Cybermedlife - Therapeutic Actions Shiatsu

Shiatsu as an adjuvant therapy for schizophrenia: an open-label pilot study.

Abstract Title: Shiatsu as an adjuvant therapy for schizophrenia: an open-label pilot study. Abstract Source: Altern Ther Health Med. 2009 Sep-Oct;15(5):44-6. PMID: 19771930 Abstract Author(s): Pesach Lichtenberg, Agnes Vass, Hamutal Ptaya, Shany Edelman, Uriel Heresco-Levy Article Affiliation: Department of Psychiatry, Herzog Memorial Hospital, Jerusalem, Israel. Abstract: CONTEXT: Studies have suggested a possible role for shiatsu in treating a variety of mental and physical ailments. OBJECTIVE: To determine if shiatsu can provide clinical benefit to individuals diagnosed with schizophrenia. DESIGN: An open-label pilot study. SETTING: An inpatient psychiatric ward at Herzog Memorial Hospital, Jerusalem, Israel. PATIENTS: Twelve hospitalized patients with chronic schizophrenia. INTERVENTION: Shiatsu treatment provided in a course of eight 40-minute biweekly sessions over 4 weeks. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: All subjects were evaluated at baseline, 2 weeks, 4 weeks (end of treatment), and 12 weeks (followup). The tools used for assessment included the Clinical Global Impression (CGI), the Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale (BPRS), the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS), the Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HAM-D), the Hamilton Anxiety Rating Scale (HAM-A), and the Nurses' Observation Scale for Inpatient Evaluation (NOSIE). Side effects were measured using the Simpson-Angus Scale for Extrapyramidal Symptoms (SAS) and the Abnormal Involuntary Movement Scale (AIMS). RESULTS: On all scales of psychopathology and side effects, the subjects showed a statistically and clinically significant improvement by the end of treatment. This improvement was maintained at the 12-week follow-up. These findings, while encouraging, must be considered preliminary and require confirmation and cross-validation in larger-scale controlled studies. Article Published Date : Sep 01, 2009
Therapeutic Actions Shiatsu

NCBI pubmed

Paediatric massage for treatment of acute diarrhoea in children: a meta-analysis.

Related Articles Paediatric massage for treatment of acute diarrhoea in children: a meta-analysis. BMC Complement Altern Med. 2018 Sep 18;18(1):257 Authors: Gao L, Jia C, Huang H Abstract BACKGROUND: Massage therapy has been used by many traditional Chinese medicine physicians to treat acute diarrhoea in children. Since no relevant systematic reviews assessed the clinical effectiveness or the risk of massage therapy, in this study, a meta-analysis was conducted to evaluate the efficacy of paediatric massage for the treatment of acute diarrhoea in children. METHODS: In this meta-analysis, paediatric patients who were diagnosed with acute diarrhoea were included. Interventions using massage therapy alone or combined with other non-pharmacological approaches were included, while in the control groups, patients received pharmacotherapy. The primary outcome was clinical effective rate. Seven databases were used in our research, and the following search terms were used: (massage OR tui na OR manipulation OR acupressure) AND (infant OR child OR baby OR paediatrics) AND (diarrhoea OR diarrhoea) AND (randomized controlled trial). The search date was up to April 30, 2018. RESULTS: A total of 26 studies encompassing 2644 patients were included in this meta-analysis. It was shown that paediatric massage was significantly better than pharmacotherapy in treating acute diarrhoea in children in terms of clinical effective rate (n = 2213, RR = 1.20, 95% CI: 1.14 to 1.27), clinical cure rate (n = 345, RR = 1.37, 95% CI: 1.19 to 1.57), and cure time (n = 513, MD = - 0.77, 95% CI: -0.89 to - 0.64). However, the quality of evidence for this finding was low due to high risk of bias of the included studies. CONCLUSIONS: The present work supported paediatric massage in treating acute diarrhoea in children. More well-designed randomized controlled trials are still needed to further evaluate the efficacy of paediatric massage. PMID: 30227851 [PubMed - in process]