Cybermedlife - Therapeutic Actions Dietary Modification - Low-Protein Diet

Long-term effects of calorie or protein restriction on serum IGF-1 and IGFBP-3 concentration in humans. 📎

Abstract Title: Long-term effects of calorie or protein restriction on serum IGF-1 and IGFBP-3 concentration in humans. Abstract Source: Thromb Res. 2009 Mar;123(5):740-4. Epub 2008 Sep 10. PMID: 18843793 Abstract Author(s): Luigi Fontana, Edward P Weiss, Dennis T Villareal, Samuel Klein, John O Holloszy Article Affiliation: Division of Geriatrics&Nutritional Sciences, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, MO 63110, USA. This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. Abstract: Reduced function mutations in the insulin/IGF-I signaling pathway increase maximal lifespan and health span in many species. Calorie restriction (CR) decreases serum IGF-1 concentration by ~40%, protects against cancer and slows aging in rodents. However, the long-term effects of CR with adequate nutrition on circulating IGF-1 levels in humans are unknown. Here we report data from two long-term CR studies (1 and 6 years) showing that severe CR without malnutrition did not change IGF-1 and IGF-1 : IGFBP-3 ratio levels in humans. In contrast, total and free IGF-1 concentrations were significantly lower in moderately protein-restricted individuals. Reducing protein intake from an average of 1.67 g kg(-1) of body weight per day to 0.95 g kg(-1) of body weight per day for 3 weeks in six volunteers practicing CR resulted in a reduction in serum IGF-1 from 194 ng mL(-1) to 152 ng mL(-1). These findings demonstrate that, unlike in rodents, long-term severe CR does not reduce serum IGF-1 concentration and IGF-1 : IGFBP-3 ratio in humans. In addition, our data provide evidence that protein intake is a key determinant of circulating IGF-1 levels in humans, and suggest that reduced protein intake may become an important component of anticancer and anti-aging dietary interventions. Article Published Date : Mar 01, 2009

Treatment of chronic uremic patients with protein-poor diet and oral supply of essential amino acids. I. Nitrogen balance studies. 1

Abstract Title: Treatment of chronic uremic patients with protein-poor diet and oral supply of essential amino acids. I. Nitrogen balance studies. Abstract Source: Clin Nephrol. 1975;3(5):187-94. PMID: 1149343 Abstract Author(s): J Bergström, P Fürst, L O Norée Abstract: Twenty-six nitrogen balance studies were performed in 15 patients with severe uremia (Ccr mean value 5.1, range 2.3-8.5 ml/min) treated with an unselected protein-poor (16-20 g protein/day corresponding to 2.6-3.2 g N/day) diet and oral supply of the essential amino acids including histidine (2.6 g N/day). The general condition improved and the concentration of serum urea nitrogen decreased. The nitrogen balance, corrected for changes in total urea pool, was negative on the diet alone,-1.46 plus or minus 1.15 g N/day (mean plus or minus SD), but was positive when the essential amino acids were supplied, plus 0.84 plus or minus 0.68 g N/day. In four patients studied after 3 to 26 months of diet and amino acid therapy, during which time a further deterioriation of the renal function had occurred, the nitrogen balance was around zero in three and negative in one patient (-1.2 g N/day). The results show that it is possible with our new regimen to attain positive nitrogen balance or nitrogen equilibrium in severely uremic patients without excessive accumulation of urea in the body fluids.   Article Published Date : Jan 01, 1975

Treatment of chronic uremic patients with protein-poor diet and oral supply of essential amino acids. II. Clinical results of long-term treatment.

Abstract Title: Treatment of chronic uremic patients with protein-poor diet and oral supply of essential amino acids. II. Clinical results of long-term treatment. Abstract Source: Clin Nephrol. 1975;3(5):195-203. PMID: 1149344 Abstract Author(s): L O Norée, J Bergström Abstract: Twenty-six uremic patients - serum urea nitrogen (SUN) 110 MG/100 ml plus or minus 22.8 (mean plus or minus SD), serum cretinine (S-Creat) 13.2 mg/100 ml plus or minus 2.27, ratio SUN/S-Creat 8.6 plus or minus 2.26, and endogenous creatinine clearance (Ccr) 3.86 plus or minus 1.41 ml/min - were treated for three months or longer with an unselected protein-poor (16-20 g protein/day) diet with oral supply of the essential amino acids including histidine in high doses as coated tablets. The amino acids were instituted after an initial diet only period (mean 0.4 months). The average treatment time was 8.4 months (range 2.7-33.6). An improvement of the general condition was obtained, persisting for several months. SUN and SUN/S-Creat decreased on the diet alone, continued to decrease after one month, and increased slightly again after three months of treatment, but did not reach the initial levels for several months in spite of an almost doubled nitrogen intake. S-Creat increased after six months indicating a further deterioration of the renal function. In patients with initially low serum total protein (smaller than 6.5 g/100 ml, 9 patients), albumin (smaller than 3.5 g/100 ml, 10 patients), and total iron-binding capacity (smaller than 260 mug/100 ml, 11 patients) the values increased after one month on amino acids and were thereafter stable. No signs of bleeding tendency, progressive muscle atrophy, or progressive peripheral neuropathy were observed. - Five patients died due to cardiovascular maladies. A further 13 patients were withdrawn for medical reasons (overhydration, 4 patients; hypertension, 1 patient; nausea and vomiting, 7 patients; and pericarditis, 1 patient). - The renal function improved in one patient. Four patients received home dialysis training, three a kidney transplant. - The results indicate that it is possible to keep severely uremic patients free from uremic symptoms, counteract protein depletion, and even improve the nutritional status during long-term treatment with an unselected protein-poor diet supplementd with essential amino acids.   Article Published Date : Jan 01, 1975
Therapeutic Actions DIETARY MODIFICATION Low-Protein Diet

NCBI pubmed

Dietary Therapies: Emerging Paradigms in Therapy of Drug Resistant Epilepsy in Children : Based on 6th Dr. I. C. Verma Excellence in Research Award Oration.

Related Articles Dietary Therapies: Emerging Paradigms in Therapy of Drug Resistant Epilepsy in Children : Based on 6th Dr. I. C. Verma Excellence in Research Award Oration. Indian J Pediatr. 2018 Sep 21;: Authors: Gulati S Abstract About one-third of childhood epilepsy ultimately becomes drug resistant epilepsy. Only about one-third of drug resistant epilepsy is amenable for epilepsy surgery. Epilepsy surgery and vagal nerve stimulation is still beyond the reach of huge proportion of children with pharmacoresistant epilepsy. Ketogenic diet (KD) has been in use for almost a century now all over the world for drug resistant epilepsy, although in between there was a decline in its popularity with advent of newer antiepileptic drugs like valproate, phenytoin and carbamazepine. Again from 1990s there was resurgence of interest in KD for pharmacoresistant epilepsy and in the last two decades several randomized controlled trials and systemic reviews have proved its efficacy beyond any suspicion. Ketogenic diet is a high fat low carbohydrate and low protein diet, which has been found to reduce epileptogenesis in body most probably by production of ketone bodies. Modified Atkin's Diet (MAD) first introduced in 2003 and Low Glycemic Index Treatment (LGIT) first introduced in 2005 are another two dietary therapies, which are less restrictive, more palatable with fewer adverse effects and comparable efficacy. MAD is also a high fat, low carbohydrate diet, in which high sugar foods are discouraged and protein and fluids are unrestricted. In LGIT, only carbohydrates with Glycemic Index <50 are allowed and carbohydrate intake is restricted to 40-60 g per day. Medium Chain Triglyceride KD (MCT KD) is another alternative, in which there are more food choices as compared to classic KD, with comparable efficacy. PMID: 30242606 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

Effect of A Very Low-Calorie Ketogenic Diet on Food and Alcohol Cravings, Physical and Sexual Activity, Sleep Disturbances, and Quality of Life in Obese Patients.

Related Articles Effect of A Very Low-Calorie Ketogenic Diet on Food and Alcohol Cravings, Physical and Sexual Activity, Sleep Disturbances, and Quality of Life in Obese Patients. Nutrients. 2018 Sep 21;10(10): Authors: Castro AI, Gomez-Arbelaez D, Crujeiras AB, Granero R, Aguera Z, Jimenez-Murcia S, Sajoux I, Lopez-Jaramillo P, Fernandez-Aranda F, Casanueva FF Abstract Psychological well-being and hunger and food control are two relevant factors involved in the success of weight-loss therapy in treating obesity. Thus, this study aims to evaluate food and alcohol cravings, physical and sexual activity, sleep, and life quality (QoL) in obese patients following a very low-calorie ketogenic (VLCK) diet, as well as the role of weight lost and ketosis on these parameters. A battery of psychological test was performed in twenty obese patients (12 females, 47.2 ± 10.2 year and BMI of 35.5 ± 4.4) through the course of a 4-month VLCK diet on four subsequent visits: baseline, maximum ketosis, reduced ketosis, and endpoint. Each subject acted as their own control. Relevantly, the dietary-induced changes in body composition (7.7 units of BMI lost, 18 kg of fat mass (1.2 kg of visceral fat mass)) were associated with a statistically significant improvement in food craving scores, physical activity, sleepiness, and female sexual function. Overall, these results also translated in a notable enhancement in QoL of the treated obese patients. Therefore, the rapid and sustained weight and fat mass (FM) loss induced by the VLCK diet is associated with good food control and improvements in the psychological well-being parameters in obese subjects, which could contribute to the long-term success of this therapy. PMID: 30241426 [PubMed - in process]