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Prophylactic nutritional modification of the incidence of diabetes in autoimmune non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice. 📎

Abstract Title: Prophylactic nutritional modification of the incidence of diabetes in autoimmune non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice. Abstract Source: Br J Nutr. 1993 Mar;69(2):597-607. PMID: 8490012 Abstract Author(s): J Hoorfar, K Buschard, F Dagnaes-Hansen Abstract: Experiments in rodent models of insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) suggest that destruction of pancreatic beta cells can be both initiated and inhibited by certain environmental factors such as dietary constituents. We studied nutritional impact of certain protein sources of natural-ingredient, non-purified (NP) rodent diet on diabetes incidence and insulitis severity in the spontaneous diabetic, non-obese diabetic (NOD) mouse. Long-term ad lib. feeding of diets containing wheat flour (800 g/kg), and to a lesser extent soya-bean meal (400 g/kg), were associated with relatively high diabetes incidence (65 and 45% respectively), whereas a diet based on hydrolysed casein (HC; 200 g/kg) as the only source of protein significantly (compared with the wheat-flour diet) inhibited expression of diabetes (22%). Feeding a hypo-allergenic soya-bean-protein hydrolysate resulted in diabetes incidence and insulitis severity similar to that of the soya-bean-meal-fed group. This may indicate that protein hydrolysis per se may not be necessary for dietary modification of diabetes in the NOD mouse. The window of vulnerability to diabetogenic diets was found to be between weaning and about 70 d of age. In the diabetic mice insulitis was less frequent in the HC-fed group when compared with those fed NP (P = 0.04), soybean meal (P = 0.03), soya-bean-protein hydrolysate (P = 0.012) or wheat flour (P = 0.0002). In the non-diabetic mice the wheat-flour diet was associated with a high insulitis severity in comparison with the HC group (P = 0.004). Early avoidance of NP diet was associated with lower degree of insulitis in both diabetic (P = 0.00003) and non-diabetic mice (P = 0.001) when compared with the mice fed on the HC diet later in life. These findings are contributing to further clarification of diabetes-promoting dietary constituents, which may have some nutritional implications for IDDM-susceptible children. Article Published Date : Mar 01, 1993
Therapeutic Actions DIETARY MODIFICATION Soy Free

NCBI pubmed

Comprehensive Nutritional and Dietary Intervention for Autism Spectrum Disorder-A Randomized, Controlled 12-Month Trial.

Related Articles Comprehensive Nutritional and Dietary Intervention for Autism Spectrum Disorder-A Randomized, Controlled 12-Month Trial. Nutrients. 2018 Mar 17;10(3): Authors: Adams JB, Audhya T, Geis E, Gehn E, Fimbres V, Pollard EL, Mitchell J, Ingram J, Hellmers R, Laake D, Matthews JS, Li K, Naviaux JC, Naviaux RK, Adams RL, Coleman DM, Quig DW Abstract This study involved a randomized, controlled, single-blind 12-month treatment study of a comprehensive nutritional and dietary intervention. Participants were 67 children and adults with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) ages 3-58 years from Arizona and 50 non-sibling neurotypical controls of similar age and gender. Treatment began with a special vitamin/mineral supplement, and additional treatments were added sequentially, including essential fatty acids, Epsom salt baths, carnitine, digestive enzymes, and a healthy gluten-free, casein-free, soy-free (HGCSF) diet. There was a significant improvement in nonverbal intellectual ability in the treatment group compared to the non-treatment group (+6.7 ± 11 IQ points vs. -0.6 ± 11 IQ points, p = 0.009) based on a blinded clinical assessment. Based on semi-blinded assessment, the treatment group, compared to the non-treatment group, had significantly greater improvement in autism symptoms and developmental age. The treatment group had significantly greater increases in EPA, DHA, carnitine, and vitamins A, B2, B5, B6, B12, folic acid, and Coenzyme Q10. The positive results of this study suggest that a comprehensive nutritional and dietary intervention is effective at improving nutritional status, non-verbal IQ, autism symptoms, and other symptoms in most individuals with ASD. Parents reported that the vitamin/mineral supplements, essential fatty acids, and HGCSF diet were the most beneficial. PMID: 29562612 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Variations in diet cause alterations in microbiota and metabolites that follow changes in disease severity in a multiple sclerosis model.

Related Articles Variations in diet cause alterations in microbiota and metabolites that follow changes in disease severity in a multiple sclerosis model. Benef Microbes. 2018 Apr 25;9(3):495-513 Authors: Libbey JE, Sanchez JM, Doty DJ, Sim JT, Cusick MF, Cox JE, Fischer KF, Round JL, Fujinami RS Abstract Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a metabolically demanding disease involving immune-mediated destruction of myelin in the central nervous system. We previously demonstrated a significant alteration in disease course in the experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) preclinical model of MS due to diet. Based on the established crosstalk between metabolism and gut microbiota, we took an unbiased sampling of microbiota, in the stool, and metabolites, in the serum and stool, from mice (Mus musculus) on the two different diets, the Teklad global soy protein-free extruded rodent diet (irradiated diet) and the Teklad sterilisable rodent diet (autoclaved diet). Within the microbiota, the genus Lactobacillus was found to be inversely correlated with EAE severity. Therapeutic treatment with Lactobacillus paracasei resulted in a significant reduction in the incidence of disease, clinical scores and the amount of weight loss in EAE mice. Within the metabolites, we identified shifts in glycolysis and the tricarboxylic acid cycle that may explain the differences in disease severity between the different diets in EAE. This work begins to elucidate the relationship between diet, microbiota and metabolism in the EAE preclinical model of MS and identifies targets for further study with the goal to more specifically probe the complex metabolic interaction at play in EAE that may have translational relevance to MS patients. PMID: 29380645 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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