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Reversal of premature ovarian failure in a patient with Sjögren syndrome using an elimination diet protocol.

Abstract Title: Reversal of premature ovarian failure in a patient with Sjögren syndrome using an elimination diet protocol. Abstract Source: J Altern Complement Med. 2010 Jul;16(7):807-9. PMID: 20618099 Abstract Author(s): Joe Feuerstein Article Affiliation: Department of Integrative Medicine, Stamford Hospital, Stamford, CT 06902, USA. This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. Abstract: BACKGROUND: Premature ovarian failure is diagnosed with a picture of amenorrhea, elevated follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), and age under 40 years. Twenty percent (20%) of patients with premature ovarian failure have a concomitant autoimmune disease. Cases of premature ovarian failure associated with Sjögren syndrome have been reported in the literature. PATIENT AND METHOD: We report a case of a 42-year-old white woman with Sjögren syndrome and premature ovarian failure who underwent a reversal of her premature ovarian failure and restoration of normal menses using an elimination diet protocol. The patient was diagnosed with her rheumatological condition in 2005 and started on disease-modifying antirheumatoid drugs, which were taken intermittently due to a concern over medication side-effects. Her menses became irregular at the time of initial diagnosis and finally ceased in 2006, with a dramatic elevation in her FSH, indicative of autoimmune-induced premature ovarian failure. In March 2009, she commenced an elimination diet protocol, eliminating gluten, beef, eggs, dairy products, nightshade vegetables, refined sugars, and citrus fruit for 4 months. RESULTS: Her repeat laboratory tests after 4 months showed a drop in FSH from 88 to 6.5 and a drop in erythrocyte sedimentation rate from 40 to 16. Her menses also resumed and her rheumatological symptoms significantly improved. CONCLUSIONS: It is hypothesized that the restoration of normal menses was caused by reduced inflammation in the ovarian tissue and supports the hypothesis that the gut immune system can influence autoimmune disease and inflammation. Article Published Date : Jul 01, 2010
Therapeutic Actions DIETARY MODIFICATION Beef Free

NCBI pubmed

Low-protein diet improves meat quality of growing and finishing pigs through changing lipid metabolism, fiber characteristics, and free amino acid profile of the muscle.

Related Articles Low-protein diet improves meat quality of growing and finishing pigs through changing lipid metabolism, fiber characteristics, and free amino acid profile of the muscle. J Anim Sci. 2018 Jul 28;96(8):3221-3232 Authors: Li YH, Li FN, Duan YH, Guo QP, Wen CY, Wang WL, Huang XG, Yin YL Abstract The objective of the study was to investigate the effect of feeding reduced CP, AA-supplemented diets on meat quality in growing and finishing pigs as well as the related mechanism. In experiment 1, 18 growing pigs (36.5 kg BW) were assigned randomly and fed 1 of 3 corn-soybean meal diets containing either 18% CP (normal protein, NP), 15% CP (low protein, LP), or 12% CP (very low protein, VLP). In experiment 2, 18 finishing pigs (62.3 kg BW) were allotted randomly into 1 of the following diets: 16% CP (NP), 13% CP (LP), or 10% CP (VLP). In both experiments, the LP and VLP diets were supplemented with crystalline AA to achieve equal content of standardized ileal digestible lysine, methionine, threonine, and tryptophan. At the end of each experiment, all pigs were slaughtered to collect longissimus dorsi muscle (LM) samples. Samples were used for determining meat quality, intramuscular fat (IMF) content, fatty acid composition, free AA profile, and expression of genes for myosin heavy chain isoforms. Results showed that growing and finishing pigs fed the LP diets increased (P < 0.05) redness value of LM, while finishing pigs fed the LP and VLP diets decreased (P < 0.05) the shear force values. Compared with the NP diet, growing and finishing pigs fed lower CP diets had higher (P < 0.05) contents of IMF and MUFA, and lower (P < 0.05) contents of PUFA. Besides, higher (P < 0.05) expression levels of type I and/or IIa muscle fibers were observed in LP diet-fed growing and finishing pigs, and greater concentrations of taurine and tasty AA in VLP diet-fed growing and finishing pigs. Taken together, our results indicate that low-protein diets could positively affect meat quality of growing and finishing pigs, and likely through regulation of IMF content and fatty acid composition, fiber characteristics, and free AA profile in the muscle. PMID: 29992325 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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