CYBERMED LIFE - ORGANIC  & NATURAL LIVING

Cybermedlife - Therapeutic Actions Reiki Therapy

Reiki Is Better Than Placebo and Has Broad Potential as a Complementary Health Therapy. 📎

Abstract Title: Reiki Is Better Than Placebo and Has Broad Potential as a Complementary Health Therapy. Abstract Source: J Evid Based Complementary Altern Med. 2017 Jan 1:2156587217728644. Epub 2017 Jan 1. PMID: 28874060 Abstract Author(s): David E McManus Article Affiliation: David E McManus Abstract: This study reviews the available clinical studies of Reiki to determine whether there is evidence for Reiki providing more than just a placebo effect. The available English-language literature of Reiki was reviewed, specifically for peer-reviewed clinical studies with more than 20 participants in the Reiki treatment arm, controlling for a placebo effect. Of the 13 suitable studies, 8 demonstrated Reiki being more effective than placebo, 4 found no difference but had questionable statistical resolving power, and only one provided clear evidence for not providing benefit. Viewed collectively, these studies provide reasonably strong support for Reiki being more effective than placebo. From the information currently available, Reiki is a safe and gentle"complementary"therapy that activates the parasympathetic nervous system to heal body and mind. It has potential for broader use in management of chronic health conditions, and possibly in postoperative recovery. Research is needed to optimize the delivery of Reiki. Article Published Date : Dec 31, 2016

Massage and Reiki used to reduce stress and anxiety: Randomized Clinical Trial. 📎

Abstract Title: Massage and Reiki used to reduce stress and anxiety: Randomized Clinical Trial. Abstract Source: Rev Lat Am Enfermagem. 2016 Nov 28 ;24:e2834. Epub 2016 Nov 28. PMID: 27901219 Abstract Author(s): Leonice Fumiko Sato Kurebayashi, Ruth Natalia Teresa Turrini, Talita Pavarini Borges de Souza, Raymond Sehiji Takiguchi, Gisele Kuba, Marisa Toshi Nagumo Article Affiliation: Leonice Fumiko Sato Kurebayashi Abstract: Objective:: to evaluate the effectiveness of massage and reiki in the reduction of stress and anxiety in clients at the Institute for Integrated and Oriental Therapy in Sao Paulo (Brazil). Method:: clinical tests randomly done in parallel with an initial sample of 122 people divided into three groups: Massage + Rest (G1), Massage + Reiki (G2) and a Control group without intervention (G3). The Stress Systems list and the Trace State Anxiety Inventory were used to evaluate the groups at the start and after 8 sessions (1 month), during 2015. Results:: there were statistical differences (p = 0.000) according to the ANOVA (Analysis of Variance) for the stress amongst the groups 2 and 3 (p = 0.014) with a 33% reductions and a Cohen of 0.78. In relation to anxiety-state, there was a reduction in the intervention groups compared with the control group (p<0.01) with a 21% reduction in group 2 (Cohen of 1.18) and a 16% reduction for group 1 (Cohen of 1.14). Conclusion:: Massage + Reiki produced better results amongst the groups and the conclusion is for further studies to be done with the use of a placebo group to evaluate the impact of the technique separate from other techniques. RBR-42c8wp. Objetivo:: avaliar a efetividade da Massagem e Reiki na redução de estresse e ansiedade em clientes do Instituto de Terapia Integrada e Oriental, em São Paulo (Brasil). Método:: ensaio clínico controlado randomizado paralelo com amostra inicial de 122 pessoas divididas em 3 grupos Massagem+Repouso (G1), Massagem+Reiki (G2) e Controle sem intervenção (G3). Foram avaliados pela Lista de Sintomas de Stress e pelo Inventário de Ansiedade Traço-Estado, no início e após 8 sessões(1 mês), durante o ano de 2015. Resultados:: houve diferença estatística (p = 0,000) segundo ANOVA para o estresse entre os grupos 2 e 3 (33% de redução e Cohen de 0,98) e entre os grupos 1 e 3 (p = 0,014), 24% de redução e Cohen de 0,78. Para a ansiedade-estado, houve redução nos grupos de intervenção comparados ao grupo Controle (p<0,01), com 21% de redução para o Grupo 2 (Cohen de 1,18) e 16% de redução para o grupo 1 (Cohen de 1,14). Conclusão:: a Massagem+Reiki conseguiu melhores resultados entre os grupos e se sugere outro estudo com uso de placebo para o Reiki, para avaliar o alcance da técnica em separado. RBR-42c8wp. Objetivo:: evaluar la efectividad de Masaje y Reiki para reducción del estrés y ansiedad en clientes del Instituto de Terapia Integrada y Oriental, en Sao Paulo, Brasil. Método:: ensayo clínico controlado aleatorizado paralelo, con muestra inicial de 122 personas divididas en 3 grupos Masaje+Reposo (G1), Masaje+Reiki (G2) y Control sin intervención (G3). Los participantes fueron evaluados a través de la Lista de Síntomas de Stress y por el Inventario de Ansiedad Rasgo-Estado, enel inicio y después de 8 sesiones (1 mes), durante el año de 2015. Resultados:: hubo diferencia estadística (p = 0,000) según ANOVA para el estrés entre los grupos 2 y 3 (33% de reducción y Cohen de 0,98) y entre los grupos 1 y 3 (p = 0,014), 24% de reducción y Cohen de 0,78. Para la ansiedad-estado, hubo reducción en los grupos de intervención comparados al grupo Control (p<0,01), con 21% de reducción para el Grupo 2 (Cohen de 1,18) y 16% de reducción para el grupo 1 (Cohen de 1,14). Conclusión:: entre los grupos, el Masaje+Reiki consiguió mejores resultados; se sugiere realizar otro estudio con uso de placebo para el Reiki, para evaluar el alcance de la técnica de forma separada. RBR-42c8wp. Article Published Date : Nov 27, 2016

Reiki for Cancer Patients Undergoing Chemotherapy in a Brazilian Hospital: A Pilot Study.

Abstract Title: Reiki for Cancer Patients Undergoing Chemotherapy in a Brazilian Hospital: A Pilot Study. Abstract Source: Holist Nurs Pract. 2016 May-Jun;30(3):174-82. PMID: 27078812 Abstract Author(s): Pamela Siegel, Pedro Mourão Roxo da Motta, Luis G da Silva, Celso Stephan, Carmen Silvia Passos Lima, Nelson Filice de Barros Article Affiliation: Pamela Siegel Abstract: The purpose of this pilot study was to explore whether individualized Reiki given to cancer patients at a Brazilian hospital improved symptoms and well-being. Data from 36 patients who received 5 Reiki sessions were collected using the MYMOP and were compared before and after their treatment and also with 14 patients who did not receive Reiki and who acted as a comparison group. Twenty-one patients reported feeling better, 12 felt worse, and 3 reported no change. Of the comparison group, 6 patients reported feeling better and 8 felt worse. The Reiki practice delivered as part of the integrative care in oncology did produce clinically significant effects, although not statistically significant results, for more than half of the patients undergoing cancer treatment. Article Published Date : Apr 30, 2016

Reiki Therapy for Symptom Management in Children Receiving Palliative Care: A Pilot Study.

Abstract Title: Reiki Therapy for Symptom Management in Children Receiving Palliative Care: A Pilot Study. Abstract Source: Am J Hosp Palliat Care. 2016 Feb 7. Epub 2016 Feb 7. PMID: 26858170 Abstract Author(s): Susan E Thrane, Scott H Maurer, Dianxu Ren, Cynthia A Danford, Susan M Cohen Article Affiliation: Susan E Thrane Abstract: BACKGROUND: Pain may be reported in one-half to three-fourths of children with cancer and other terminal conditions and anxiety in about one-third of them. Pharmacologic methods do not always give satisfactory symptom relief. Complementary therapies such as Reiki may help children manage symptoms. OBJECTIVE: This pre-post mixed-methods single group pilot study examined feasibility, acceptability, and the outcomes of pain, anxiety, and relaxation using Reiki therapy with children receiving palliative care. METHODS: A convenience sample of children ages 7 to 16 and their parents were recruited from a palliative care service. Two 24-minute Reiki sessions were completed at the children's home. Paired t tests or Wilcoxon signed-rank tests were calculated to compare change from pre to post for outcome variables. Significance was set at P<.10. Cohen d effect sizes were calculated. RESULTS: The final sample included 8 verbal and 8 nonverbal children, 16 mothers, and 1 nurse. All mean scores for outcome variables decreased from pre- to posttreatment for both sessions. Significant decreases for pain for treatment 1 in nonverbal children (P = .063) and for respiratory rate for treatment 2 in verbal children (P = .009). Cohen d effect sizes were medium to large for most outcome measures. DISCUSSION: Decreased mean scores for outcome measures indicate that Reiki therapy did decrease pain, anxiety, heart, and respiratory rates, but small sample size deterred statistical significance. This preliminary work suggests that complementary methods of treatment such as Reiki may be beneficial to support traditional methods to manage pain and anxiety in children receiving palliative care. Article Published Date : Feb 06, 2016

Reiki's effect on patients with total knee arthroplasty: A pilot study.

Abstract Title: Reiki's effect on patients with total knee arthroplasty: A pilot study. Abstract Source: Nursing. 2016 Feb ;46(2):17-23. PMID: 26760383 Abstract Author(s): Barbara Byrne Notte, Carol Fazzini, Ruth A Mooney Article Affiliation: Barbara Byrne Notte Abstract: BACKGROUND: In the immediate postoperative period, managing postsurgical pain with pain medication can contribute to complications. A more effective approach might include a combination of pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic measures, such as Reiki therapy. PURPOSE: The purpose of this pilot study was to determine the impact of Reiki therapy on the pain perception of patients undergoing total knee arthroplasty (TKA) following Reiki sessions, satisfaction with Reiki therapy, satisfaction with the hospital experience overall, and pain medication use following surgery. WHAT IS REIKI?: Reiki is a technique for relaxation and stress reduction that also promotes healing. LITERATURE REVIEW: Reiki has been studied in women undergoing abdominal hysterectomies and in patients with cancer who were receiving chemotherapy. A review of 66 biofield therapy studies, including Reiki, suggested,"strong evidence for the effects of biofield therapy in the reduction of pain intensity in pain populations and moderate evidence for decreased pain in hospitalized patients." THEORETICAL FRAMEWORK: Martha Rogers's Theory of Unitary Human Beings formed the framework for this study. METHODS: The sample included 43 patients undergoing TKA, who were randomized into Reiki (N = 23) and non-Reiki (N = 20) groups. All subjects in this pilot study had unilateral TKA at the same hospital. Pain was assessed before and after Reiki therapy using the numeric rating scale in the preoperative area, postanesthesia care unit (PACU), and on each of 3 postoperative days. A questionnaire was distributed the day of discharge to measure satisfaction with Reiki and the hospital experience. RESULTS: All Reiki therapy sessions resulted in statistically significant reductions in pain, except those sessions in the PACU. Subjects receiving Reiki responded positively to questionnaires completed on the day of discharge. No statistically significant differences were found in pain medication use. DISCUSSION: Reiki may be an effective component in the management of surgical patients' postoperative pain. LIMITATIONS AND IMPLICATIONS: Subject numbers were limited due to the difficulty of meeting with the patients and obtaining informed consent. Due to the nature of Reiki therapy, the study was not blinded. Music played during Reiki therapy could have contributed to the effect experienced by the patients. Not all questionnaires were collected before patient discharge. RECOMMENDATIONS FOR FURTHER STUDIES: Future studies should include more subjects, control for music use during the Reiki session, and measure the length of time pain is decreased following Reiki treatments. UNANTICIPATED OUTCOMES: As a result of positive feedback and decreased pain ratings following Reiki sessions, a Reiki program has been established at the hospital. Ten nurses became trained and certified in Reiki. Article Published Date : Jan 31, 2016

Effects of Reiki on Pain and Vital Signs When Applied to the Incision Area of the Body After Cesarean Section Surgery: A Single-Blinded, Randomized, Double-Controlled Study.

Abstract Title: Effects of Reiki on Pain and Vital Signs When Applied to the Incision Area of the Body After Cesarean Section Surgery: A Single-Blinded, Randomized, Double-Controlled Study. Abstract Source: Holist Nurs Pract. 2016 Nov/Dec;30(6):368-378. PMID: 27763932 Abstract Author(s): Tulay Sagkal Midilli, Nazmiye Ciray Gunduzoglu Article Affiliation: Tulay Sagkal Midilli Abstract: This study was conducted to determine the effects of Reiki on pain and vital signs when applied for 15 minutes to the incision area of the body after cesarean section surgery. The study was single-blinded, randomized, and double-controlled (Reiki, sham Reiki, and control groups). Forty-five patients, equalized by age and number of births, were randomly assigned to the Reiki, sham Reiki, and control groups. The treatment, which was applied to the patients in these 3 groups, was applied for 15 minutes to the incision area of body in the first 24 and 48 hours after the operation within 4 to 8 hours of the application of standard analgesics. The study data were collected using a patient follow-up form and a visual analog scale. Mean visual analog scale measurement values were significantly different from each other according to groups and times (P<.05). A reduction in pain of 76.06% was determined in the Reiki group patients between day 1 pre-tx and after application on the second day (day 2 post-tx) measurements. Mean breathing rate and systolic blood pressure measurement values were significantly different from each other according to groups (P<.05). The Reiki group was observed to use fewer analgesics throughout the study and to need them after a longer time than the sham Reiki and control groups (P<.05). It was concluded that Reiki applied for 15 minutes to the incision area after a cesarean operation had the expected effects on pain and the need for the use of analgesics, but it had no effect on vital signs. Article Published Date : Dec 31, 2015

The use of self-Reiki for stress reduction and relaxation.

Abstract Title: The use of self-Reiki for stress reduction and relaxation. Abstract Source: J Integr Med. 2015 Sep ;13(5):336-40. PMID: 26343105 Abstract Author(s): Elaine L Bukowski Article Affiliation: Elaine L Bukowski Abstract: OBJECTIVE: More than one-third of college students reported the desire for stress reduction techniques and education. The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of a 20-week structured self-Reiki program on stress reduction and relaxation in college students. METHODS: Students were recruited from Stockton University and sessions were conducted in the privacy of their residence. Twenty students completed the entire study consisting of 20 weeks of self-Reiki done twice weekly. Each participant completed a Reiki Baseline Credibility Scale, a Reiki Expectancy Scale, and a Perceived Stress Scale (PSS) after acceptance into the study. The PSS was completed every four weeks once the interventions were initiated. A global assessment questionnaire was completed at the end of the study. Logs summarizing the outcome of each session were submitted at the end of the study. RESULTS: With the exception of three participants, participants believed that Reiki is a credible technique for reducing stress levels. Except for two participants, participants agreed that Reiki would be effective in reducing stress levels. All participants experienced stress within the month prior to completing the initial PSS. There was a significant reduction in stress levels from pre-study to post-study. There was a correlation between self-rating of improvement and final PSS scores. With one exception, stress levels at 20 weeks did not return to pre-study stress levels. CONCLUSION: This study supports the hypothesis that the calming effect of Reiki may be achieved through the use of self-Reiki. Article Published Date : Aug 31, 2015

Reiki Reduces Burnout Among Community Mental Health Clinicians.

Abstract Title: Reiki Reduces Burnout Among Community Mental Health Clinicians. Abstract Source: J Altern Complement Med. 2015 Aug ;21(8):489-95. Epub 2015 Jul 13. PMID: 26167739 Abstract Author(s): Renee M Rosada, Beverly Rubik, Barbara Mainguy, Julie Plummer, Lewis Mehl-Madrona Article Affiliation: Renee M Rosada Abstract: BACKGROUND: Clinicians working in community mental health clinics are at high risk for burnout. Burnout is a problem involving emotional exhaustion, depersonalization, and reduced personal accomplishment. Reiki is a holistic biofield energy therapy beneficial for reducing stress. The purpose of this study was to determine if 30 minutes of healing touch could reduce burnout in community mental health clinicians. METHODS: We utilized a crossover design to explore the efficacy of Reiki versus sham Reiki, a pseudo treatment designed to mimic true Reiki, as a means to reduce symptoms of burnout. Subjects were randomized to whether they started with Reiki or sham. The Maslach Burnout Inventory-Human Services Survey (MBI-HSS) and the Measure Your Medical Outcome Profile Version 2 (MYMOP-2) were used as outcome measures. Multilevel modeling was used to represent the relations among variables. RESULTS: Reiki was statistically significantly better than sham Reiki in reducing burnout among community mental health clinicians (p=0.011). Reiki was significant in reducing depersonalization (p<0.001), but only among single people. Reiki reduced the primary symptom on the MYMOP also only among single people (p=0.03). CONCLUSIONS: The effects of Reiki were differentiated from sham Reiki. Reiki could be helpful in community mental health settings for the mental health of the practitioners. Article Published Date : Jul 31, 2015

Effects of Reiki on Post-cesarean Delivery Pain, Anxiety, and Hemodynamic Parameters: A Randomized, Controlled Clinical Trial.

Abstract Title: Effects of Reiki on Post-cesarean Delivery Pain, Anxiety, and Hemodynamic Parameters: A Randomized, Controlled Clinical Trial. Abstract Source: Pain Manag Nurs. 2015 Jun ;16(3):388-99. PMID: 26025798 Abstract Author(s): Tulay Sagkal Midilli, Ismet Eser Article Affiliation: Tulay Sagkal Midilli Abstract: The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of Reiki on pain, anxiety, and hemodynamic parameters on postoperative days 1 and 2 in patients who had undergone cesarean delivery. The design of this study was a randomized, controlled clinical trial. The study took place between February and July 2011 in the Obstetrical Unit at Odemis Public Hospital in Izmir, Turkey. Ninety patients equalized by age and number of births were randomly assigned to either a Reiki group or a control group (a rest without treatment). Treatment applied to both groups in the first 24 and 48 hours after delivery for a total of 30 minutes to 10 identified regions of the body for 3 minutes each. Reiki was applied for 2 days once a day (in the first 24 and 48 hours) within 4-8 hours of the administration of standard analgesic, which was administered intravenously by a nurse. A visual analog scale and the State Anxiety Inventory were used to measure pain and anxiety. Hemodynamic parameters, including blood pressure (systolic and diastolic), pulse and breathing rates, and analgesic requirements also were recorded. Statistically significant differences in pain intensity (p = .000), anxiety value (p = .000), and breathing rate (p = .000) measured over time were found between the two groups. There was a statistically significant difference between the two groups in the time (p = .000) and number (p = .000) of analgesics needed after Reiki application and a rest without treatment. Results showed that Reiki application reduced the intensity of pain, the value of anxiety, and the breathing rate, as well as the need for and number of analgesics. However, it did not affect blood pressure or pulse rate. Reiki application as a nursing intervention is recommended as a pain and anxiety-relieving method in women after cesarean delivery. Article Published Date : May 31, 2015

The effects of Reiki therapy and companionship on quality of life, mood, and symptom distress during chemotherapy. 📎

Abstract Title: The effects of Reiki therapy and companionship on quality of life, mood, and symptom distress during chemotherapy. Abstract Source: J Evid Based Complementary Altern Med. 2015 Jan ;20(1):20-7. Epub 2014 Nov 6. PMID: 25381189 Abstract Author(s): Gabriela Orsak, Arlene M Stevens, Adam Brufsky, Mayanja Kajumba, Angela Liegey Dougall Article Affiliation: Gabriela Orsak Abstract: This pilot study examined the effects of Reiki therapy and companionship on improvements in quality of life, mood, and symptom distress during chemotherapy. Thirty-six breast cancer patients received usual care, Reiki, or a companion during chemotherapy. First, data were collected from patients receiving usual care. Second, patients were randomized to either receive Reiki or a companion during chemotherapy. Questionnaires assessing quality of life, mood, symptom distress, and Reiki acceptability were completed at baseline and chemotherapy sessions 1, 2, and 4. Reiki was rated relaxing with no side effects. Reiki and companion groups reported improvements in quality of life and mood that were greater than those seen in the usual care group. Interventions during chemotherapy, such as Reiki or companionship, are feasible, acceptable, and may reduce side effects. Article Published Date : Dec 31, 2014

Effect of Reiki therapy on pain and anxiety in adults: an in-depth literature review of randomized trials with effect size calculations. 📎

Abstract Title: Effect of Reiki therapy on pain and anxiety in adults: an in-depth literature review of randomized trials with effect size calculations. Abstract Source: Pain Manag Nurs. 2014 Dec ;15(4):897-908. Epub 2014 Feb 28. PMID: 24582620 Abstract Author(s): Susan Thrane, Susan M Cohen Article Affiliation: Susan Thrane Abstract: The objective of this study was to calculate the effect of Reiki therapy for pain and anxiety in randomized clinical trials. A systematic search of PubMed, ProQuest, Cochrane, PsychInfo, CINAHL, Web of Science, Global Health, and Medline databases was conducted using the search terms pain, anxiety, and Reiki. The Center for Reiki Research also was examined for articles. Studies that used randomization and a control or usual care group, used Reiki therapy in one arm of the study, were published in 2000 or later in peer-reviewed journals in English, and measured pain or anxiety were included. After removing duplicates, 49 articles were examined and 12 articles received full review. Seven studies met the inclusion criteria: four articles studied cancer patients, one examined post-surgical patients, and two analyzed community dwelling older adults. Effect sizes were calculated for all studies using Cohen's d statistic. Effect sizes for within group differences ranged from d = 0.24 for decrease in anxiety in women undergoing breast biopsy to d = 2.08 for decreased pain in community dwelling adults. The between group differences ranged from d = 0.32 for decrease of pain in a Reiki versus rest intervention for cancer patients to d = 4.5 for decrease in pain in community dwelling adults. Although the number of studies is limited, based on the size Cohen's d statistics calculated in this review, there is evidence to suggest that Reiki therapy may be effective for pain and anxiety. Continued research using Reiki therapy with larger sample sizes, consistently randomized groups, and standardized treatment protocols is recommended. Article Published Date : Nov 30, 2014

Enhanced coherence within the theta band between pairs of brains engaging in experienced versus naïve Reiki procedures.

Abstract Title: Enhanced coherence within the theta band between pairs of brains engaging in experienced versus naïve Reiki procedures. Abstract Source: J Altern Complement Med. 2014 Aug ;20(8):649-53. Epub 2014 Jun 26. PMID: 24967637 Abstract Author(s): Anabela Carraca Ventura, Michael A Persinger Article Affiliation: Anabela Carraca Ventura Abstract: OBJECTIVES: The study objective was to discern whether the coherence between brain activities of the"patient"and practitioner differ between Reiki experts and novices. RATIONALE: If the physical process associated with Reiki involves"convergence"between the practitioner and subject, then this congruence should be evident in time-dependent shared power within specific and meaningful frequency electroencephalographic bands. DESIGN: Simultaneous quantitative electroencephalogram measures (19 channels) were recorded from 9 pairs of subjects when 1 of the pairs was an experienced Reiki practitioner or had just been shown the procedure. Pairs recorded their experiences and images. SETTING/LOCATION: The"practitioner"and"patient"pairs were measured within a quiet, comfortable acoustic chamber. OUTCOME MEASURES: Real-time correlations and coherence between pairs of brains for power (μV(2)·Hz(-1)) within the various frequency bands over the 10-min sessions were recorded and analyzed for each pair. Descriptors of experiences were analyzed for word meanings. RESULTS: Only the coherence within the theta range increased over time between the brains of the Reiki pairs relative to the Sham pairs, particularly over the left hemisphere. The pleasantness-unpleasantness rating for the words employed to describe experiences written after the experiment were more congruent for the Reiki pairs compared to the reference pairs. CONCLUSIONS: The increased synchronization of the cerebral activity of the participant and the practitioner during proximal therapies involving touch such as Reiki may be an important component of any subsequent beneficial effects. Article Published Date : Jul 31, 2014

Reiki brief report: using Reiki to reduce stress levels in a nine-year-old child.

Abstract Title: Reiki brief report: using Reiki to reduce stress levels in a nine-year-old child. Abstract Source: Explore (NY). 2014 Jul-Aug;10(4):253-5. Epub 2014 Feb 26. PMID: 25037669 Abstract Author(s): Elaine L Bukowski, Diana Berardi Article Affiliation: Elaine L Bukowski Abstract: A nine-year-old female with a history of perinatal stroke, seizures, and type-I diabetes was seen for six weeks of Reiki to determine the effects of Reiki on relaxation, and in turn, the prevention of future seizures. The secondary and tertiary aims were to determine the effects of Reiki on sleep patterns and the stress levels of the mother. There was a decrease in stress in both the child and the mother, as measured by a modified Perceived Stress Scale and a Perceived Stress Scale, respectively. There was no change in the child's overall sense of well-being, as measured by a global questionnaire. There was a positive change in sleep patterns on 33.3% of the nights during which the study occurred, as reported on a sleep log kept by the mother. The child and the Reiki Master (a Reiki practitioner who has completed all three levels of Reiki certification training and trains and certifies individuals in the practice of Reiki as well as provides Reiki to individuals) experienced warmth and tingling sensations on the same area of the child during the Reiki sessions. The child relaxed within the first five to seven minutes of each session as reported by the Reiki Master. There were no reports of seizures during this study. Reiki may be a useful adjunct for children with increased stress levels and sleep disturbances secondary to their medical condition. Further research is warranted to evaluate the use of Reiki in children, particularly with a large sample size, and to evaluate the long-term use of Reiki and its effects on adequate sleep. Article Published Date : Jun 30, 2014

Multifunctional Merkel cells: their roles in electromagnetic reception, finger-print formation, Reiki, epigenetic inheritance and hair form.

Abstract Title: Multifunctional Merkel cells: their roles in electromagnetic reception, finger-print formation, Reiki, epigenetic inheritance and hair form. Abstract Source: Med Hypotheses. 2010 Aug;75(2):162-8. Epub 2010 Mar 1. PMID: 20189724 Abstract Author(s): M Kemal Irmak Article Affiliation: Department of Histology and Embryology, School of Medicine, Gulhane Military Medical Academy, 06018-Etlik Ankara, Turkey. This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. Abstract: Merkel cells are located in glabrous and hairy skin and in some mucosa. They are characterized by dense-core secretory granules and cytoskeletal filaments. They are attached to neighboring keratinocytes by desmosomes and contain melanosomes similar to keratinocytes. They are excitable cells in close contact with sensory nerve endings but their function is still unclear. In this review, following roles are attributed for the first time to the Merkel cells: (1) melanosomes in Merkel cells may be involved in mammalian magnetoreception. In this model melanosome as a biological magnetite is connected by cytoskeletal filaments to mechanically gated ion channels embedded in the Merkel cell membrane. The movement of melanosome with the changing electromagnetic field may open ion channels directly producing a receptor potential that can be transmitted to brain via sensory neurons. (2) Merkel cells may be involved in finger-print formation: Merkel cells in glabrous skin are located at the base of the epidermal ridges the type of which defines the finger-print pattern. Finger-print formation starts at the 10th week of pregnancy after the arrival of Merkel cells. Keratinocyte proliferation and the buckling process observed in the basal layer of epidermis resulting in the epidermal ridges may be controlled and formed by Merkel cells. (3) Brain-Merkel cell connection is bi-directional and Merkel cells not only absorb but also radiate the electromagnetic frequencies. Hence, efferent aspects of the palmar and plantar Merkel nerve endings may form the basis of the biofield modalities such as Reiki, therapeutic touch and telekinesis. (4) Adaptive geographic variations such as skin color, craniofacial morphology and hair form result from interactions between environmental factors and epigenetic inheritance system. While environmental factors produce modifications in the body, they simultaneously induce epigenetic modifications in the oocytes and in this way adaptive changes could be passed onto the next generations. Merkel cells are multisensorial cells that can receive almost all environmental stimuli including electromagnetic and ultraviolet radiations, temperature, humidity and food type and they seem to transfer the environmental information to oocytes by affecting nuclear receptors in oocytes. (5) Hair form is categorized as straight, wavy and spiral. Merkel cells found at the bulge region of hair follicles may determine the hair form with their different paracrine secretions related to hair cycle producing variations between populations. In conclusion, Merkel cells are multifunctional cells which may close the gap between orthodox medicine and complementary medicine such as acupuncture and Reiki. Article Published Date : Aug 01, 2010

Effects of Reiki on anxiety, depression, pain, and physiological factors in community-dwelling older adults.

Abstract Title: Effects of Reiki on anxiety, depression, pain, and physiological factors in community-dwelling older adults. Abstract Source: Res Gerontol Nurs. 2010 Jul ;3(3):187-99. Epub 2010 Jun 30. PMID: 20635803 Abstract Author(s): Nancy E Richeson, Judith A Spross, Katherine Lutz, Cheng Peng Article Affiliation: Nancy E Richeson Abstract: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of Reiki as an alternative and complementary approach to treating community-dwelling older adults who experience pain, depression, and/or anxiety. Participants (N = 20) were randomly assigned to either an experimental or wait list control group. The pre- and posttest measures included the Hamilton Anxiety Scale, Geriatric Depression Scale-Short Form, Faces Pain Scale, and heart rate and blood pressure. The research design included an experimental component to examine changes in these measures and a descriptive component (semi-structured interview) to elicit information about the experience of having Reiki treatments. Significant differences were observed between the experimental and treatment groups on measures of pain, depression, and anxiety; no changes in heart rate and blood pressure were noted. Content analysis of treatment notes and interviews revealed five broad categories of responses: Relaxation; Improved Physical Symptoms, Mood, and Well-Being; Curiosity and a Desire to Learn More; Enhanced Self-Care; and Sensory and Cognitive Responses to Reiki. Article Published Date : Jun 30, 2010
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Intraoperative Touch Imprint Cytology in Targeted Axillary Dissection After Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy for Breast Cancer Patients with Initial Axillary Metastasis.

Related Articles Intraoperative Touch Imprint Cytology in Targeted Axillary Dissection After Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy for Breast Cancer Patients with Initial Axillary Metastasis. Ann Surg Oncol. 2018 Oct;25(11):3150-3157 Authors: Wu S, Wang Y, Zhang N, Li J, Xu X, Shen J, Liu G Abstract BACKGROUND: For breast cancer patients, a false-negative rate lower than 10% can be achieved if targeted axillary dissection (TAD) is performed, which includes the excision of both biopsy-proven positive lymph nodes (BxLNs) and sentinel lymph nodes (SLNs). However, little evidence exists on the accuracy of intraoperative touch imprint cytology (ITPC) applied in TAD after neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC) for breast cancer patients with initial axillary metastasis. This study aimed to investigate the accuracy of ITPC in TAD after NAC. METHODS: Breast cancer patients with biopsy-confirmed nodal metastasis were prospectively enrolled in the study. After completion of NAC, all patients underwent TAD followed by axillary lymph node dissection (ALND). Then ITPC was performed to evaluate BxLNs and SLNs. The accuracy of TAD and ITPC was calculated in comparison with hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) staining of ALNs. The results of ITPC during 6 months at our center in the adjuvant setting were used for comparison . RESULTS: Overall, the false-negative rate of TAD was 10.8%. In a test with 92 patients, ITPC had an accuracy of 92.4%, a sensitivity of 87.9%, and a specificity of 94.9%. In the non-NAC group, ITPC showed similar accuracy (91.2%) and specificity (97.9%) but significantly lower sensitivity (68.9%; P = 0.03). CONCLUSIONS: The use of ITPC was feasible for TAD among breast cancer patients with biopsy-confirmed axillary metastasis who were treated with NAC. All the misses in the ITPC involved patients with micrometastases or isolated tumor cells. Use of ITPC can help decrease the number of second operations for patients with residual disease in ALNs after NAC. PMID: 30083833 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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