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Comorbid obstructive sleep apnea and increased risk for sickle cell disease morbidity.

Related Articles Comorbid obstructive sleep apnea and increased risk for sickle cell disease morbidity. Sleep Breath. 2018 Feb 15;: Authors: Katz T, Schatz J, Roberts CW Abstract PURPOSE: Sickle cell disease (SCD) imparts an increased risk for obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) in childhood. Studies of pediatric SCD have identified an increased risk for pain and neurologic complications with comorbid OSA. We determined the rate of a broad range of SCD-related medical complications to better characterize the spectrum of SCD complications related to OSA. METHODS: Retrospective chart review at a single hematology clinic identified 641 youth with SCD who received consistent screenings for OSA as part of routine hematological health maintenance visits over an 11-year period. Medical complication rates in the 136 children with OSA determined by polysomnography exams were compared to 136 matched controls at lower risk for OSA due to negative OSA screenings or exams. RESULTS: Children with SCD and OSA had higher overall rates of SCD complications than low OSA-risk controls; lung morbidity showed the largest effect size. Infection, cardiovascular, and neurologic complications occurred at higher rates in children with OSA. Children with comorbid OSA had higher rates of SCD complications both before and after OSA diagnosis. CONCLUSIONS: OSA in children with SCD is associated with higher rates of a broad range of SCD complications, including pneumonia and acute chest syndrome. Routine screenings, diagnosis, and increased therapeutic intervention for children with comorbid OSA could decrease SCD morbidity. PMID: 29450676 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

Gene expression signature of the ageing lung: breathing new life into COPD.

Related Articles Gene expression signature of the ageing lung: breathing new life into COPD. Thorax. 2018 Feb 15;: Authors: Booth S, Hackett TL PMID: 29449438 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

Management of Pulmonary Failure after Burn Injury: From VDR to ECMO.

Related Articles Management of Pulmonary Failure after Burn Injury: From VDR to ECMO. Clin Plast Surg. 2017 Jul;44(3):513-520 Authors: Nayyar A, Charles AG, Hultman CS Abstract This article highlights the challenges in managing pulmonary failure after burn injury. The authors review several different ventilator techniques, provide weaning parameters, and discuss complications. PMID: 28576240 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Inhalation Injury: Pathophysiology, Diagnosis, and Treatment.

Related Articles Inhalation Injury: Pathophysiology, Diagnosis, and Treatment. Clin Plast Surg. 2017 Jul;44(3):505-511 Authors: Jones SW, Williams FN, Cairns BA, Cartotto R Abstract The classic determinants of mortality from severe burn injury are age, size of injury, delays of resuscitation, and the presence of inhalation injury. Of the major determinants of mortality, inhalation injury remains one of the most challenging injuries for burn care providers. Patients with inhalation injury are at increased risk for pneumonia (the leading cause of death) and multisystem organ failure. There is no consensus among leading burn care centers in the management of inhalation injury. This article outlines the current treatment algorithms and the evidence of their efficacy. PMID: 28576239 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Optimization of Positive End-Expiratory Pressure Targeting the Best Arterial Oxygen Transport in the Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome: The OPTIPEP Study.

Related Articles Optimization of Positive End-Expiratory Pressure Targeting the Best Arterial Oxygen Transport in the Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome: The OPTIPEP Study. ASAIO J. 2017 Jul/Aug;63(4):450-455 Authors: Chimot L, Fedun Y, Gacouin A, Campillo B, Marqué S, Gros A, Delour P, Bedon-Carte S, Le Tulzo Y Abstract The optimal setting for positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) in mechanical ventilation remains controversial in the treatment of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). The aim of this study was to determine the optimum PEEP level in ARDS, which we defined as the level that allowed the best arterial oxygen delivery (DO2). We conducted a physiologic multicenter prospective study on patients who suffering from ARDS according to standard definition and persistent after 6 hours of ventilation. The PEEP was set to 6 cm H2O at the beginning of the test and then was increased by 2 cm H2O after at least 15 minutes of being stabilized until the plateau pressure achieved 30 cm H2O. At each step, the cardiac output was measured by transesophageal echocardiography and gas blood was sampled. We were able to determine the optimal PEEP for 12 patients. The ratio of PaO2/FiO2 at inclusion was 131 ± 40 with a mean FiO2 of 71 ± 3%. The optimal PEEP level was lower than the higher PEEP despite a constant increase in SaO2. The optimal PEEP levels varied between 8 and 18 cm H2O. Our results show that in patients with ARDS the optimal PEEP differs between each patient and require being determined with monitoring. PMID: 27984319 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]