Therapeutic Actions Sweating

NCBI pubmed

Short-term heat exposure promotes hippocampal neurogenesis via activation of angiotensin II type 1 receptor in adult rats.

Related Articles Short-term heat exposure promotes hippocampal neurogenesis via activation of angiotensin II type 1 receptor in adult rats. Neuroscience. 2018 Jun 11;: Authors: Koyama Y, Mukuda T, Hamasaki S, Nakane H, Kaidoh T Abstract Angiotensin II (Ang II) synthesized in response to body fluid loss caused by actions such as sweating and breathing is today considered as one of the essential factors for promoting hippocamal neurogenesis. Because heat-stimuli, along with exercise, increases systemic levels of Ang II, the effects of short-term heat exposure on hippocampal neurogenesis were examined in adult male rats. When rats were exposed daily to a 1 h heat treatment (36.0 ± 0.1°C) during a 7 d experimental period, the number of doublecortin-immunoreactive newborn cells in the hippocampal dentate gyrus was increased approximately 1.4-fold compared with that in controls that were exposed to a normothermic environment (25.0 ± 0.8°C). No significant change was observed in the number of Ki-67-immunoreactive stem cells. Western blot and immunohistochemical analyses revealed an enhancement of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression in hippocampal astrocytes following short-term heat exposure. These beneficial effects of short-term heat exposure were prevented when an antagonist for Ang II type 1 receptor (AT1R), candesartan, was given orally. These results indicate that short-term heat exposure enhances adult neurogenesis via activation of AT1R in the hippocampal dentate gyrus, in which VEGF may participate by promoting cell proliferation and/or newborn neuron survival. PMID: 29902505 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

Genome-wide association study in Japanese females identifies fifteen novel skin-related trait associations.

Related Articles Genome-wide association study in Japanese females identifies fifteen novel skin-related trait associations. Sci Rep. 2018 Jun 12;8(1):8974 Authors: Endo C, Johnson TA, Morino R, Nakazono K, Kamitsuji S, Akita M, Kawajiri M, Yamasaki T, Kami A, Hoshi Y, Tada A, Ishikawa K, Hine M, Kobayashi M, Kurume N, Tsunemi Y, Kamatani N, Kawashima M Abstract Skin trait variation impacts quality-of-life, especially for females from the viewpoint of beauty. To investigate genetic variation related to these traits, we conducted a GWAS of various skin phenotypes in 11,311 Japanese women and identified associations for age-spots, freckles, double eyelids, straight/curly hair, eyebrow thickness, hairiness, and sweating. In silico annotation with RoadMap Epigenomics epigenetic state maps and colocalization analysis of GWAS and GTEx Project eQTL signals provided information about tissue specificity, candidate causal variants, and functional target genes. Novel signals for skin-spot traits neighboured AKAP1/MSI2 (rs17833789; P = 2.2 × 10-9), BNC2 (rs10810635; P = 2.1 × 10-22), HSPA12A (rs12259842; P = 7.1 × 10-11), PPARGC1B (rs251468; P = 1.3 × 10-21), and RAB11FIP2 (rs10444039; P = 5.6 × 10-21). HSPA12A SNPs were the only protein-coding gene eQTLs identified across skin-spot loci. Double edged eyelid analysis identified that a signal around EMX2 (rs12570134; P = 8.2 × 10-15) was also associated with expression of EMX2 and the antisense-RNA gene EMX2OS in brain putamen basal ganglia tissue. A known hair morphology signal in EDAR was associated with both eyebrow thickness (rs3827760; P = 1.7 × 10-9) and straight/curly hair (rs260643; P = 1.6 × 10-103). Excessive hairiness signals' top SNPs were also eQTLs for TBX15 (rs984225; P = 1.6 × 10-8), BCL2 (rs7226979; P = 7.3 × 10-11), and GCC2 and LIMS1 (rs6542772; P = 2.2 × 10-9). For excessive sweating, top variants in two signals in chr2:28.82-29.05 Mb (rs56089836; P = 1.7 × 10-11) were eQTLs for either PPP1CB or PLB1, while a top chr16:48.26-48.45 Mb locus SNP was a known ABCC11 missense variant (rs6500380; P = 6.8 × 10-10). In total, we identified twelve loci containing sixteen association signals, of which fifteen were novel. These findings will help dermatologic researchers better understand the genetic underpinnings of skin-related phenotypic variation in human populations. PMID: 29895819 [PubMed - in process]