Cybermedlife - Therapeutic Actions Dietary Modification - Low-Protein Diet

Long-term effects of calorie or protein restriction on serum IGF-1 and IGFBP-3 concentration in humans.

Abstract Title: Long-term effects of calorie or protein restriction on serum IGF-1 and IGFBP-3 concentration in humans. Abstract Source: Thromb Res. 2009 Mar;123(5):740-4. Epub 2008 Sep 10. PMID: 18843793 Abstract Author(s): Luigi Fontana, Edward P Weiss, Dennis T Villareal, Samuel Klein, John O Holloszy Article Affiliation: Division of Geriatrics&Nutritional Sciences, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, MO 63110, USA. This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. Abstract: Reduced function mutations in the insulin/IGF-I signaling pathway increase maximal lifespan and health span in many species. Calorie restriction (CR) decreases serum IGF-1 concentration by ~40%, protects against cancer and slows aging in rodents. However, the long-term effects of CR with adequate nutrition on circulating IGF-1 levels in humans are unknown. Here we report data from two long-term CR studies (1 and 6 years) showing that severe CR without malnutrition did not change IGF-1 and IGF-1 : IGFBP-3 ratio levels in humans. In contrast, total and free IGF-1 concentrations were significantly lower in moderately protein-restricted individuals. Reducing protein intake from an average of 1.67 g kg(-1) of body weight per day to 0.95 g kg(-1) of body weight per day for 3 weeks in six volunteers practicing CR resulted in a reduction in serum IGF-1 from 194 ng mL(-1) to 152 ng mL(-1). These findings demonstrate that, unlike in rodents, long-term severe CR does not reduce serum IGF-1 concentration and IGF-1 : IGFBP-3 ratio in humans. In addition, our data provide evidence that protein intake is a key determinant of circulating IGF-1 levels in humans, and suggest that reduced protein intake may become an important component of anticancer and anti-aging dietary interventions. Article Published Date : Mar 01, 2009

Treatment of chronic uremic patients with protein-poor diet and oral supply of essential amino acids. I. Nitrogen balance studies. 1

Abstract Title: Treatment of chronic uremic patients with protein-poor diet and oral supply of essential amino acids. I. Nitrogen balance studies. Abstract Source: Clin Nephrol. 1975;3(5):187-94. PMID: 1149343 Abstract Author(s): J Bergström, P Fürst, L O Norée Abstract: Twenty-six nitrogen balance studies were performed in 15 patients with severe uremia (Ccr mean value 5.1, range 2.3-8.5 ml/min) treated with an unselected protein-poor (16-20 g protein/day corresponding to 2.6-3.2 g N/day) diet and oral supply of the essential amino acids including histidine (2.6 g N/day). The general condition improved and the concentration of serum urea nitrogen decreased. The nitrogen balance, corrected for changes in total urea pool, was negative on the diet alone,-1.46 plus or minus 1.15 g N/day (mean plus or minus SD), but was positive when the essential amino acids were supplied, plus 0.84 plus or minus 0.68 g N/day. In four patients studied after 3 to 26 months of diet and amino acid therapy, during which time a further deterioriation of the renal function had occurred, the nitrogen balance was around zero in three and negative in one patient (-1.2 g N/day). The results show that it is possible with our new regimen to attain positive nitrogen balance or nitrogen equilibrium in severely uremic patients without excessive accumulation of urea in the body fluids.   Article Published Date : Jan 01, 1975

Treatment of chronic uremic patients with protein-poor diet and oral supply of essential amino acids. II. Clinical results of long-term treatment.

Abstract Title: Treatment of chronic uremic patients with protein-poor diet and oral supply of essential amino acids. II. Clinical results of long-term treatment. Abstract Source: Clin Nephrol. 1975;3(5):195-203. PMID: 1149344 Abstract Author(s): L O Norée, J Bergström Abstract: Twenty-six uremic patients - serum urea nitrogen (SUN) 110 MG/100 ml plus or minus 22.8 (mean plus or minus SD), serum cretinine (S-Creat) 13.2 mg/100 ml plus or minus 2.27, ratio SUN/S-Creat 8.6 plus or minus 2.26, and endogenous creatinine clearance (Ccr) 3.86 plus or minus 1.41 ml/min - were treated for three months or longer with an unselected protein-poor (16-20 g protein/day) diet with oral supply of the essential amino acids including histidine in high doses as coated tablets. The amino acids were instituted after an initial diet only period (mean 0.4 months). The average treatment time was 8.4 months (range 2.7-33.6). An improvement of the general condition was obtained, persisting for several months. SUN and SUN/S-Creat decreased on the diet alone, continued to decrease after one month, and increased slightly again after three months of treatment, but did not reach the initial levels for several months in spite of an almost doubled nitrogen intake. S-Creat increased after six months indicating a further deterioration of the renal function. In patients with initially low serum total protein (smaller than 6.5 g/100 ml, 9 patients), albumin (smaller than 3.5 g/100 ml, 10 patients), and total iron-binding capacity (smaller than 260 mug/100 ml, 11 patients) the values increased after one month on amino acids and were thereafter stable. No signs of bleeding tendency, progressive muscle atrophy, or progressive peripheral neuropathy were observed. - Five patients died due to cardiovascular maladies. A further 13 patients were withdrawn for medical reasons (overhydration, 4 patients; hypertension, 1 patient; nausea and vomiting, 7 patients; and pericarditis, 1 patient). - The renal function improved in one patient. Four patients received home dialysis training, three a kidney transplant. - The results indicate that it is possible to keep severely uremic patients free from uremic symptoms, counteract protein depletion, and even improve the nutritional status during long-term treatment with an unselected protein-poor diet supplementd with essential amino acids.   Article Published Date : Jan 01, 1975
Therapeutic Actions DIETARY MODIFICATION Low-Protein Diet

NCBI pubmed

HOPE FOR PKU. FUTURE.

Related Articles HOPE FOR PKU. FUTURE. Aust Nurs Midwifery J. 2016 07;24(1):35 Authors: Inglis J Abstract I have been living with Phenylketonuria (PKU) for 45 years. My journey has been challenging for many reasons but mostly related to how the disease is viewed and the lack of awareness. PMID: 29237116 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Genetic variation of fasting glucose and changes in glycemia in response to 2-year weight-loss diet intervention: the POUNDS LOST trial.

Related Articles Genetic variation of fasting glucose and changes in glycemia in response to 2-year weight-loss diet intervention: the POUNDS LOST trial. Int J Obes (Lond). 2016 Jul;40(7):1164-9 Authors: Wang T, Huang T, Zheng Y, Rood J, Bray GA, Sacks FM, Qi L Abstract OBJECTIVE: Weight-loss intervention through diet modification has been widely used to improve obesity-related hyperglycemia; however, little is known about whether genetic variation modifies the intervention effect. We examined the interaction between weight-loss diets and genetic variation of fasting glucose on changes in glycemic traits in a dietary intervention trial. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: The Preventing Overweight Using Novel Dietary Strategies (POUNDS LOST) trial is a randomized, controlled 2-year weight-loss trial. We assessed overall genetic variation of fasting glucose by calculating a genetic risk score (GRS) based on 14 fasting glucose-associated single nucleotide polymorphisms, and examined the progression in fasting glucose and insulin levels, and insulin resistance and insulin sensitivity in 733 adults from this trial. RESULTS: The GRS was associated with 6-month changes in fasting glucose (P<0.001), fasting insulin (P=0.042), homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR, P=0.009) and insulin sensitivity (HOMA-S, P=0.043). We observed significant interaction between the GRS and dietary fat on 6-month changes in fasting glucose, HOMA-IR and HOMA-S after multivariable adjustment (P-interaction=https://eutils.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/eutils/0.007, 0.045 and 0.028, respectively). After further adjustment for weight loss, the interaction remained significant on change in fasting glucose (P=0.015). In the high-fat diet group, participants in the highest GRS tertile showed increased fasting glucose, whereas participants in the lowest tertile showed decreased fasting glucose (P-trend <0.001); in contrast, the genetic association was not significant in the low-fat diet group (P-trend=0.087). CONCLUSIONS: Our data suggest that participants with a higher genetic risk may benefit more by eating a low-fat diet to improve glucose metabolism. PMID: 27113490 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Impact of diet and nutraceutical supplementation on inflammation in elderly people. Results from the RISTOMED study, an open-label randomized control trial.

Related Articles Impact of diet and nutraceutical supplementation on inflammation in elderly people. Results from the RISTOMED study, an open-label randomized control trial. Clin Nutr. 2016 Aug;35(4):812-8 Authors: Ostan R, Béné MC, Spazzafumo L, Pinto A, Donini LM, Pryen F, Charrouf Z, Valentini L, Lochs H, Bourdel-Marchasson I, Blanc-Bisson C, Buccolini F, Brigidi P, Franceschi C, d'Alessio PA Abstract BACKGROUND & AIMS: Eating habits may influence the life span and the quality of ageing process by modulating inflammation. The RISTOMED project was developed to provide a personalized and balanced diet, enriched with or without nutraceutical compounds, to decrease and prevent inflammageing, oxidative stress and gut microbiota alteration in healthy elderly people. This paper focused on the effect on inflammation and metabolism markers after 56 days of RISTOMED diet alone or supplementation with three nutraceutical compounds. METHODS: A cohort of 125 healthy elderly subjects was recruited and randomized into 4 arms (Arm A, RISTOMED diet; Arm B, RISTOMED diet plus VSL#3 probiotic blend; Arm C, RISTOMED diet plus AISA d-Limonene; Arm D, RISTOMED diet plus Argan oil). Inflammatory and metabolism parameters as well as the ratio between Clostridium cluster IV and Bifidobacteria (CL/B) were collected before and after 56 days of dietary intervention, and their evolution compared among the arms. Moreover, participants were subdivided according to their baseline inflammatory parameters (erythrocytes sedimentation rate (ESR), C-Reactive Protein, fibrinogen, Tumor Necrosis Factor-alfa (TNF-α), and Interleukin 6) in two clusters with low or medium-high level of inflammation. The evolution of the measured parameters was then examined separately in each cluster. RESULTS: Overall, RISTOMED diet alone or with each nutraceutical supplementation significantly decreased ESR. RISTOMED diet supplemented with d-Limonene resulted in a decrease in fibrinogen, glucose, insulin levels and HOMA-IR. The most beneficial effects were observed in subjects with a medium-high inflammatory status who received RISTOMED diet with AISA d-Limonene supplementation. Moreover, RISTOMED diet associated with VSL#3 probiotic blend induced a decrease in the CL/B ratio. CONCLUSIONS: Overall, this study emphasizes the beneficial anti-inflammageing effect of RISTOMED diet supplemented with nutraceuticals to control the inflammatory status of elderly individuals. PMID: 26249791 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]