Cybermedlife - Therapeutic Actions Dietary Modification - Traditional Japanese Diet

Dietary intake of isoflavones and polyunsaturated fatty acids associated with lung function, breathlessness and the prevalence of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: possible protective effect of traditional Japanese diet.

Abstract Title: Dietary intake of isoflavones and polyunsaturated fatty acids associated with lung function, breathlessness and the prevalence of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: possible protective effect of traditional Japanese diet. Abstract Source: Mol Nutr Food Res. 2010 Jan 28. Epub 2010 Jan 28. PMID: 20112297 Abstract Author(s): Fumi Hirayama, Andy H Lee, Colin W Binns, Naoko Hiramatsu, Mitsuru Mori, Koichi Nishimura Abstract: The Japanese diet is high in soy products and fish. A case-control study was conducted in Japan to investigate the relationship between dietary intake of isoflavones and fatty acids and lung function, breathlessness and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). A total of 278 referred patients aged 50-75 years with COPD diagnosed within the past 4 years, and 340 community-based controls were assessed for respiratory symptoms and undertook spirometric measurements of lung function. A validated food frequency questionnaire was administered face-to-face to obtain information on habitual food consumption. Dietary intakes of isoflavones and fatty acids were derived from the Japanese food composition tables. The COPD patients had significantly lower habitual intakes of isoflavones (genistein and daidzein) and polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA; both omega-3 and omega-6) than control subjects. Lung function measures were found to be positively associated with isoflavones and PUFA intake. Substantial reductions in prevalence of COPD and breathlessness were observed for isoflavones, the respective adjusted odds ratio being 0.36 (95% confidence interval 0.19-0.68) and 0.60 (95% confidence interval 0.33-1.10) for the highest versus lowest levels of total isoflavone intake. The corresponding tests for linear trend were significant. High intakes of PUFA and omega-6 fatty acids (derived from foods excluding oils and fats as seasonings) also appeared to reduce the risks of COPD and breathlessness symptom, but no evidence of association was found for other types of fatty acids. The study provided evidence of possible protective effect of traditional Japanese diet against tobacco carcinogens. Article Published Date : Jan 28, 2010

Dietary patterns associated with functional constipation among Japanese women aged 18 to 20 years: a cross-sectional study. 📎

Abstract Title: Dietary patterns associated with functional constipation among Japanese women aged 18 to 20 years: a cross-sectional study. Abstract Source: J Nutr Sci Vitaminol (Tokyo). 2007 Jun;53(3):232-8. PMID: 17874828 Abstract Author(s): Hitomi Okubo, Satoshi Sasaki, Kentaro Murakami, Mi Kyung Kim, Yoshiko Takahashi, Yoko Hosoi, Mami Itabashi, Abstract: Although several nutrients and foods have been suggested to be preventive for constipation, all previous studies have examined a single nutrient or food in each analysis. In contrast, analysis of dietary patterns may provide new insights into the influence of diet on functional constipation. We conducted a cross-sectional examination of the association between dietary pattern and functional constipation in 3,770 Japanese female dietetic course students aged 18-20 y from 53 institutions in Japan. Diet was assessed with a validated self-administered diet history questionnaire with 148 food items, from which 30 food groups were created and entered into a factor analysis. Functional constipation was defined using the Rome I criteria, which has previously been used in several epidemiologic studies on constipation. The prevalence of functional constipation was 26.0% (n=979). Four dietary patterns were identified: (1) "Healthy", (2) "Japanese traditional", (3) "Western," and 4) "Coffee and dairy products." After adjustment for several confounding factors, the "Japanese traditional" pattern, characterized by a high intake of rice, miso soup, and soy products and a low intake of bread and confectionaries, was associated with a significantly lower prevalence of functional constipation. In comparison with the lowest quintile, the multivariate adjusted odds ratio (95% confidence interval) was 0.52 (0.41-0.66) in the highest quintile (p for trend<0.0001). Other dietary patterns were not associated with functional constipation. The Japanese traditional dietary pattern, characterized by a high intake of rice and a low intake of bread and confectionaries, may be beneficial in preventing functional constipation in young Japanese women. Article Published Date : Jun 01, 2007
Therapeutic Actions DIETARY MODIFICATION Traditional Japanese Diet

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Semaglutide: Review and Place in Therapy for Adults With Type 2 Diabetes.

Related Articles Semaglutide: Review and Place in Therapy for Adults With Type 2 Diabetes. Can J Diabetes. 2018 Jun 05;: Authors: Goldenberg RM, Steen O Abstract Guidelines increasingly highlight the importance of multifactorial management in type 2 diabetes, in contrast to the more traditional focus on glycemic control. Semaglutide, a recently approved glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonist, is indicated in Canada for adults with type 2 diabetes to improve glycemic control as monotherapy with diet and exercise when metformin is inappropriate or as an add-on to either metformin alone or metformin plus a sulfonylurea or basal insulin. The Semaglutide Unabated Sustainability in Treatment of Type 2 Diabetes (SUSTAIN) clinical trial program for semaglutide comprises 6 pivotal global phase 3a trials (SUSTAIN 1 through 6) and 2 Japanese phase 3a trials. Phase 3b trials include SUSTAIN 7, and SUSTAIN 8 and 9 (both ongoing). Results from the completed trials support the superiority of semaglutide for reduction of glycated hemoglobin levels and weight loss vs. placebo as well as active comparators, including sitagliptin, exenatide extended-release, dulaglutide and insulin glargine. SUSTAIN 6 trial data confirmed cardiovascular safety and demonstrated significant reductions in major cardiovascular events with semaglutide vs. placebo, an outcome that confirmed the noninferiority of semaglutide. The robust and sustained effects of semaglutide on glycated hemoglobin levels and weight loss vs. comparators, as well as its safety and possible cardiovascular benefit, address an unmet need in the treatment of type 2 diabetes. This article overviews data from across the semaglutide clinical trial program, including efficacy and safety results and findings from post hoc analyses. The potential place of semaglutide in clinical practice is discussed. PMID: 30195966 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]