Cybermedlife - Therapeutic Actions Dietary Modification - Paleolithic/Stone Age Diet

Paleolithic nutrition improves plasma lipid concentrations of hypercholesterolemic adults to a greater extent than traditional heart-healthy dietary recommendations.

Abstract Title: Paleolithic nutrition improves plasma lipid concentrations of hypercholesterolemic adults to a greater extent than traditional heart-healthy dietary recommendations. Abstract Source: Nutr Res. 2015 Jun ;35(6):474-9. Epub 2015 May 14. PMID: 26003334 Abstract Author(s): Robert L Pastore, Judith T Brooks, John W Carbone Article Affiliation: Robert L Pastore Abstract: Recent research suggests that traditional grain-based heart-healthy diet recommendations, which replace dietary saturated fat with carbohydrate and reduce total fat intake, may result in unfavorable plasma lipid ratios, with reduced high-density lipoprotein (HDL) and an elevation of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) and triacylglycerols (TG). The current study tested the hypothesis that a grain-free Paleolithic diet would induce weight loss and improve plasma total cholesterol, HDL, LDL, and TG concentrations in nondiabetic adults with hyperlipidemia to a greater extent than a grain-based heart-healthy diet, based on the recommendations of the American Heart Association. Twenty volunteers (10 male and 10 female) aged 40 to 62 years were selected based on diagnosis of hypercholesterolemia. Volunteers were not taking any cholesterol-lowering medications and adhered to a traditional heart-healthy diet for 4 months, followed by a Paleolithic diet for 4 months. Regression analysis was used to determine whether change in body weight contributed to observed changes in plasma lipid concentrations. Differences in dietary intakes and plasma lipid measures were assessed using repeated-measures analysis of variance. Four months of Paleolithic nutrition significantly lowered (P<.001) mean total cholesterol, LDL, and TG and increased (P<.001) HDL, independent of changes in body weight, relative to both baseline and the traditional heart-healthy diet. Paleolithic nutrition offers promising potential for nutritional management of hyperlipidemia in adults whose lipid profiles have not improved after following more traditional heart-healthy dietary recommendations. Article Published Date : May 31, 2015

Plant-rich mixed meals based on Palaeolithic diet principles have a dramatic impact on incretin, peptide YY and satiety response, but show little effect on glucose and insulin homeostasis: an acute-effects randomised study.

Abstract Title: Plant-rich mixed meals based on Palaeolithic diet principles have a dramatic impact on incretin, peptide YY and satiety response, but show little effect on glucose and insulin homeostasis: an acute-effects randomised study. Abstract Source: Br J Nutr. 2015 Feb 28 ;113(4):574-84. Epub 2015 Feb 9. PMID: 25661189 Abstract Author(s): H Frances J Bligh, Ian F Godsland, Gary Frost, Karl J Hunter, Peter Murray, Katrina MacAulay, Della Hyliands, Duncan C S Talbot, John Casey, Theo P J Mulder, Mark J Berry Article Affiliation: H Frances J Bligh Abstract: There is evidence for health benefits from 'Palaeolithic' diets; however, there are a few data on the acute effects of rationally designed Palaeolithic-type meals. In the present study, we used Palaeolithic diet principles to construct meals comprising readily available ingredients: fish and a variety of plants, selected to be rich in fibre and phyto-nutrients. We investigated the acute effects of two Palaeolithic-type meals (PAL 1 and PAL 2) and a reference meal based on WHO guidelines (REF), on blood glucose control, gut hormone responses and appetite regulation. Using a randomised cross-over trial design, healthy subjects were given three meals on separate occasions. PAL2 and REF were matched for energy, protein, fat and carbohydrates; PAL1 contained more protein and energy. Plasma glucose, insulin, glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), glucose-dependent insulinotropic peptide (GIP) and peptide YY (PYY) concentrations were measured over a period of 180 min. Satiation was assessed using electronic visual analogue scale (EVAS) scores. GLP-1 and PYY concentrations were significantly increased across 180 min for both PAL1 (P= ·001 and P< ·001) and PAL2 (P= ·011 and P= ·003) compared with the REF. Concomitant EVAS scores showed increased satiety. By contrast, GIP concentration was significantly suppressed. Positive incremental AUC over 120 min for glucose and insulin did not differ between the meals. Consumption of meals based on Palaeolithic diet principles resulted in significant increases in incretin and anorectic gut hormones and increased perceived satiety. Surprisingly, this was independent of the energy or protein content of the meal and therefore suggests potential benefits for reduced risk of obesity. Article Published Date : Feb 27, 2015

Diet in acne: further evidence for the role of nutrient signalling in acne pathogenesis.

Abstract Title: Diet in acne: further evidence for the role of nutrient signalling in acne pathogenesis. Abstract Source: Acta Derm Venereol. 2012 May ;92(3):228-31. PMID: 22419445 Abstract Author(s): Bodo C Melnik Article Affiliation: Department of Dermatology, Environmental Medicine and Health Theory, University of Osnabrück, Osnabrück, Germany. This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. Abstract: Recent evidence underlines the role of Western diet in the pathogenesis of acne. Acne is absent in populations consuming Palaeolithic diets with low glycaemic load and no consumption of milk or dairy products. Two randomized controlled studies, one of which is presented in this issue of Acta Dermato-Venereologica, have provided evidence for the beneficial therapeutic effects of low glycaemic load diets in acne. Epidemiological evidence confirms that milk consumption has an acne-promoting or acne-aggravating effect. Recent progress in understanding the nutrient-sensitive kinase mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) allows a new view of nutrient signalling in acne by both high glycaemic load and increased insulin-, IGF-1-, and leucine signalling due to milk protein consumption. Acne should be regarded as an mTORC1-driven disease of civilization, like obesity, type 2 diabetes and cancer induced by Western diet. Early dietary counselling of teenage acne patients is thus a great opportunity for dermatology, which will not only help to improve acne but may reduce the long-term adverse effects of Western diet on more serious mTORC1-driven diseases of civilization. Article Published Date : Apr 30, 2012

Dietary exposure to fumonisins and evaluation of nutrient intake in a group of adult celiac patients on a gluten-free diet.

Abstract Title: Dietary exposure to fumonisins and evaluation of nutrient intake in a group of adult celiac patients on a gluten-free diet. Abstract Source: Mol Nutr Food Res. 2012 Apr ;56(4):632-40. PMID: 22495987 Abstract Author(s): Chiara Dall'asta, Alessia Pia Scarlato, Gianni Galaverna, Furio Brighenti, Nicoletta Pellegrini Article Affiliation: Department of Organic and Industrial Chemistry, University of Parma, Parma, Italy. Abstract: SCOPE: The main objectives of this study were to estimate dietary fumonisin exposure and nutrient intake in a group of patients diagnosed with celiac disease compared to non-celiac subjects. METHODS AND RESULTS: The fumonisin level in 118 frequently consumed corn-based products was determined and dietary habits were recorded using a 7-day weighed food record. Data were then compared to those obtained for a control group. The fumonisin intake in the celiac patients was significantly higher than in controls, with mean values (± SE) of 0.395 ± 0.049 and 0.029 ± 0.006 μg/kg body weight per day, respectively. With regard to nutritional habits, celiac patients showed a preference for a high fat diet, coupled with a high intake of sweets and soft drinks and a low intake of vegetables, iron, calcium and folate. CONCLUSION: These findings may have serious health implications for the celiac population due to the widespread occurrence of fumonisins in most of the widely consumed gluten-free products, leading to continuous exposure to this particular mycotoxin. Moreover, the recorded nutritional quality of the celiac patient's diet raises concerns regarding its long-term adequacy and its potential impact on chronic conditions such as type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular diseases. Article Published Date : Mar 31, 2012

Evaluation of biological and clinical potential of paleolithic diet

Abstract Title: [Evaluation of biological and clinical potential of paleolithic diet]. Abstract Source: Rocz Panstw Zakl Hig. 2012 ;63(1):9-15. PMID: 22642064 Abstract Author(s): Lukasz M Kowalski, Jacek Bujko Article Affiliation: Wydział Nauk o Zywieniu Człowieka i Konsumpcji Szkoła Główna Gospodarstwa Wiejskiego, Warszawa. This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. Abstract: Accumulating evidences suggest that foods that were regularly consumed during the human primates and evolution, in particular during the Paleolithic era (2.6-0.01 x 10(6) years ago), may be optimal for the prevention and treatment of some chronic diseases. It has been postulated that fundamental changes in the diet and other lifestyle conditions that occurred after the Neolithic Revolution, and more recently with the beginning of the Industrial Revolution are too recent taking into account the evolutionary time scale for the human genome to have completely adjust. In contemporary Western populations at least 70% of daily energy intake is provided by foods that were rarely or never consumed by Paleolithic hunter-gatherers, including grains, dairy products as well as refined sugars and highly processed fats. Additionally, compared with Western diets, Paleolithic diets, based on recently published estimates of macronutrient and fatty acid intakes from an East African Paleolithic diet, contained more proteins and long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids, and less linoleic acid. Observational studies of hunter-gatherers and other non-western populations lend support to the notion that a Paleolithic type diet may reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease, metabolic syndrome, type 2 diabetes, cancer, acne vulgaris and myopia. Moreover, preliminary intervention studies using contemporary diet based on Paleolithic food groups (meat, fish, shellfish, fresh fruits and vegetables, roots, tubers, eggs, and nuts), revealed promising results including favorable changes in risk factors, such as weight, waist circumference, C-reactive protein, glycated haemoglobin (HbAlc), blood pressure, glucose tolerance, insulin secretion, insulin sensitivity and lipid profiles. Low calcium intake, which is often considered as a potential disadvantage of the Paleolithic diet model, should be weighed against the low content of phytates and the low content of sodium chloride, as well as the high amount of net base yielding vegetables and fruits. Increasing number of evidences supports the view that intake of high glycemic foods and insulinotropic dairy products is involved in the pathogenesis and progression of acne vulgaris in Western countries. In this context, diets that mimic the nutritional characteristics of diets found in hunter-gatherers and other non-western populations may have therapeutic value in treating acne vulgaris. Additionally, more studies is needed to determine the impact of gliadin, specific lectins and saponins on intestinal permeability and the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases. Article Published Date : Dec 31, 2011
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Therapeutic Actions DIETARY MODIFICATION Paleolithic-Stone Age Diet

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The relationship between energy intake and body-growth in children with cystic fibrosis.

The relationship between energy intake and body-growth in children with cystic fibrosis. Clin Nutr. 2018 Feb 15;: Authors: Woestenenk JW, Dalmeijer GW, van der Ent CK, Houwen RH Abstract BACKGROUND & AIMS: Body-growth, expressed as weight- and height gain, is a strong predictor of morbidity and mortality in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). Whether current historically based recommendations on a high-energy diet are sufficient for optimal growth is questionable. We therefore assessed the longitudinal relation between body-growth and routine energy intake in paediatric CF patients. METHODS: Included were patients with CF, aged 2-10 years of whom we obtained 969 measurements of weight and height along with dietary records, and 786 coefficient of fat absorption measurements (CFA). We described body-growth, energy intake, macronutrient intake and the long-term effect of energy intake and coefficient of fat absorption on body-growth during the 8-year follow-up period. RESULTS: Enrolled were 191 children with CF who had a compromised growth when compared to healthy children. The dietary intake was ≥110% estimated average requirement (EAR) in 47% of the measurements (457/969) and did not (fully) achieve the recommended high-energy level (110-200% EAR). Further, the intake expressed as EAR decreased with increasing age. Cross-sectionally, boys and girls with higher caloric intakes had higher weight-for-age (WFA). The caloric intake explained 18 and 6% of the variation. Further, boys with higher caloric intakes had also higher height-for-age-adjusted-for-target-height (HFA/TH) or BMI. The caloric intake explained 6 or 7% of the variation. Longitudinally, caloric intake was associated with both WFA in boys and girls, and with BMI in boys. Each 100 calories increased intake would result in a 0.01 (girls)-0.02 increase in z-score WFA and 0.03 increase in z-score BMI. We found no significant association between CFA and WFA, HFA/TH or BMI. The contribution of protein, fat and carbohydrates was not associated with WFA, nor with HFA/TH or BMI. CONCLUSION: Even at this relatively early age, a compromised growth in children with CF was found when compared to healthy children. The energy intake was below 110% EAR in 47% of the measurements, and appeared to be insufficient to prevent suboptimal body-growth over the 8-years of follow-up. PMID: 29472121 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

A path model analysis on predictors of dropout (at 6 and 12 months) during the weight loss interventions in endocrinology outpatient division.

Related Articles A path model analysis on predictors of dropout (at 6 and 12 months) during the weight loss interventions in endocrinology outpatient division. Endocrine. 2018 Feb 22;: Authors: Perna S, Spadaccini D, Riva A, Allegrini P, Edera C, Faliva MA, Peroni G, Naso M, Nichetti M, Gozzer C, Vigo B, Rondanelli M Abstract INTRODUCTION: This study aimed to identify the dropout rate at 6 and 12 months from the first outpatient visit, and to analyze dropout risk factors among the following areas: biochemical examinations, anthropometric measures, psychological tests, personal data, and life attitude such as smoking, physical activity, and pathologies. METHODS: This is a retrospective longitudinal observational study. Patients undergo an outpatient endocrinology visit, which includes collecting biographical data, anthropometric measurements, physical and pathological history, psychological tests, and biochemical examinations. RESULTS: The sample consists of 913 subjects (682 women and 231 men), with an average age of 50.88 years (±15.80) for the total sample, with a BMI of 33.11 ± 5.65 kg/m2. 51.9% of the patients abandoned therapy at 6 months after their first visit, and analyzing the dropout rate at 12 months, it appears that 69.5% of subjects abandon therapy. The main predictor of dropout risk factors at 6 and 12 months is the weight loss during the first 3 months (p < 0.05). As regards the hematological predictors, white blood cell and iron level stated dropout at 12 months. Patients who introduced physical activity had a reduction of - 17% (at 6 months) and -13% (at 12 months) of dropout risk (p < 0.05). As regards the "worker" status, patients classified as"retired" had a decrease risk of dropout vs. other categories of worker (i = 0.58; p < 0.05). Dropout risk at 12 months decrease in patients with a previous history of cancer, Endocrine and psychic and behavioral disorders (p < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS: The main factor that predisposes patients to continue therapy or to abandon it is the success (or failure) of the diet in the initial period, based on weight lost (or not lost) in the early months of the initiation of therapy. Furthermore, considerable differences were found in different categories of "workers", and with previous "pathologies". The level of physical activity and previous diseases also seem to be predictors of dropout. PMID: 29470776 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

Dietary patterns and risk of ulcerative colitis: a case-control study.

Related Articles Dietary patterns and risk of ulcerative colitis: a case-control study. J Hum Nutr Diet. 2018 Feb 22;: Authors: Rashvand S, Behrooz M, Samsamikor M, Jacobson K, Hekmatdoost A Abstract BACKGROUND: Recent evidence indicates a role for dietary factors in the pathogenesis of ulcerative colitis (UC). The aim of the present study was to investigate the relationship between dietary patterns and UC risk. METHODS: Sixty-two newly diagnosed cases of UC and 124 healthy age and sex-matched controls were studied. Data on diet was measured using a validated country-specific food frequency questionnaire. Factor analysis was used to define major dietary patterns based on 28 food groups and nutrient content. RESULTS: After adjustment for confounding factors, subjects who were in the highest tertile of the healthy dietary pattern had a 79% lower risk of UC (odds ratio = 0.21, 95% confidence interval = 0.07-0.59, P = 0.003), whereas the consumption of an unhealthy dietary pattern was associated with a significantly increased risk of UC (odds ratio = 3.39, 95% 95% confidence interval = 1.16-9.90, P = 0.027). CONCLUSIONS: The findings of the present study suggest that dietary patterns are associated with UC risk. PMID: 29468761 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

Effect of different levels of feed restriction and fish oil fatty acid supplementation on fat deposition by using different techniques, plasma levels and mRNA expression of several adipokines in broiler breeder hens.

Related Articles Effect of different levels of feed restriction and fish oil fatty acid supplementation on fat deposition by using different techniques, plasma levels and mRNA expression of several adipokines in broiler breeder hens. PLoS One. 2018;13(1):e0191121 Authors: Mellouk N, Ramé C, Marchand M, Staub C, Touzé JL, Venturi É, Mercerand F, Travel A, Chartrin P, Lecompte F, Ma L, Froment P, Dupont J Abstract BACKGROUND: Reproductive hens are subjected to a restricted diet to limit the decline in fertility associated with change in body mass. However, endocrine and tissue responses to diet restriction need to be documented. OBJECTIVE: We evaluated the effect of different levels of feed restriction, with or without fish oil supplementation, on metabolic parameters and adipokine levels in plasma and metabolic tissues of reproductive hens. METHODS: We designed an in vivo protocol involving 4 groups of hens; RNS: restricted (Rt) unsupplemented, ANS: ad libitum (Ad, receiving an amount of feed 1.7 times greater than animals on the restricted diet) unsupplemented, RS: Rt supplemented, and AS: Ad supplemented. The fish oil supplement was used at 1% of the total diet composition. RESULTS: Hens fed with the Rt diet had a significantly (P < 0.0001) lower growth than Ad hens, while the fish oil supplementation had no effect on these parameters. Furthermore, the bioelectrical impedance analysis (BIA) and the fat ultrasonographic examinations produced similar results to the other methods that required animals to be killed (carcass analysis and weight of adipose tissue). In addition, the Rt diet significantly (P < 0.05) decreased plasma levels of triglycerides, phospholipids, glucose and ADIPOQ, and fish oil supplementation decreased plasma levels of RARRES2. We also showed a positive correlation between insulin values and ADIPOQ or NAMPT or RARRES2 values, and a negative correlation of fat percentage to RARRES2 values. Moreover, the effects of the Rt diet and fish oil supplementation on the mRNA expression depended on the factors tested and the hen age. CONCLUSIONS: Rt diet and fish oil supplementation are able to modulate metabolic parameters and the expression of adipokines and their receptors in metabolic tissue. PMID: 29364913 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

ADHD Medication, Dietary Patterns, Physical Activity, and BMI in Children: A Longitudinal Analysis of the ECLS-K Study.

Related Articles ADHD Medication, Dietary Patterns, Physical Activity, and BMI in Children: A Longitudinal Analysis of the ECLS-K Study. Obesity (Silver Spring). 2017 Oct;25(10):1802-1808 Authors: Bowling A, Davison K, Haneuse S, Beardslee W, Miller DP Abstract OBJECTIVE: This study examined relationships between attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), stimulant use, and BMI change in a nationally representative cohort of children as well as differences in diet and physical activity that may mediate associations between stimulant use and BMI change. METHODS: By using the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study-Kindergarten Cohort 1998-1999 (N = 8,250), we modeled BMI and z score change by ADHD and stimulant start time, examined the odds of unhealthy diet and physical activity predicted by ADHD and stimulant use, and performed mediation analysis assessing indirect effects of health behaviors. RESULTS: Early stimulant use predicted short-term BMI reductions, but any stimulant use predicted increased BMI growth between fifth grade (mean age = 11.2 years) and eighth grade (mean age = 14.3 years). Children with ADHD had higher odds of poor diet regardless of medication. Health behaviors were not associated with BMI change after controlling for medication use. CONCLUSIONS: Stimulant use predicted higher BMI trajectory between fifth and eighth grade but did not affect dietary or physical activity patterns. Future research should explore potential mechanisms by which early and long-term stimulant use may affect metabolism, while clinicians should initiate nutrition counseling with families of children with ADHD, regardless of medication prescription, at or shortly after diagnosis. PMID: 28834373 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Association of endotoxaemia with serum free fatty acids in metabolically healthy and unhealthy abdominally obese individuals: a case-control study in northwest of Iran.

Related Articles Association of endotoxaemia with serum free fatty acids in metabolically healthy and unhealthy abdominally obese individuals: a case-control study in northwest of Iran. BMJ Open. 2017 May 09;7(5):e015910 Authors: Saghafi-Asl M, Amiri P, Naghizadeh M, Ghavami SM, Karamzad N Abstract OBJECTIVES: This study aimed to compare serum free fatty acids (FFAs) and lipopolysaccharide-binding protein (LBP) between metabolically healthy abdominally obese (MHAO) and metabolically unhealthy abdominally obese (MUAO) individuals. We also examined the association between serum FFAs and LBP in the participants. METHODS: In this age-matched and gender-matched case-control study, 164 abdominally obese subjects were recruited from June to November 2015 in the northwest of Iran. Demographic data, dietary intake, body composition, anthropometric indices and physical activity (PA) were assessed. Basal blood samples were collected to determine serum metabolic parameters, FFAs and LBP. Abdominal obesity was defined as having waist circumference ≥95 cm. Those with three or more metabolic alterations were defined as MUAO and those having two or less were classified as MHAO. Data were analysed using SPSS V.17.0. RESULTS: There were no significant differences in dietary intake, anthropometric indices, body composition and PA between the two groups. The odds of MUAO significantly increased by increments in serum fasting blood sugar (OR 3.79, 95% CI 2.25 to 6.40), triglycerides (OR 1.10, 95% CI 1.05 to 1.15), systolic blood pressure (OR 1.02, 95% CI 1.00 to 1.04) and diastolic blood pressure (OR 1.03, 95% CI 1.01 to 1.06) and decreased by increase in serum high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (OR 0.32, 95% CI 0.20 to 0.52). The levels of LBP and FFAs showed no significant differences between the two groups. However, significant correlations were found between LBP and FFAs in pooled population (r=0.712; p<0.001) as well as in cases (r=0.717; p<0.001) and controls (r=0.704; p<0.001). Neither FFAs nor LBP were significantly correlated with dietary intake or metabolic parameters (p>0.05). CONCLUSION: The results indicated that serum LBP and FFAs are highly correlated both in MHAO and MUAO states. In addition, the levels of LBP and FFAs seem to be more related to abdominal obesity than to the presence or absence of metabolic health. PMID: 28487462 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Changes in Synaptic Plasticity and Glutamate Receptors in Type 2 Diabetic KK-Ay Mice.

Related Articles Changes in Synaptic Plasticity and Glutamate Receptors in Type 2 Diabetic KK-Ay Mice. J Alzheimers Dis. 2017;57(4):1207-1220 Authors: Yin H, Wang W, Yu W, Li J, Feng N, Wang L, Wang X Abstract In the present study, the progressive alteration of cognition and the mechanisms of reduction in long-term potentiation (LTP) in spontaneous obese KK-Ay type 2 diabetic mice were investigated. In the study, 3-, 5-, and 7-month-old KK-Ay mice were used. The results indicated that KK-Ay mice showed cognitive deficits in the Morris water maze test beginning at the age of 3 months. LTP was significantly impaired in KK-Ay mice during whole study period (3 to 7 months). The above deficits were reversible at an early stage (3 to 5 months old) by diet intervention. Moreover, we found the underlying mechanisms of LTP impairment in KK-Ay mice might be attributed to abnormal phosphorylation or expression of postsynaptic glutamate receptor subunits instead of alteration of basal synaptic transmission. The expression levels of NR1, NR2A, and NR2B subunits of N-methyl-d-aspartate receptors (NMDARs) were unchanged while the Tyr-dependent phosphorylation of both NR2A and NR2B subunits were significantly reduced in KK-Ay mice. The level of p-Src expression mediating this process was decreased, and the level of αCaMKII autophosphorylation was also reduced. Meanwhile, the GluR1 of α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole propionic acid receptors (AMPARs) was decreased, and GluR2 was significantly increased. These data suggest that deficits in synaptic plasticity in KK-Ay mice may arise from the abnormal phosphorylation of the NR2 subunits and the alteration of subunit composition of AMPARs. Diet intervention at an early stage of diabetes might alleviate the cognitive deficits and LTP reduction in KK-Ay mice. PMID: 28304288 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Impact of carbohydrate restriction in the context of obesity on prostate tumor growth in the Hi-Myc transgenic mouse model.

Related Articles Impact of carbohydrate restriction in the context of obesity on prostate tumor growth in the Hi-Myc transgenic mouse model. Prostate Cancer Prostatic Dis. 2017 Jun;20(2):165-171 Authors: Allott EH, Macias E, Sanders S, Knudsen BS, Thomas GV, Hursting SD, Freedland SJ Abstract BACKGROUND: Previously, we showed that carbohydrate restriction with calorie restriction slowed tumor growth in xenograft mouse prostate cancer models. Herein, we examined the impact of carbohydrate restriction without calorie restriction on tumor development within the context of diet-induced obesity in the Hi-Myc transgenic mouse model of prostate cancer. METHODS: Mice were randomized at 5 weeks of age to ad libitum western diet (WD; 40% fat, 42% carbohydrate; n=39) or ad libitum no carbohydrate ketogenic diet (NCKD; 82% fat, 1% carbohydrate; n=44). At age 3 or 6 months, mice were killed, prostates weighed and prostate histology, proliferation, apoptosis and macrophage infiltration evaluated by hematoxylin and eosin, Ki67, TUNEL and F4/80 staining, respectively. Body composition was assessed by DEXA, serum cytokines measured using multiplex, and Akt/mTOR signaling assessed by Western. RESULTS: Caloric intake was higher in the NCKD group, resulting in elevated body weights at 6 months of age, relative to the WD group (45 g vs 38g; P=0.008). Despite elevated body weights, serum monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP)-1 and interleukin (IL)-1α levels were lower in NCKD versus WD mice (P=0.046 and P=0.118, respectively), and macrophage infiltration was reduced in prostates of NCKD versus WD mice (P=0.028). Relative Akt phosphorylation and phospho-S6 ribosomal protein levels were reduced in prostates of NCKD versus WD mice. However, while mice randomized to NCKD had smaller prostates after adjustment for body weight at 3 and 6 months (P=0.004 and P=0.002, respectively), NCKD mice had higher rates of adenocarcinoma at 6 months compared to WD mice (100 vs 80%, P=0.04). CONCLUSIONS: Despite higher caloric intake and elevated body weights, carbohydrate restriction lowered serum MCP-1 levels, reduced prostate macrophage infiltration, reduced prostate weight, but failed to slow adenocarcinoma development. Together, these data suggest that although carbohydrate restriction within the context of obesity may reduce obesity-associated systemic inflammation and perhaps slow tumor growth, it is not sufficient to counteract obesity-associated tumor development. PMID: 28244492 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Chronic Lithium Treatment in a Rat Model of Basal Forebrain Cholinergic Depletion: Effects on Memory Impairment and Neurodegeneration.

Related Articles Chronic Lithium Treatment in a Rat Model of Basal Forebrain Cholinergic Depletion: Effects on Memory Impairment and Neurodegeneration. J Alzheimers Dis. 2017;56(4):1505-1518 Authors: Gelfo F, Cutuli D, Nobili A, De Bartolo P, D'Amelio M, Petrosini L, Caltagirone C Abstract Alzheimer's disease (AD) is an age-related neurodegenerative disorder with multifactorial etiopathogenesis, characterized by progressive loss of memory and other cognitive functions. A fundamental neuropathological feature of AD is the early and severe brain cholinergic neurodegeneration. Lithium is a monovalent cation classically utilized in the treatment of mood disorders, but recent evidence also advances a beneficial potentiality of this compound in neurodegeneration. Interestingly, lithium acts on several processes whose alterations characterize the brain cholinergic impairment at short and long term. On this basis, the aim of the present research was to evaluate the potential beneficial effects of a chronic lithium treatment in preventing the damage that a basal forebrain cholinergic neurodegeneration provokes, by investigating memory functions and neurodegeneration correlates. Adult male rats were lesioned by bilateral injections of the immunotoxin 192 IgG-Saporin into the basal forebrain. Starting 7 days before the surgery, the animals were exposed to a 30-day lithium treatment, consisting of a 0.24% Li2CO3 diet. Memory functions were investigated by the open field test with objects, the sociability and preference for social novelty test, and the Morris water maze. Hippocampal and neocortical choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) levels and caspase-3 activity were determined. Cholinergic depletion significantly impaired spatial and social recognition memory, decreased hippocampal and neocortical ChAT levels and increased caspase-3 activity. The chronic lithium treatment significantly rescued memory performances but did not modulate ChAT availability and caspase-3 activity. The present findings support the lithium protective effects against the cognitive impairment that characterizes the brain cholinergic depletion. PMID: 28222508 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Association of a history of childhood-onset obesity and dieting with eating disorders.

Related Articles Association of a history of childhood-onset obesity and dieting with eating disorders. Eat Disord. 2017 May-Jun;25(3):216-229 Authors: Cena H, Stanford FC, Ochner L, Fonte ML, Biino G, De Giuseppe R, Taveras E, Misra M Abstract This was a retrospective, observational chart review conducted on a convenience sample of 537 outpatients, aged 16-60 years, referred to an Italian Dietetic and Nutrition University Center. The study aimed to look at the association between a history of childhood obesity and dieting behaviors with development of eating disorders (EDs) at a later age. Subjects with a history of EDs (n = 118), assessed using both self-report and health records, were compared with those with no EDs (n = 419), who were attending the clinic mainly for primary prevention of metabolic and cardiovascular risk. Logistic regression analysis was performed to assess the association of childhood-onset obesity with development of an ED at a later age. Childhood-onset obesity, gender, maternal history of eating disorders, and dieting were associated with a positive history of EDs at a later age (p < .05). It is important to raise professional awareness of early symptoms of EDs in children with a history of obesity and treat them accordingly. PMID: 28139175 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

The Effect of Intradialytic Intralipid Therapy in Pediatric Hemodialysis Patients.

Related Articles The Effect of Intradialytic Intralipid Therapy in Pediatric Hemodialysis Patients. J Ren Nutr. 2017 Mar;27(2):132-137 Authors: Haskin O, Sutherland SM, Wong CJ Abstract OBJECTIVE: Growth of children on maintenance hemodialysis is poor. Oral nutritional supplements are the preferred way to augment nutrition; however, many children have difficulties adhering to prescribed oral supplements. In our unit, we have been utilizing intralipid (IL) therapy as nutritional supplement during hemodialysis sessions. The aim of this study was to assess the safety, efficacy, and benefits of intradialytic IL therapy. DESIGN: A retrospective chart review. SUBJECTS: Fifteen pediatric hemodialysis patients receiving intradialytic IL therapy for at least 3 months from July 2011 through July 2014. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE: For each patient, anthropometric measurements and laboratory nutritional parameters were compared prior to and at the end of IL therapy. Anthropometric measurements evaluated were dry weight, height, body mass index (BMI), and BMI corrected for height age. Laboratory nutritional parameters evaluated were albumin, normalized protein catabolic rate, predialysis blood urea nitrogen, transferrin, cholesterol, and triglyceride levels. Adverse events during therapy were also noted. RESULTS: Significant improvement was noted in albumin levels, predialysis blood urea nitrogen, and normalized protein catabolic rate during therapy (P = .02; P = .03; P = .03, respectively). Six patients (37.5%) improved their weight standard deviation score, and eight patients (50%) improved their BMI standard deviation score though not statistically significant (P = .59; P = .9, respectively). No significant side effects were noted. CONCLUSIONS: Administration of IL alone during hemodialysis is well tolerated with beneficial effects on nutritional parameters. The provision of IL alone is relatively cheap and does not require additional resources. In conjunction with other measures of nutritional support, it can help improve nutritional status of pediatric hemodialysis patients. PMID: 27923526 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Dietary Habits and Risk of Kidney Function Decline in an Urban Population.

Related Articles Dietary Habits and Risk of Kidney Function Decline in an Urban Population. J Ren Nutr. 2017 Jan;27(1):16-25 Authors: Liu Y, Kuczmarski MF, Miller ER, Nava MB, Zonderman AB, Evans MK, Powe NR, Crews DC Abstract OBJECTIVE: Explore the association between following a Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH)-accordant diet and kidney end points among urban adults. DESIGN: Prospective cohort study. SETTING: Healthy Aging in Neighborhoods of Diversity across the Life Span study. SUBJECTS: A total of 1,534 urban dwelling participants of the Healthy Aging in Neighborhoods of Diversity across the Life Span study with a baseline estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) ≥60 mL/minute/1.73 m2. INTERVENTION: DASH diet accordance determined via a score based on nine target nutrients. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE: Rapid kidney function decline (eGFR decline >3 mL/minute/1.73 m2 per year), incident chronic kidney disease (CKD) (follow-up eGFR <60 mL/minute/1.73 m2), and eGFR decline >25%. RESULTS: Participants' mean age was 48 years, and 59% were African-American. Median DASH score was 1.5 (range, 0-8). Over a median of 5 years, 13.4% experienced rapid eGFR decline, including 15.2% among participants not following a DASH-accordant diet (score ≤1) and 12.0% with higher accordance (score >1) (P = .08). Outcomes varied by hypertension status. In multinomial logistic regression models, following adjustment for sociodemographic and clinical factors, including total energy intake, low DASH diet accordance was associated with rapid eGFR decline among participants with hypertension (risk ratio, 1.68; 95% confidence interval: 1.17-2.42) but not among those without hypertension (risk ratio, 0.83; 95% confidence interval: 0.56-1.24; P interaction .001). There was no statistically significant association between DASH diet accordance and incident CKD or eGFR decline >25%. Results were similar when DASH diet accordance was analyzed in tertiles. CONCLUSIONS: Among urban adults, low accordance to a DASH-type diet was not associated with incident CKD, but was associated with higher risk of rapid eGFR decline among those with hypertension, yet not among those without hypertension. Further study of dietary patterns as a potential target for improving kidney outcomes among high-risk populations is warranted. PMID: 27771303 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Development of a brief, reliable and valid diet assessment tool for impaired glucose tolerance and diabetes: the UK Diabetes and Diet Questionnaire.

Related Articles Development of a brief, reliable and valid diet assessment tool for impaired glucose tolerance and diabetes: the UK Diabetes and Diet Questionnaire. Public Health Nutr. 2017 Feb;20(2):191-199 Authors: England CY, Thompson JL, Jago R, Cooper AR, Andrews RC Abstract OBJECTIVE: Dietary advice is fundamental in the prevention and management of type 2 diabetes (T2DM). Advice is improved by individual assessment but existing methods are time-consuming and require expertise. We developed a twenty-five-item questionnaire, the UK Diabetes and Diet Questionnaire (UKDDQ), for quick assessment of an individual's diet. The present study examined the UKDDQ's repeatability and relative validity compared with 4 d food diaries. DESIGN: The UKDDQ was completed twice with a median 3 d gap (interquartile range=1-7 d) between tests. A 4 d food diary was completed after the second UKDDQ. Diaries were analysed and food groups were mapped on to the UKDDQ. Absolute agreement between total scores was examined using intra-class correlation (ICC). Agreement for individual items was tested with Cohen's weighted kappa (κ w). SETTING: South West of England. SUBJECTS: Adults (n 177, 50·3 % women) with, or at high risk for, T2DM; mean age 55·8 (sd 8·6) years, mean BMI 34·4 (sd 7·3) kg/m2; participants were 91 % White British. RESULTS: The UKDDQ showed excellent repeatability (ICC=0·90 (0·82, 0·94)). For individual items, κ w ranged from 0·43 ('savoury pastries') to 0·87 ('vegetables'). Total scores from the UKDDQ and food diaries compared well (ICC=0·54 (0·27, 0·70)). Agreement for individual items varied and was good for 'alcohol' (κ w=0·71) and 'breakfast cereals' (κ w=0·70), with no agreement for 'vegetables' (κ w=0·08) or 'savoury pastries' (κ w=0·09). CONCLUSIONS: The UKDDQ is a new British dietary questionnaire with excellent repeatability. Comparisons with food diaries found agreements similar to those for international dietary questionnaires currently in use. It targets foods and habits important in diabetes prevention and management. PMID: 27609314 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Total energy intake accounts for postnatal anthropometric growth in moderately/late preterm infants.

Related Articles Total energy intake accounts for postnatal anthropometric growth in moderately/late preterm infants. J Matern Fetal Neonatal Med. 2017 May;30(9):1080-1084 Authors: Yagasaki H, Murakami Y, Ohyama T, Koizumi K, Hoshiai M, Nakane T, Sugita K Abstract OBJECTIVE: Moderately preterm (MP) (32-33 weeks) and late preterm (LP) (34-36 weeks) infants have higher risks of mortality and growth and developmental problems. We, herein present a new concept of nutritional assessment, total energy intake (TEI), which is the sum total of kilocalories administered in all nutrient forms. METHODS: Fifty-two preterm infants were classified as MP (n = 12), LP/appropriate for gestational age (LP/AGA) (n = 33), or LP/small for gestational age (LP/SGA) (n = 7). All groups received nutrient therapy by the same protocol. The sum of the daily energy intake at 14 and 28 days after birth was determined. RESULTS: TEI was 2822.1 ± 162.1 kcal/kg/28 days in the MP group, 3187.2 ± 265.0 kcal/kg/28 days in the LP/AGA group and 3424.6 ± 210.4 kcal/kg/28 days in the LP/SGA group. In all groups, TEI for 28 days was significantly correlated with body weight gain (r = 0.465, p = 0.006). TEI for 14 days after birth was inversely correlated with the body weight loss rate after birth (r = -0.491, p = 0.0002). CONCLUSION: TEI was well correlated with anthropometric changes after birth. TEI may be used to effectively assess preterm infants' nutritional needs. PMID: 27296357 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]