Cybermedlife - Therapeutic Actions Drinking a Hot Beverage

The effects of a hot drink on nasal airflow and symptoms of common cold and flu.

Abstract Title: The effects of a hot drink on nasal airflow and symptoms of common cold and flu. Abstract Source: Rhinology. 2008 Dec;46(4):271-5. PMID: 19145994 Abstract Author(s): A Sanu, R Eccles Article Affiliation: Common Cold Centre and Healthcare Clinical Trials, Cardiff School of Biosciences, Cardiff University, Cardiff, United Kingdom. Abstract: Hot drinks are a common treatment for common cold and flu but there are no studies reported in the scientific and clinical literature on this mode of treatment. This study investigated the effects of a hot fruit drink on objective and subjective measures of nasal airflow, and on subjective scores for common cold/flu symptoms in 30 subjects suffering from common cold/flu. The results demonstrate that the hot drink had no effect on objective measurement of nasal airflow but it did cause a significant improvement in subjective measures of nasal airflow. The hot drink provided immediate and sustained relief from symptoms of runny nose, cough, sneezing, sore throat, chilliness and tiredness, whereas the same drink at room temperature only provided relief from symptoms of runny nose, cough and sneezing. The effects of the drinks are discussed in terms of a placebo effect and physiological effects on salivation and airway secretions. In conclusion the results support the folklore that a hot tasty drink is a beneficial treatment for relief of most symptoms of common cold and flu. Article Published Date : Dec 01, 2008
Therapeutic Actions Drinking a Hot Beverage

NCBI pubmed

Part 3: Solid phase extraction of Russian VX and its chemical attribution signatures in food matrices and their detection by GC-MS and LC-MS.

Related Articles Part 3: Solid phase extraction of Russian VX and its chemical attribution signatures in food matrices and their detection by GC-MS and LC-MS. Talanta. 2018 Aug 15;186:607-614 Authors: Williams AM, Vu AK, Mayer BP, Hok S, Valdez CA, Alcaraz A Abstract Chemical attribution signatures indicative of O-isobutyl S-(2-diethylaminoethyl) methylphosphonothioate (Russian VX) synthetic routes were investigated in spiked food samples. Attribution signatures were identified using a multifaceted approach: Russian VX was synthesized using six synthetic routes and the chemical attribution signatures identified by GC-MS and LC-MS. Three synthetic routes were then down selected and spiked into complex matrices: bottled water, baby food, milk, liquid eggs, and hot dogs. Sampling and extraction methodologies were developed for these materials and used to isolate the attribution signatures and Russian VX from each matrix. Recoveries greater than 60% were achieved for most signatures in all matrices; some signatures provided recoveries greater than 100%, indicating some degradation during sample preparation. A chemometric model was then developed and validated with the concatenated data from GC-MS and LC-MS analyses of the signatures; the classification results of the model were > 75% for all samples. This work is part three of a three-part series in this issue of the United States-Sweden collaborative efforts towards the understanding of the chemical attribution signatures of Russian VX in crude materials and in food matrices. PMID: 29784410 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Part 2: Forensic attribution profiling of Russian VX in food using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry.

Related Articles Part 2: Forensic attribution profiling of Russian VX in food using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. Talanta. 2018 Aug 15;186:597-606 Authors: Jansson D, Lindström SW, Norlin R, Hok S, Valdez CA, Williams AM, Alcaraz A, Nilsson C, Åstot C Abstract This work is part two of a three-part series in this issue of a Sweden-United States collaborative effort towards the understanding of the chemical attribution signatures of Russian VX (VR) in synthesized samples and complex food matrices. In this study, we describe the sourcing of VR present in food based on chemical analysis of attribution signatures by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) combined with multivariate data analysis. Analytical data was acquired from seven different foods spiked with VR batches that were synthesized via six different routes in two separate laboratories. The synthesis products were spiked at a lethal dose into seven food matrices: water, orange juice, apple purée, baby food, pea purée, liquid eggs and hot dog. After acetonitrile sample extraction, the samples were analyzed by LC-MS/MS operated in MRM mode. A multivariate statistical calibration model was built on the chemical attribution profiles from 118 VR spiked food samples. Using the model, an external test-set of the six synthesis routes employed for VR production was correctly identified with no observable major impact of the food matrices to the classification. The overall performance of the statistical models was found to be exceptional (94%) for the test set samples retrospectively classified to their synthesis routes. PMID: 29784408 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]