Therapeutic Actions Lifestyle Changes - Positive

NCBI pubmed

Intervention for childhood obesity based on parents only or parents and child compared with follow-up alone.

Related Articles Intervention for childhood obesity based on parents only or parents and child compared with follow-up alone. Pediatr Obes. 2018 Jan 17;: Authors: Yackobovitch-Gavan M, Wolf Linhard D, Nagelberg N, Poraz I, Shalitin S, Phillip M, Meyerovitch J Abstract OBJECTIVES: The study aims to assess the effects of family-based interventions targeted to parents only or to parents-and-child for the prevention and treatment of childhood obesity. METHOD: An open-label randomized study was conducted in 247 children (166 girls, 5-11 years) with body mass index (BMI) in the 85-98th percentile. Participants were allocated to three groups: parents-only (n = 89), parents-and-child (n = 84) and follow-up alone (n = 74). The intervention consisted of 12 once-weekly meetings with a dietician and psychologist. All children were followed for 2 years. Changes in anthropometric, clinical and lifestyle outcomes were assessed. RESULTS: The 3-month intervention was completed by 58 (65.2%) in the parents-only, 61 (72.6%) in the parents-child and 49 (66.2%) in the control group (P = .554). BMI-standard deviation score (SDS) decreased from baseline to 3 months in both intervention groups (parents-only: from 1.74 ± 0.31 to 1.66 ± 0.36, P < .001; parents-child, 1.83 ± 0.33 to 1.76 ± 0.36, P = .012), with no significant change in the controls (1.73 ± 0.32 to 1.70 ± 0.31, P = .301). The 2-year follow-up was completed by 45 in each of the intervention groups (50.5% and 53.5%, respectively) and 37 controls (50%) (P = .896). Compared with baseline, only the parents-child group showed a significant decrease in BMI-SDS (1.56 ± 0.46, P = .006). The rate of children who met the criteria for metabolic syndrome tended to drop from 6.0% at baseline (14/232) to 1.5% at 3 months (12/137) (P = .109), with no significant between-group differences in the rate of metabolic syndrome at baseline or at completion of the intervention. CONCLUSIONS: An intervention programme that focuses on both parents and children was found to have positive short-term and long-term effects on BMI-SDS. PMID: 29345113 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

Impact of body composition changes on risk of all-cause mortality in older adults.

Related Articles Impact of body composition changes on risk of all-cause mortality in older adults. Clin Nutr. 2016 Dec;35(6):1499-1505 Authors: Graf CE, Herrmann FR, Spoerri A, Makhlouf AM, Sørensen TIA, Ho S, Karsegard VL, Genton L Abstract PURPOSE: This study evaluates the relationship between body mass index (BMI), fat mass index (FMI) and fat-free mass index (FFMI) changes and mortality in persons ≥65 years. METHODS: Adults ≥65 years with at least two body composition measurements (BCM) between 1990 and 2011 were included. We excluded persons who died within one month of the second BCM and who had two single BCM in a one-month timeframe. Mortality data was retrieved until December 2012. For each person, we calculated the regression slopes for BMI, FMI and FFMI changes. Significant positive slopes were categorized as "gain", negative slopes as "loss" and the others as "maintenance". The impact of body composition changes was evaluated by Cox regression models while adjusting for sex, age, co-morbidities and body composition at the last measurement. RESULTS: We included 791 persons with 3049 BCM. After adjustment for sex, and age and co-morbidities, a loss of FFMI, but not of FMI or BMI, increased the risk of mortality (HR 2.02, 95%CI 1.28-3.19). The prediction of mortality with FFMI loss remained significant when further adjusting for FMI loss and the last available body composition (HR 1.68, 95%CI 1.04-2.70). CONCLUSIONS: FFMI loss is related to increased mortality in older persons. PMID: 27126709 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]