Cybermedlife - Therapeutic Actions Dietary Modification - Low Carbohydrate-High Protein

The effects of high-protein, low-carbohydrate diet on body weight and the expression of gastrointestinal hormones in diet-induced obesity rat

Abstract Title: [The effects of high-protein, low-carbohydrate diet on body weight and the expression of gastrointestinal hormones in diet-induced obesity rat]. Abstract Source: Zhonghua Yu Fang Yi Xue Za Zhi. 2011 Feb;45(2):132-5. PMID: 21426792 Abstract Author(s): Hai-yan Chen, Li-chuan Ma, Yin-yin Li, Jia-jun Zhao, Ming-long Li Article Affiliation: Department of Health-Care Endocrinology, Provincial Hospital Affiliated to Shandong University, Jinan 250021, China. Abstract: OBJECTIVE: To investigate the effects of long-term high-protein, low-carbohydrate diet on body weight and the expression of gastrointestinal hormones in diet-induced obesity rats. METHODS: Twenty-four diet-induced obesity rat models were established by feeding fat-enriched diet, then were randomly divided into two groups by stratified sampling method by weight: the high-protein diet group (HP, 36.7% of energy from protein), and the normal chow group (NC, 22.4% of energy from protein), 12 rats in each group. The total calorie intake of each rat per day was similar and was maintained for 24 weeks, then body weight, visceral fat mass, fasting plasma ghrelin and glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) were determined, as well as protein expression of ghrelin in stomach, GLP-1 in ileum were detected by immunohistochemistry. RESULTS: After 24 weeks, body weight of HP, NC groups were (490.92± 39.47) g and (545.55 ± 31.08) g, respectively (t = -3.664, P<0.01); visceral fat mass were (22.42± 7.04) g and (32.33 ± 9.27) g, respectively (t = -2.503, P<0.05); plasma ghrelin level were (2.36± 0.82) and (1.95 ± 0.64) ng/ml, respectively (t = 1.337, P>0.05), and plasma ghrelin level was negatively correlated to body weight (r = -0.370, t = -1.899, P<0.05), visceral fat mass (r = -0.454, t = -2.52, P<0.01); plasma GLP-1 concentration were (0.52± 0.13) and (0.71 ± 0.19) ng/ml, respectively(t = -2.758, P<0.05); ghrelin protein expression in stomach were 25 473± 8701 and 10 526 ± 6194, respectively (t = 2.501, P<0.05); GLP-1 protein expression in ileum were 27 431± 5813 and 36 601 ± 5083, respectively (t = -1.833, P = 0.081). CONCLUSION: Long-term isocaloric high-protein, low-carbohydrate diet can reduce body weight and visceral fat, increase the expression of ghrelin, and decline GLP-1 expression in diet-induced obesity rats. Article Published Date : Feb 01, 2011
Therapeutic Actions DIETARY MODIFICATION Low Carbohydrate-High Protein

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Overweight and diabetes prevention: is a low-carbohydrate-high-fat diet recommendable?

Related Articles Overweight and diabetes prevention: is a low-carbohydrate-high-fat diet recommendable? Eur J Nutr. 2018 Jun;57(4):1301-1312 Authors: Brouns F Abstract In the past, different types of diet with a generally low-carbohydrate content (< 50-< 20 g/day) have been promoted, for weight loss and diabetes, and the effectiveness of a very low dietary carbohydrate content has always been a matter of debate. A significant reduction in the amount of carbohydrates in the diet is usually accompanied by an increase in the amount of fat and to a lesser extent, also protein. Accordingly, using the term "low carb-high fat" (LCHF) diet is most appropriate. Low/very low intakes of carbohydrate food sources may impact on overall diet quality and long-term effects of such drastic diet changes remain at present unknown. This narrative review highlights recent metabolic and clinical outcomes of studies as well as practical feasibility of low LCHF diets. A few relevant observations are as follows: (1) any diet type resulting in reduced energy intake will result in weight loss and related favorable metabolic and functional changes; (2) short-term LCHF studies show both favorable and less desirable effects; (3) sustained adherence to a ketogenic LCHF diet appears to be difficult. A non-ketogenic diet supplying 100-150 g carbohydrate/day, under good control, may be more practical. (4) There is lack of data supporting long-term efficacy, safety and health benefits of LCHF diets. Any recommendation should be judged in this light. (5) Lifestyle intervention in people at high risk of developing type 2 diabetes, while maintaining a relative carbohydrate-rich diet, results in long-term prevention of progression to type 2 diabetes and is generally seen as safe. PMID: 29541907 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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