CYBERMED LIFE - ORGANIC  & NATURAL LIVING

Cybermedlife - Therapeutic Actions Reflexology

The Effects of Aromatherapy Massage and Reflexology on Pain and Fatigue in Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

Abstract Title: The Effects of Aromatherapy Massage and Reflexology on Pain and Fatigue in Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis: A Randomized Controlled Trial. Abstract Source: Pain Manag Nurs. 2016 Apr ;17(2):140-9. Epub 2016 Apr 16. PMID: 27091583 Abstract Author(s): Zehra Gok Metin, Leyla Ozdemir Article Affiliation: Zehra Gok Metin Abstract: Nonpharmacologic interventions for symptom management in patients with rheumatoid arthritis are underinvestigated. Limited data suggest that aromatherapy massage and reflexology may help to reduce pain and fatigue in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. The aim of this study was to examine and compare the effects of aromatherapy massage and reflexology on pain and fatigue in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. The study sample was randomly assigned to either an aromatherapy massage (n = 17), reflexology (n = 17) or the control group (n = 17). Aromatherapy massage was applied to both knees of subjects in the first intervention group for 30 minutes. Reflexology was administered to both feet of subjects in the second intervention group for 40 minutes during weekly home visits. Control group subjects received no intervention. Fifty-one subjects with rheumatoid arthritis were recruited from a university hospital rheumatology clinic in Turkey between July 2014 and January 2015 for this randomized controlled trial. Data were collected by personal information form, DAS28 index, Visual Analog Scale and Fatigue Severity Scale. Pain and fatigue scores were measured at baseline and within an hour after each intervention for 6 weeks. Pain and fatigue scores significantly decreased in the aromatherapy massage and reflexology groups compared with the control group (p < .05). The reflexology intervention started to decrease mean pain and fatigue scores earlier than aromatherapy massage (week 1 vs week 2 for pain, week 1 vs week 4 for fatigue) (p < .05). Aromatherapy massage and reflexology are simple and effective nonpharmacologic nursing interventions that can be used to help manage pain and fatigue in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Article Published Date : Mar 31, 2016

Determination of efficacy of reflexology in managing patients with diabetic neuropathy: a randomized controlled clinical trial. 📎

Abstract Title: Determination of efficacy of reflexology in managing patients with diabetic neuropathy: a randomized controlled clinical trial. Abstract Source: Evid Based Complement Alternat Med. 2014 ;2014:843036. Epub 2014 Jan 9. PMID: 24527055 Abstract Author(s): Krishna Dalal, V Bharathi Maran, Ravindra M Pandey, Manjari Tripathi Article Affiliation: Krishna Dalal Abstract: Background. The restricted usage of existing pharmacological methods which do not seem to provide the treatment of diabetic neuropathy may lead to exploring the efficacy of a complementary therapy. In this context, this paper was devoted to evaluate the efficacy of foot reflexology. This health science works on the hypothesis that the dysfunctional states of body parts could be identified by observing certain skin features and be rectified by stimulating certain specific areas mapped on feet. Method. Subjects (N = 58) with diagnosed diabetic neuropathy were randomly distributed into reflexology and control groups in which both group patients were treated with ongoing pharmacological drugs. Reflexology group patients were additionally treated holistically with the hypothesis that this therapy would bring homeostasis among body organ functions. This was a caregiver-based study with a follow-up period of 6 months. The outcome measures were pain reduction, glycemic control, nerve conductivity, and thermal and vibration sensitivities. The skin features leading to the detection of the abnormal functional states of body parts were also recorded and analyzed. Results. Reflexology group showed more improvements in all outcome measures than those of control subjects with statistical significance. Conclusion. This study exhibited the efficient utility of reflexology therapy integrated with conventional medicines in managing diabetic neuropathy. Article Published Date : Dec 31, 2013

A pilot study exploring the effects of reflexology on cold intolerance. 📎

Abstract Title: A pilot study exploring the effects of reflexology on cold intolerance. Abstract Source: J Cardiovasc Pharmacol. 2010 Apr;55(4):377-84. PMID: 20633515 Abstract Author(s): Wenping Zhang, Shougo Takahashi, Takashi Miki, Hisayo Fujieda, Torao Ishida Article Affiliation: Department of Acupuncture, Institute of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Suzuka University of Medical Science, Mie, Japan. Abstract: Cold intolerance is an inability to tolerate cold temperatures and is accompanied by symptoms including headache, shoulder discomfort, dizziness and palpitations. The current study was performed to examine whether reflexology therapy affected cold intolerance in human subjects and whether the treatment was systemically effective. Ten female volunteer examinees with subjective feelings of cold were examined. After a 5-minute foot bath, 10 minutes of reflexology therapy was performed on their left foot. Skin temperature and blood flow were estimated before and after treatment, together with an interview concerning their feelings of cold and daily habits. In addition, how the recovery rate was affected by the application of a chilled-water load was also estimated. Along with significant increases in skin temperature and blood flow compared with pre-treatment at the bilateral points of KI-1, LR-3, and BL-60, a faster recovery after the application of the chilled-water load was also seen in the lower limbs on both sides. From these results, we conclude that reflexology has systemic effects and is an alternative method for treating cold intolerance. Article Published Date : Apr 01, 2010

Randomised controlled trial of the effectiveness of using foot reflexology to improve quality of sleep amongst Taiwanese postpartum women.

Abstract Title: Randomised controlled trial of the effectiveness of using foot reflexology to improve quality of sleep amongst Taiwanese postpartum women. Abstract Source: Midwifery. 2009 Jul 3. PMID: 19577829 Abstract Author(s): Chia-Yen Li, Su-Chiu Chen, Chung-Yi Li, Meei-Ling Gau, Chiu-Mieh Huang Abstract: OBJECTIVE: to examine the effectiveness of using foot reflexology to improve sleep quality in postpartum women. DESIGN AND SETTING: randomised controlled trial, conducted at two postpartum centres in northern Taiwan. PARTICIPANTS: 65 postpartum women reporting poor quality of sleep were recruited from July 2007 to December 2007. INTERVENTIONS: participants were assigned randomly to either an intervention or a control group. Participants in both groups received the same care except for reflexology therapy. The intervention group received a single 30-minute foot reflexology session at the same time each evening for five consecutive days. Sessions were administered by a certified nurse reflexologist. MEASURES AND FINDINGS: the outcome measure was the Pittsburgh sleep quality index (PSQI), and this was performed at baseline and post test. Mean PQSI scores for both groups declined over time between baseline and post test. Using a generalised estimation equation to control several confounding variables, the changes in mean PSQI were found to be significantly lower in the intervention group (beta=-2.24, standard error=0.38, p<0.001) than in the control group. CONCLUSION: an intervention involving foot reflexology in the postnatal period significantly improved the quality of sleep. IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE: midwives should evaluate maternal sleep quality and design early intervention programmes to improve quality of sleep in order to increase maternal biopsychosocial well-being. Midwives interested in complementary therapies should be encouraged to obtain training in reflexology and to apply it in clinical settings if it is allowed. Article Published Date : Jul 03, 2009

The efficacy of reflexology: systematic review. 📎

Abstract Title: The efficacy of reflexology: systematic review. Abstract Source: J Adv Nurs. 2008 Jun;62(5):512-20. PMID: 18489444 Abstract Author(s): Mei-Yeh Wang, Pei-Shan Tsai, Pi-Hsia Lee, Wen-Yin Chang, Che-Ming Yang Article Affiliation: Graduate Institute of Medical Science, College of Medicine, Taipei Medical University, Taiwan. Abstract: AIM: This paper is a report of a systematic review to evaluate the efficacy of reflexology in any condition. BACKGROUND: Anecdotal evidence has shown potential benefits of reflexology in a variety of health conditions. However, the efficacy of reflexology has yet to be determined. DATA SOURCES: Cochrane library, PubMed, MEDLINE, EBM review, ProQuest Medical Bundle and SCOPUS databases were searched using the following medical subject headings or key words: reflexology, foot reflexotherapy, reflexological treatment, foot massage and zone therapy. Chinese articles were searched through the Chinese electronic periodical services and Wangfane database. The publication date was limited from 1996 to 2007. REVIEW METHODS: Studies were selected if they were written in English or Chinese, used a controlled clinical trial design, used reflexology as a stand-alone modality, and reported such outcomes as symptoms relief, quality of life and patients' perceptions of reflexology. Study quality was reviewed based on the evidence rating system of the United States Preventive Services Task Force, and studies with the evidence rating of II-2 fair or above were included in this review. RESULTS: Among the five studies suitable for review, there was only one report of a statistically significant treatment effect. Among the 12 outcome variables examined, the treatment effect size for urinary symptoms was large, whereas the effect size for other conditions was negligible. CONCLUSION: There is no evidence for any specific effect of reflexology in any conditions, with the exception of urinary symptoms associated with multiple sclerosis. Routine provision of reflexology is therefore not recommended. Article Published Date : Jun 01, 2008

Randomized controlled trial of foot reflexology for patients with symptomatic idiopathic detrusor overactivity.

Abstract Title: Randomized controlled trial of foot reflexology for patients with symptomatic idiopathic detrusor overactivity. Abstract Source: Int Urogynecol J Pelvic Floor Dysfunct. 2007 Jun;18(6):653-8. Epub 2006 Sep 27. PMID: 17003953 Abstract Author(s): Ho-Leung Jimmy Mak, Willy Cecilia Cheon, To Wong, Yu Sun John Liu, Wai Mei Anny Tong Article Affiliation: Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Queen Elizabeth Hospital, Hong Kong, China. This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. Abstract: The aim of this study was to examine whether foot reflexology has beneficial effects on patients with idiopathic detrusor overactivity. One hundred and nine women with symptomatic idiopathic detrusor overactivity were randomized into either foot reflexology treatment group or nonspecific foot massage control group. The primary outcome measure was the change in the diurnal micturition frequency. There was significant change in the number of daytime frequency in the reflexology group when compared with the massage group (-1.90 vs -0.55, p = 0.029). There was also a decrease in the 24-h micturition frequency in both groups, but the change was not statistically significant (-2.80 vs -1.04 p = 0.055). In the reflexology group, more patients believed to have received "true" reflexology (88.9 vs 67.4%, p = 0.012). This reflects the difficulty of blinding in trials of reflexology. Larger scale studies with a better-designed control group and an improved blinding are required to examine if reflexology is effective in improving patients' overall outcome. Article Published Date : Jun 01, 2007

A randomised-controlled trail examining the effects of reflexology of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD).

Abstract Title: A randomised-controlled trail examining the effects of reflexology of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Abstract Source: Complement Ther Clin Pract. 2006 May;12(2):141-7. Epub 2005 Dec 27. PMID: 16648092 Abstract Author(s): Iain S A Wilkinson, Samantha Prigmore, Charlotte F Rayner Abstract: It is known that many patients with obstructive pulmonary diseases use a number of complementary and alternative medicines (CAM). There has been a great deal of interest into the CAM recently, with the House of Lords select committee for science and technology's report suggesting randomised-controlled trials are the best means of researching the area. There is very little research into the effects of reflexology specifically on the effects it has on COPD. As such a randomised-controlled trial was set up to examine the effects of reflexology treatments on COPD. Results were qualitative and quantitative and showed that there are a number of areas of possible benefit for patients with COPD, but a larger scale study with a longer time frame is needed for a full evaluation of these effects. Article Published Date : May 01, 2006
Therapeutic Actions Reflexology

NCBI pubmed

Prospective examination of the changes in the urinary microbiome induced by transrectal biopsy of the prostate using 16S rRNA gene analysis.

Prospective examination of the changes in the urinary microbiome induced by transrectal biopsy of the prostate using 16S rRNA gene analysis. Prostate Cancer Prostatic Dis. 2019 Jan 21;: Authors: Alanee S, El-Zawahry A, Dynda D, McVary K, Karr M, Braundmeier-Fleming A Abstract OBJECTIVES: To prospectively examine the changes in microbiota within the urinary tract after transrectal prostate biopsy. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Data, urine, and fecal samples prospectively collected from 30 patients before and after transrectal biopsy of the prostate. DNA was extracted from urine collected after a prostate massage before and after prostate biopsy, and from fecal samples collected before the biopsy. We sequenced DNA using the bacterial 16S rRNA high-throughput next-generation sequencing and analyzed changes in microbial profiles for taxonomy comparison between samples. RESULTS: Pre-biopsy urinary microbial profiles contained Lactobacillus and Staphylococcus bacteria. Post-biopsy urinary microbial profiles included lower levels of Lactobacillus and higher levels of Prevotella bacteria. Bacteroides bacteria were predominant in fecal samples. We identified two clustering patterns containing both pre- and post-biopsy urine samples. Cluster 1 had a urine cluster pattern that was distinct from fecal, whereas cluster 2 was similar to fecal. We observed two different modes of microbial changes, 11 patients had both of their urine (pre and post) samples associated with a particular cluster group, whereas others (n = 15) had movement between clusters 1 and 2 following the biopsy procedure. Four patient's post-biopsy urine microbial profiles clustered very tightly to the fecal microbial profile. CONCLUSIONS: We describe two models of change in the urinary tract microbiota after prostate biopsy using 16S RNA gene analysis. Further research to determine what controls changes in the urinary microbiota after prostate biopsy can help us understand why some patients are more susceptible to develop post-biopsy infections. PMID: 30664733 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

Frequency-Specific Microcurrent for Treatment of Longstanding Congenital Muscular Torticollis.

Frequency-Specific Microcurrent for Treatment of Longstanding Congenital Muscular Torticollis. Pediatr Phys Ther. 2019 Jan 16;: Authors: Thompson R, Kaplan SL Abstract PURPOSE: This case describes the first episode of care, using conservative treatment, massage, and frequency-specific microcurrent (FSM), for a 19-month-old boy with grade 8 left congenital muscular torticollis with fibrotic nodules. METHODS: Ten weeks of physical therapy provided stretching, strengthening, massage, and parent education, adding FSM in weeks 3 to 10 for this patient. RESULTS: Full passive cervical rotation and lateral flexion, 4/5 lateral cervical flexion strength, improved head tilt, and inability to palpate fibrotic nodules were achieved by week 8, with partial home program adherence. CONCLUSIONS AND RECOMMENDATIONS FOR PRACTICE: Excellent outcomes were achieved with conservative care in a patient with poor prognosis and likelihood of surgical referral. Combining stretching, strengthening, massage, postural reeducation, and FSM resulted in full range and good strength in an exceptionally short time. The combination of massage and FSM, not previously reported, are tools that may be effective in congenital muscular torticollis treatment. PMID: 30664049 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

A Hand-Held Device to Apply Instrument-Assisted Soft Tissue Mobilization at Targeted Compression Forces and Stroke Frequencies.

Related Articles A Hand-Held Device to Apply Instrument-Assisted Soft Tissue Mobilization at Targeted Compression Forces and Stroke Frequencies. J Med Device. 2019 Mar;13(1):0145041-145045 Authors: Everingham JB, Martin PT, Lujan TJ Abstract Instrument-assisted soft tissue mobilization (IASTM) is a manual therapy technique that is commonly used to treat dysfunctions in ligaments and other musculoskeletal tissues. The objective of this study was to develop a simple hand-held device that helps users accurately apply targeted compressive forces and stroke frequencies during IASTM treatments. This portable device uses a force sensor, tablet computer, and custom software to guide the application of user-specified loading parameters. To measure performance, the device was used to apply a combination of targeted forces and stroke frequencies to foam blocks and silicone pads. Three operators using the device applied targeted forces between 0.3 and 125 N with less than 10% error and applied targeted stroke frequencies between 0.25 and 1.0 Hz with less than 3% error. The mean error in applying targeted forces increased significantly at compressive forces less than 0.2 N and greater than 125 N. For experimental validation, the device was used to apply a series of IASTM treatments over three-weeks to rodents with a ligament injury, and the targeted compressive force and stroke frequency were repeatedly applied with an average error less than 5%. This validated device can be used to investigate the effect of IASTM loading parameters on tissue healing in animal and human studies, and therefore can support the optimization and adoption of IASTM protocols that improve patient outcomes. PMID: 30662581 [PubMed]

Roller massage: is the numeric pain rating scale a reliable measurement and can it direct individuals with no experience to a specific roller density?

Related Articles Roller massage: is the numeric pain rating scale a reliable measurement and can it direct individuals with no experience to a specific roller density? J Can Chiropr Assoc. 2018 Dec;62(3):161-169 Authors: Cheatham SW, Stull KR, Kolber MJ Abstract This investigation measured the reliability of the numeric pain rating scale (NPRS) for roller massage (RM) over two sessions and compared it to pressure pain threshold (PPT) during a third session. Twenty-five subjects participated. Session one, subjects rolled on 3 different rollers and filled out the NPRS for each roller then chose their preferred roller. Session two, subjects repeated the testing blind-folded to eliminate visual biases. Session three, subjects repeated testing but were measured with PPT. For the NPRS, there was poor to moderate reliability for the soft roller (ICC=0.60) and good reliability for the moderate (ICC=0.82) and hard density (ICC= 0.90) rollers. For preferred roller, there was no significant difference between sessions (t (24) =.00, p=1.00). For NPRS and PPT, there was a fair relationship for all rollers (Rho=0.34-0.49, p = 0.11-0.28). The NPRS appears to be a reliable measure and may help direct individuals to a specific roller. The NPRS and PPT should be used independently. PMID: 30662071 [PubMed]

Ayurveda management of Guillain-Barre syndrome: A case report.

Related Articles Ayurveda management of Guillain-Barre syndrome: A case report. J Ayurveda Integr Med. 2019 Jan 18;: Authors: Tubaki BR, Tarapure S Abstract Guillain-Barre syndrome (GBS) is a severe acute paralytic neuropathy with rapid progression usually occurring post infections. Inspite of the active medications it is associated with severe weakness, incomplete recovery and pain. Long disease course can cause autonomic dysfunction or deterioration in general health and life threatening complications like respiratory failures. Current case was diagnosed as GBS with motor, sensory & sphincter disturbance. Ayurveda diagnosis of Sarvangavata was made and customized treatment strategy was planned. First part of Kapha pitta samrushtavata (Vatadosha associated with Kapha and Pitta dosha) and then vatahara chikitsa were followed. Treatments were Koshta shodhana (gut cleansing), Abhyanga (massage of whole body with medicated oil), Ksheera parisheka (dripping of medicated milk over body), Shastikashali panda sweda (Rubbing of medicated rice poultice over body), Anna lepa (application of medicated rice over the body), Shirotalam (trans cranial drug administration by applying medicines over scalp), Basti (trans rectal administration of medicines) and Oral medicaments. Panchakarma treatments were for 14 days followed by oral medications for next 151 days. Intervention period of 165 days showed complete recovery of all the motor, sensory & sphincter deficits however follow up of the patient was maintained for 437 days looking in to the sustainability of the outcomes. PMID: 30661945 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
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