Cybermedlife - Therapeutic Actions Dietary Modification - Glutamic and Aspartic Acid Reduced (G.A.R.D)

The effect of dietary glutamate on fibromyalgia and irritable bowel symptoms. 📎

Abstract Title: The effect of dietary glutamate on fibromyalgia and irritable bowel symptoms. Abstract Source: Clin Exp Rheumatol. 2012 Jul 4. Epub 2012 Jul 4. PMID: 22766026 Abstract Author(s): Kathleen F Holton, Douglas L Taren, Cynthia A Thomson, Robert M Bennett, Kim D Jones Article Affiliation: Departments of Orthopaedics and Rehabilitation, Oregon Health&Science University, Portland, OR, USA. This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.. Abstract: OBJECTIVES: To examine the effects of a challenge with monosodium glutamate (MSG) as compared to placebo on the symptoms of fibromyalgia (FM), in participants who initially experienced>30% remission of symptoms on an excitotoxin elimination diet. METHODS: Fifty-seven FM patients who also had irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) were placed on a 4-week diet that excluded dietary additive excitotoxins including MSG and aspartame. Thirty-seven people completed the diet and 84% of those reported that>30% of their symptoms resolved, thus making them eligible to proceed to challenges. Subjects who improved on the diet were then randomised to a 2-week double-blind placebo-controlled crossover challenge with MSG or placebo for 3 consecutive days each week. The primary outcome measure was total symptom score. Secondary outcome measures included visual analogue pain scales (VAS for FM and IBS), an IBS Quality of Life Questionnaire (IBS QOL) and the Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire-Revised (FIQR). Repeated measures ANOVA was used to analyse crossover challenge results. RESULTS: The MSG challenge, as compared to placebo, resulted in a significant return of symptoms (total symptom score, p<0.02); a worsening of fibromyalgia severity as determined by the FIQR (p<0.03); decreased quality of life in regards to IBS symptoms (IBS QOL, p<0.05); and a non-significant trend toward worsening FM pain based on visual analogue scale (VAS, p<0.07). CONCLUSIONS: These findings suggest that dietary glutamate may be contributing to FM symptoms in some patients. Future research on the role of dietary excitotoxins in FM is warranted. Article Published Date : Jul 03, 2012
Therapeutic Actions DIETARY MODIFICATION Glutamic and Aspartic Acid Reduced (G.A.R.D)

NCBI pubmed

D:L-Amino Acid Modeling Reveals Fast Microbial Turnover of Days to Months in the Subsurface Hydrothermal Sediment of Guaymas Basin.

Related Articles D:L-Amino Acid Modeling Reveals Fast Microbial Turnover of Days to Months in the Subsurface Hydrothermal Sediment of Guaymas Basin. Front Microbiol. 2018;9:967 Authors: Møller MH, Glombitza C, Lever MA, Deng L, Morono Y, Inagaki F, Doll M, Su CC, Lomstein BA Abstract We investigated the impact of temperature on the microbial turnover of organic matter (OM) in a hydrothermal vent system in Guaymas Basin, by calculating microbial bio- and necromass turnover times based on the culture-independent D:L-amino acid model. Sediments were recovered from two stations near hydrothermal mounds (<74°C) and from one cold station (<9°C). Cell abundance at the two hydrothermal stations dropped from 108 to 106 cells cm-3 within ∼5 m of sediment depth resulting in a 100-fold lower cell number at this depth than at the cold site where numbers remained constant at 108 cells cm-3 throughout the recovered sediment. There were strong indications that the drop in cell abundance was controlled by decreasing OM quality. The quality of the sedimentary OM was determined by the diagenetic indicators %TAAC (percentage of total organic carbon present as amino acid carbon), %TAAN (percentage of total nitrogen present as amino acid nitrogen), aspartic acid:β-alanine ratios, and glutamic acid:γ-amino butyric acid ratios. All parameters indicated that the OM became progressively degraded with increasing sediment depth, and the OM in the hydrothermal sediment was more degraded than in the uniformly cold sediment. Nonetheless, the small community of microorganisms in the hydrothermal sediment demonstrated short turnover times. The modeled turnover times of microbial bio- and necromass in the hydrothermal sediments were notably faster (biomass: days to months; necromass: up to a few hundred years) than in the cold sediments (biomass: tens of years; necromass: thousands of years), suggesting that temperature has a significant influence on the microbial turnover rates. We suggest that short biomass turnover times are necessary for maintance of essential cell funtions and to overcome potential damage caused by the increased temperature.The reduced OM quality at the hyrothemal sites might thus only allow for a small population size of microorganisms. PMID: 29867871 [PubMed]

Fabrication of a triptolide-loaded and poly-γ-glutamic acid-based amphiphilic nanoparticle for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis.

Related Articles Fabrication of a triptolide-loaded and poly-γ-glutamic acid-based amphiphilic nanoparticle for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. Int J Nanomedicine. 2018;13:2051-2064 Authors: Zhang L, Chang J, Zhao Y, Xu H, Wang T, Li Q, Xing L, Huang J, Wang Y, Liang Q Abstract Triptolide (TP) exhibits immunosuppressive, cartilage-protective and anti-inflammatory effects in rheumatoid arthritis. However, the toxicity of TP limits its widespread use. To decrease the toxic effects, we developed a novel nano-drug carrier system containing TP using poly-γ-glutamic acid-grafted di-tert-butyl L-aspartate hydrochloride (PAT). PAT had an average diameter of 79±18 nm, a narrow polydispersity index (0.18), a strong zeta potential (-32 mV) and a high drug encapsulation efficiency (EE1=48.6%) and loading capacity (EE2=19.2%), and exhibited controlled release (t1/2=29 h). The MTT assay and flow cytometry results indicated that PAT could decrease toxicity and apoptosis induced by free TP on RAW264.7 cells. PAT decreased lipopolysaccharides/interferon γ-induced cytokines expression of macrophage (P<0.05). In vivo, PAT accumulated at inflammatory joints, improved the survival rate and had fewer side effects on tumor necrosis factor α transgenic mice, compared to TP. The blood biochemical indexes revealed that PAT did not cause much damage to the kidney (urea nitrogen and creatinine) and liver (alanine aminotransferase and aspartate aminotransferase). In addition, PAT reduced inflammatory synovial tissue area (P<0.05), cartilage loss (P<0.05), tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase-positive osteoclast area (P<0.05) and bone erosion (P<0.05) in both knee and ankle joints, and showed similar beneficial effect as free TP. In summary, our newly formed nanoparticle, PAT, can reduce the toxicity and guarantee the efficacy of TP, which represents an effective drug candidate for RA with low adverse side effect. PMID: 29670349 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]