomedical work on indigenous bodies. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. PMID: 29344977 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

Factors Affecting the Place of Delivery among Mothers Residing in Jhorahat VDC, Morang, Nepal.

Related Articles Factors Affecting the Place of Delivery among Mothers Residing in Jhorahat VDC, Morang, Nepal. Int J Community Based Nurs Midwifery. 2018 Jan;6(1):2-11 Authors: Dhakal P, Shrestha M, Baral D, Pathak S Abstract Background: In Nepal, the maternal mortality ratio is 281 per thousand live births, among which 40% mortality occurs during home delivery. Home delivery increases the risk of maternal and neonatal mortality and morbidity due to the birth not assisted by skilled attendant. This study was carried out to determine the factors affecting the place of delivery among the mothers residing in Jhorahat VDC, Morang district, Nepal. Methods: A mixed method study using interviews based on semi-structured questionnaire (n=93) among mothers and two focus group discussion among decision makers of the house and female community health volunteers was conducted between November to December 2012. For quantitative data, Chi-square test and Fischer's Exact test were used to examine the association between the selected variables and place of delivery. Results: More than half (58.1%) of the mothers had institutional delivery and 41.9% of them had home delivery. The most common reason for home delivery was easy and convenient environment (66.7%) and that for institutional delivery was safety (77.8%). There was a significant association between caste, education of mothers, education of spouse, occupation of spouse, per capita income, time to reach the nearest health center, parity, previous place of delivery, number of antenatal visit, knowledge about place of delivery, planned place of delivery, and place of delivery. Conclusion: Maternal health services, such as prenatal care, skilled assistance during delivery and post-natal care, along with adequately equipped health institutions, play a major role in the reduction of maternal morbidity and mortality. Concerted efforts should be made both at community and government levels to increase institutional delivery. PMID: 29344531 [PubMed]