Cybermedlife - Therapeutic Actions Martial Arts Practice

A randomized controlled trial of Kung Fu training for metabolic health in overweight/obese adolescents: the "martial fitness" study.

Abstract Title: A randomized controlled trial of Kung Fu training for metabolic health in overweight/obese adolescents: the "martial fitness" study. Abstract Source: J Pediatr Endocrinol Metab. 2009 Jul;22(7):595-607. PMID: 19774841 Abstract Author(s): Tracey W Tsang, Michael Kohn, Chin Moi Chow, Maria Fiatarone Singh Abstract: Twenty overweight/obese adolescents underwent six months of Kung Fu or placebo (Tai Chi) training, 3x.wk(-1). Outcomes included fasting insulin and insulin resistance, lipids, glucose and HbA(1c), and C-reactive protein (CRP). CRP decreased significantly (p = 0.03) in both groups over time at six months. Although insulin sensitivity did not change, HbA(1c) tended to decrease over time (p = 0.09), again with no group difference (p = 0.60). Reduced CRP was related to increased upper body strength (p = 0.01). Increased lean body mass was related to reductions in HbA(1c), insulin resistance, triglycerides, and total cholesterol. Improvements in lean body mass appear to have a potential role in favorable metabolic outcomes, independent of changes in fat mass. Further research in this area is warranted before definite conclusions can be drawn about the efficacy of martial arts training for metabolic outcomes in this cohort. Article Published Date : Jul 01, 2009
Therapeutic Actions Martial Arts Practice

NCBI pubmed

Participation and Injury in Martial Arts.

Related Articles Participation and Injury in Martial Arts. Curr Sports Med Rep. 2018 Dec;17(12):433-438 Authors: Koutures C, Demorest RA Abstract Martial arts encompass a variety of formal movements and traditions that can be practiced for self-defense, competition, physical fitness, motor development, and emotional growth. There are both noncombat forms that have less risk of injury and sparring/combat elements that have increased potential for injury. This article will review several common types of martial arts and the potential health benefits of participation. Common injuries of each discipline will be discussed with a focus on potential injury risk reduction efforts, such as protective padding and more focused rule enforcement. Special attention will be placed on head injuries/concussions, how forced or rapid weight loss may be a detriment to overall health, and the particular risk found in mixed martial arts competitions. PMID: 30531460 [PubMed - in process]

Body Composition Outcomes of Tai Chi and Qigong Practice: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials.

Related Articles Body Composition Outcomes of Tai Chi and Qigong Practice: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials. Int J Behav Med. 2018 Oct;25(5):487-501 Authors: Larkey LK, James D, Belyea M, Jeong M, Smith LL Abstract PURPOSE: Meditative movement (MM) practices are increasingly being studied, including examination of the potential for these modalities to contribute to weight management. METHODS: A search was conducted for randomized controlled trials testing one or both of two forms of MM, Tai Chi and Qigong, reporting effects on changes in body composition. Data from these studies were extracted and tabled, and a meta-analysis of studies with inactive control conditions was conducted. Risk of bias was assessed, and seven RCTs had a low risk of bias. Sources of bias include publication bias and selection of English only. RESULTS: Publications meeting inclusion criteria yielded 24 studies (N = 1621 participants). Significant improvements in body composition, primarily body mass index, were noted for 41.7% of studies. A synthesis table describes the distribution of design factors, including type of comparison condition (inactive vs. active) and baseline body composition status (whether or not overweight/obese). A meta-analysis was conducted on 12 studies with inactive controls (using a random effects model) finding a small-to-medium treatment effect (SMD = - 0.388, CI = [- 0.732, - 0.044], t = 2.48, p < 0.03) for TC or QG interventions with a high level of heterogeneity. CONCLUSIONS: Tai Chi and Qigong show demonstrable effects on body composition, when compared to inactive control conditions. Systematic evaluation and valid conclusions regarding the impact of Tai Chi and Qigong on body composition outcomes will require more targeted study designs and control of comparison conditions. PMID: 29856007 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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