Cybermedlife - Therapeutic Actions Shiatsu

Shiatsu as an adjuvant therapy for schizophrenia: an open-label pilot study.

Abstract Title: Shiatsu as an adjuvant therapy for schizophrenia: an open-label pilot study. Abstract Source: Altern Ther Health Med. 2009 Sep-Oct;15(5):44-6. PMID: 19771930 Abstract Author(s): Pesach Lichtenberg, Agnes Vass, Hamutal Ptaya, Shany Edelman, Uriel Heresco-Levy Article Affiliation: Department of Psychiatry, Herzog Memorial Hospital, Jerusalem, Israel. Abstract: CONTEXT: Studies have suggested a possible role for shiatsu in treating a variety of mental and physical ailments. OBJECTIVE: To determine if shiatsu can provide clinical benefit to individuals diagnosed with schizophrenia. DESIGN: An open-label pilot study. SETTING: An inpatient psychiatric ward at Herzog Memorial Hospital, Jerusalem, Israel. PATIENTS: Twelve hospitalized patients with chronic schizophrenia. INTERVENTION: Shiatsu treatment provided in a course of eight 40-minute biweekly sessions over 4 weeks. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: All subjects were evaluated at baseline, 2 weeks, 4 weeks (end of treatment), and 12 weeks (followup). The tools used for assessment included the Clinical Global Impression (CGI), the Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale (BPRS), the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS), the Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HAM-D), the Hamilton Anxiety Rating Scale (HAM-A), and the Nurses' Observation Scale for Inpatient Evaluation (NOSIE). Side effects were measured using the Simpson-Angus Scale for Extrapyramidal Symptoms (SAS) and the Abnormal Involuntary Movement Scale (AIMS). RESULTS: On all scales of psychopathology and side effects, the subjects showed a statistically and clinically significant improvement by the end of treatment. This improvement was maintained at the 12-week follow-up. These findings, while encouraging, must be considered preliminary and require confirmation and cross-validation in larger-scale controlled studies. Article Published Date : Sep 01, 2009
Therapeutic Actions Shiatsu

NCBI pubmed

Guidelines for the Treatment of PTSD Using Clinical EFT (Emotional Freedom Techniques).

Related Articles Guidelines for the Treatment of PTSD Using Clinical EFT (Emotional Freedom Techniques). Healthcare (Basel). 2018 Dec 12;6(4): Authors: Church D, Stapleton P, Mollon P, Feinstein D, Boath E, Mackay D, Sims R Abstract Clinical EFT (Emotional Freedom Techniques) is an evidence-based method that combines acupressure with elements drawn from cognitive and exposure therapies. The approach has been validated in more than 100 clinical trials. Its efficacy for post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) has been investigated in a variety of demographic groups including war veterans, victims of sexual violence, the spouses of PTSD sufferers, motor accident survivors, prisoners, hospital patients, adolescents, and survivors of natural and human-caused disasters. Meta-analyses of EFT for anxiety, depression, and PTSD indicate treatment effects that exceed those of both psychopharmacology and conventional psychotherapy. Studies of EFT in the treatment of PTSD show that (a) time frames for successful treatment generally range from four to 10 sessions; (b) group therapy sessions are effective; (c) comorbid conditions such as anxiety and depression improve simultaneously; (d) the risk of adverse events is low; (e) treatment produces physiological as well as psychological improvements; (f) patient gains persist over time; (g) the approach is cost-effective; (h) biomarkers such as stress hormones and genes are regulated; and (i) the method can be adapted to online and telemedicine applications. This paper recommends guidelines for the use of EFT in treating PTSD derived from the literature and a detailed practitioner survey. It has been reviewed by the major institutions providing training or supporting research in the method. The guidelines recommend a stepped-care model, with five treatment sessions for subclinical PTSD, 10 sessions for PTSD, and escalation to intensive psychotherapy or psychopharmacology or both for nonresponsive patients and those with developmental trauma. Group therapy, social support, apps, and online and telemedicine methods also contribute to a successful treatment plan. PMID: 30545069 [PubMed]
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