Cybermedlife - Therapeutic Actions Emotional Freedom Technique

A Randomized Controlled Comparison of Emotional Freedom Technique and Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy to Reduce Adolescent Anxiety: A Pilot Study.

Abstract Title: A Randomized Controlled Comparison of Emotional Freedom Technique and Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy to Reduce Adolescent Anxiety: A Pilot Study. Abstract Source: J Altern Complement Med. 2017 Feb ;23(2):102-108. Epub 2016 Sep 19. PMID: 27642676 Abstract Author(s): Amy H Gaesser, Orv C Karan Article Affiliation: Amy H Gaesser Abstract: OBJECTIVE: The objective of this pilot study was to compare the efficacy of Emotional Freedom Techniques (EFT) with that of Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy (CBT) in reducing adolescent anxiety. DESIGN: Randomized controlled study. SETTINGS: This study took place in 10 schools (8 public/2 private; 4 high schools/6 middle schools) in 2 northeastern states in the United States. PARTICIPANTS: Sixty-three high-ability students in grades 6-12, ages 10-18 years, who scored in the moderate to high ranges for anxiety on the Revised Children's Manifest Anxiety Scale-2 (RCMAS-2) were randomly assigned to CBT (n = 21), EFT (n = 21), or waitlist control (n = 21) intervention groups. INTERVENTIONS: CBT is the gold standard of anxiety treatment for adolescent anxiety. EFT is an evidence-based treatment for anxiety that incorporates acupoint stimulation. Students assigned to the CBT or EFT treatment groups received three individual sessions of the identified protocols from trained graduate counseling, psychology, or social work students enrolled at a large northeastern research university. OUTCOME MEASURES: The RCMAS-2 was used to assess preintervention and postintervention anxiety levels in participants. RESULTS: EFT participants (n = 20; M = 52.16, SD = 9.23) showed significant reduction in anxiety levels compared with the waitlist control group (n = 21; M = 57.93, SD = 6.02) (p = 0.005, d = 0.74, 95% CI [-9.76, -1.77]) with a moderate to large effect size. CBT participants (n = 21; M = 54.82, SD = 5.81) showed reduction in anxiety but did not differ significantly from the EFT (p = 0.18, d = 0.34; 95% CI [-6.61, 1.30]) or control (p = 0.12, d = 0.53, 95% CI [-7.06, .84]). CONCLUSIONS: EFT is an efficacious intervention to significantly reduce anxiety for high-ability adolescents. Article Published Date : Jan 31, 2017

A Randomized, Controlled Trial of Wholistic Hybrid Derived From Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing and Emotional Freedom Technique (WHEE) for Self-Treatment of Pain, Depression, and Anxiety in Chronic Pain Patients. 📎

Abstract Title: A Randomized, Controlled Trial of Wholistic Hybrid Derived From Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing and Emotional Freedom Technique (WHEE) for Self-Treatment of Pain, Depression, and Anxiety in Chronic Pain Patients. Abstract Source: J Evid Based Complementary Altern Med. 2016 Jul 18. Epub 2016 Jul 18. PMID: 27432773 Abstract Author(s): Daniel Benor, John Rossiter-Thornton, Loren Toussaint Article Affiliation: Daniel Benor Abstract: In this pilot study, a convenience sample of 24 chronic pain patients (17 with chronic fatigue syndrome/fibromyalgia) were randomized into WHEE treatment and wait-list control groups for 6 weeks. Assessments of depression, anxiety, and pain were completed before, during, and at 1 and 3 months after treatment. Wait-listed patients then received an identical course of WHEE and assessments. WHEE decreased anxiety (P<.5) and depression (P<.05) compared with the control group. The wait-list-turned-WHEE assessments demonstrated decreased pain severity (P<.05) and depression (P<.04) but not pain interference or anxiety. WHEE appears a promising method for pain, anxiety, and depression in patients with chronic pain, compared to standard medical care alone. Though a small pilot study, the present results suggest that further research appears warranted. An incidental finding was that a majority of patients with chronic pain had suffered psychological trauma in childhood and/or adulthood. Article Published Date : Jul 17, 2016

The Emotional Freedom Technique: Finally, a Unifying Theory for the Practice of Holistic Nursing, or Too Good to Be True?

Abstract Title: The Emotional Freedom Technique: Finally, a Unifying Theory for the Practice of Holistic Nursing, or Too Good to Be True? Abstract Source: J Holist Nurs. 2016 May 11. Epub 2016 May 11. PMID: 27170647 Abstract Author(s): Patrice Rancour Article Affiliation: Patrice Rancour Abstract: The Emotional Freedom Technique (EFT) is defined and described as a clinical procedure for the relief of psychological and physical distress that patients often bring to the attention of nurses. Frequently referred to as"tapping,"this technique combines the cognitive reprocessing benefits of exposure and acceptance therapy with the energetic disturbance releases associated with acupuncture and other energy therapies. More than 60 research articles in peer-reviewed journals report a staggering 98% efficacy rate with the use of this procedure from psychological distress (posttraumatic stress disorder, phobias, anxiety, depression, etc.) to physical conditions (asthma, fibromyalgia, pain, seizure disorders, etc.) to performance issues (athletic, academic). Perhaps because of this, this technique has encountered a fair degree of skepticism within the health care community. Easily taught as a self-help aid that patients can administer to themselves, EFT becomes an efficacious tool in the hands of nurses who are seeking whole person approaches for the healing of a wide variety of psychological and physical conditions. A conceptual framework, mechanisms of action, evidence of safety, literature review, and case studies are also included. Article Published Date : May 10, 2016

Emotional Freedom Techniques for Anxiety: A Systematic Review With Meta-analysis.

Abstract Title: Emotional Freedom Techniques for Anxiety: A Systematic Review With Meta-analysis. Abstract Source: J Nerv Ment Dis. 2016 May ;204(5):388-95. PMID: 26894319 Abstract Author(s): Morgan Clond Article Affiliation: Morgan Clond Abstract: Emotional Freedom Technique (EFT) combines elements of exposure and cognitive therapies with acupressure for the treatment of psychological distress. Randomized controlled trials retrieved by literature search were assessed for quality using the criteria developed by the American Psychological Association's Division 12 Task Force on Empirically Validated Treatments. As of December 2015, 14 studies (n = 658) met inclusion criteria. Results were analyzed using an inverse variance weighted meta-analysis. The pre-post effect size for the EFT treatment group was 1.23 (95% confidence interval, 0.82-1.64; p<0.001), whereas the effect size for combined controls was 0.41 (95% confidence interval, 0.17-0.67; p = 0.001). Emotional freedom technique treatment demonstrated a significant decrease in anxiety scores, even when accounting for the effect size of control treatment. However, there were too few data available comparing EFT to standard-of-care treatments such as cognitive behavioral therapy, and further research is needed to establish the relative efficacy of EFT to established protocols. Article Published Date : Apr 30, 2016

The effect of emotional freedom technique on stress and anxiety in nursing students: A pilot study.

Abstract Title: The effect of emotional freedom technique on stress and anxiety in nursing students: A pilot study. Abstract Source: Nurse Educ Today. 2016 May ;40:104-10. Epub 2016 Feb 7. PMID: 27125158 Abstract Author(s): Susan Librizzi Patterson Article Affiliation: Susan Librizzi Patterson Abstract: BACKGROUND: Stress and anxiety have been identified as significant issues experienced by student nurses during their education. Some studies have suggested that the stress experienced by nursing students is greater than that experienced by medical students, other non-nursing healthcare students, degreed nurses, and the female population in general. A recently introduced energy type therapy, emotional freedom technique (EFT), has shown some success in reducing symptoms of anxiety, stress, and fear in a variety of settings. OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to determine the efficacy of EFT in decreasing anxiety and stress as a potential intervention to assist students in stress management. DESIGN: The study used a mixed method design of both qualitative and quantitative measures. Quantitatively, in a one group pretest-posttest design, participants received group instruction in the technique and were encouraged to repeat it daily. Self-reported anxiety was measured at baseline, and then weekly for four weeks using the Perceived Stress Scale (PSS) and the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI). The qualitative survey was completed by participants at the end of the study in order to capture a more subjective experience. SETTING: The pilot study was conducted in a two-year college in the southeastern region of the United States. PARTICIPANTS: All enrolled nursing students in an associate degree nursing program were invited to participate. Participation was voluntary, resulting in an original convenience sample of thirty-nine nursing students (N=39). METHODS: Data collection instruments included a demographic questionnaire, pretest State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI) and Perceived Stress Scale (PSS). A qualitative questionnaire was also administered at the end of the four weeks. STAI and PSS were administered weekly. Data analysis using RMANOVA was performed at the second, third and the fourth week. RESULTS: Decreases in anxiety as measured on both the STAI and PSS were statistically significant (p=.05). For PSS, STAI state and trait data, the reduction in self-reported stress was statistically significant with a mean difference baseline to week 4. Qualitative data suggested that nursing students experienced a decrease in feelings of stress and anxiety including a decrease in somatic symptoms. CONCLUSIONS: Overall, findings suggested that EFT can be an effective tool for stress management and anxiety relief in nursing students. Article Published Date : Apr 30, 2016

The Effectiveness of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy and Emotional Freedom Techniques in Reducing Depression and Anxiety Among Adults: A Pilot Study. 📎

Abstract Title: The Effectiveness of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy and Emotional Freedom Techniques in Reducing Depression and Anxiety Among Adults: A Pilot Study. Abstract Source: Integr Med (Encinitas). 2016 Apr ;15(2):27-34. PMID: 27330487 Abstract Author(s): Hannah Chatwin, Peta Stapleton, Brett Porter, Sharon Devine, Terri Sheldon Article Affiliation: Hannah Chatwin Abstract: CONTEXT: The World Health Organization (WHO) places major depressive disorder (MDD), or depression, as the fourth leading cause of disability worldwide. Some studies have found that cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) represents the most superior approach in treating mild to severe symptoms. Recent literature has indicated a number of limitations to this therapeutic approach. An approach that has received increasing attention within the literature is the emotional freedom technique (EFT). OBJECTIVE: The current pilot study aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of CBT and EFT in the treatment of depression and comorbid anxiety. DESIGN: The research team designed a pilot study structured as a randomized, controlled trial with 2 intervention arms. SETTING: The study took place at Bond University in Gold Coast, Queensland, Australia. PARTICIPANTS: Participants (n = 10) were local community members who had screened positive for a primary diagnosis of MDD. INTERVENTION: Participants were randomly assigned to an 8-wk CBT or EFT treatment program, the intervention groups. A sample of individuals from the community was assessed for comparative purposes (control group) (n = 57). OUTCOME MEASURES: Pre- and postintervention, all participants were interviewed using the Mini-International Neuropsychiatric Interview (MINI) 6.0, and they completed the following validated questionnaires: (1) the Beck Depression Inventory, second edition (BDI-2) and (2) the Depression, Anxiety, and Stress Scales (DASS-21). RESULTS: Findings revealed that both treatment approaches produced significant reductions in depressive symptoms, with the CBT group reporting a significant reduction postintervention, which was not maintained with time. The EFT group reported a delayed effect involving a significant reduction in symptoms at the 3- and 6-mo follow-ups only. Examination of the individual cases revealed clinically significant improvements in anxiety across both interventions. CONCLUSIONS: Overall, the findings provide evidence to suggest that EFT might be an effective treatment strategy worthy of further investigation. Article Published Date : Mar 31, 2016

Chronic depression treated successfully with novel taping therapy: a new approach to the treatment of depression. 📎

Abstract Title: Chronic depression treated successfully with novel taping therapy: a new approach to the treatment of depression. Abstract Source: Neuropsychiatr Dis Treat. 2016 ;12:1281-6. Epub 2016 Jun 1. PMID: 27330295 Abstract Author(s): Chang Hyun Han, Hwa Soo Hwang, Young Joon Lee, Sang Nam Lee, Jane J Abanes, Bong Hyo Lee Article Affiliation: Chang Hyun Han Abstract: INTRODUCTION: Despite improved research in the treatment, depression remains difficult to treat. Till date, successful treatment of depression using taping therapy has not been known yet. We report cases where patients with severe depressive symptoms were successfully treated by taping therapy, a new approach. METHODS: In case 1, a patient was taking several psychiatric medications for 10 years and admitted often to the psychiatric hospital with a leaning head, flexible legs, and nearly closed eyes; in case 2, a patient after a hysterectomy complained with heart palpitations, depressive- and anxiety-like behaviors, insomnia, and gastrointestinal problems; and in case 3, a patient with complaints of adverse effects from antidepressant medications had suicidal thoughts frequently. The medical tapes were placed on acupoints, trigger points, and pain points found by finger pressing examination in the chest, sides, and upper back of the patients. RESULTS: In case 1, the patient started weeping immediately after the first treatment. He discontinued psychiatric drugs and returned to baseline functioning after 2 months. In case 2, the patient felt at ease showing decreased palpitation immediately after the first treatment, and after 1 week, she quit medications. In case 3, the patient experienced a sense of calmness following the first treatment and recovered from her symptoms after 2 weeks. CONCLUSION: These results suggest the following key points: examination of acupoints and trigger points of chest, sides, and upper back is useful in the assessment of depression; regulating bioelectric currents on these points is helpful in the treatment of depression; and depression can be treated successfully with taping therapy. Article Published Date : Dec 31, 2015

THE EFFECT OF THE"EVOKING FREEDOM"TECHNIQUE ON AN UNUSUAL AND DISTURBING REQUEST.

Abstract Title: THE EFFECT OF THE"EVOKING FREEDOM"TECHNIQUE ON AN UNUSUAL AND DISTURBING REQUEST. Abstract Source: Psychol Rep. 2015 Jun ;116(3):936-40. Epub 2015 Jun 1. PMID: 26030208 Abstract Author(s): Nicolas Guéguen, Fabien Silone, Mathieu David, Alexandre Pascual Article Affiliation: Nicolas Guéguen Abstract: The"evoking freedom"technique consists in soliciting someone to comply with a request by simply saying that she is free to accept or to refuse the request. However, previous studies used low cost requests. The present study examined the magnitude of this technique associated with a more disturbing and costly request. Sixty men and 60 women aged approximately 20-25 years walking in the street were asked by a male confederate to hold a closed transparent box containing a live trap-door spider while he went into the post office to pick up a package. In the evoking freedom condition, the confederate added in his request that the participant was"free to accept or to refuse."More compliance occurred in the"evoking freedom"condition (53.3%) than in the control condition (36.7%). These results confirm the robustness and the magnitude of the evoking freedom technique on compliance and show that this technique remained effective even when the request was psychologically costly to perform and was associated with fear. Article Published Date : May 31, 2015

Emotional Freedom Technique (EFT) Effects on Psychoimmunological Factors of Chemically Pulmonary Injured Veterans. 📎

Abstract Title: Emotional Freedom Technique (EFT) Effects on Psychoimmunological Factors of Chemically Pulmonary Injured Veterans. Abstract Source: Iran J Allergy Asthma Immunol. 2015 Feb ;14(1):37-47. PMID: 25530137 Abstract Author(s): Abdolreza Babamahmoodi, Zahra Arefnasab, Ahmad Ali Noorbala, Mostafa Ghanei, Farhang Babamahmoodie, Ahmad Alipour, Mohammad Hossein Alimohammadian, Farhad Riazi Rad, Vahid Khaze, Haideh Darabi Article Affiliation: Abdolreza Babamahmoodi Abstract: Emotional Freedom Technique (EFT) as a new therapeutic technique in energy psychology has positive effects on psychological and physiological symptoms, and quality of life. In this research we studied the effect of this treatment on immunological factors. This study tested whether 8-week group sessions of EFT (compared to a wait-list control group) with emphasis on patient's respiratory, psychological and immunological problems in chemically pulmonary injured veterans (N=28) can affect on immunological and psychological factors. Mixed effect linear models indicated that EFT improved mental health (F=79.24, p=0) and health-related quality of life (F=13.89, p=0.001), decreased somatic symptoms (F=5.81, p=0.02), anxiety/insomnia (F=24.03, p<0.001), social dysfunction (F=21.59, p<0.001), frequency and severity of respiratory symptoms (F=20.38, p<0.001), and increased lymphocyte proliferation with nonspecific mitogens Concanavalin A (Con A) (F=14.32, p=0.001) and Phytohemagglutinin (PHA) (F=12.35, p=0.002), and peripheral blood IL-17 (F=9.11, p=0.006). This study provides an initial indication that EFT may be a new therapeutic approach for improving psychological and immunological factors. Article Published Date : Jan 31, 2015

Anxiety and Anger Symptoms in Hwabyung Patients Improved More following 4 Weeks of the Emotional Freedom Technique Program Compared to the Progressive Muscle Relaxation Program: A Randomized Controlled Trial. 📎

Abstract Title: Anxiety and Anger Symptoms in Hwabyung Patients Improved More following 4 Weeks of the Emotional Freedom Technique Program Compared to the Progressive Muscle Relaxation Program: A Randomized Controlled Trial. Abstract Source: Evid Based Complement Alternat Med. 2015 ;2015:203612. Epub 2015 Oct 11. PMID: 26539218 Abstract Author(s): Jin Woo Suh, Sun Yong Chung, Sang Young Kim, Jung Hwan Lee, Jong Woo Kim Article Affiliation: Jin Woo Suh Abstract: Background. The Emotional Freedom Technique (EFT) is a meridian-based psychological therapy. The present clinical trial investigates the effectiveness of EFT as a new treatment option for Hwabyung (HB) patients experiencing anger and compares the efficacy to the Progressive Muscle Relaxation (PMR), the conventional meditation technique. Methods. The EFT and progressive muscle relaxation (PMR) methods were performed on 27 HB patients, and their capacities to alleviate anxiety, anger, and emotional status were compared. After a 4-week program, a survey was conducted; patients then completed a self-training program for 4 weeks, followed by a second survey. Results. During the initial 4 weeks, the EFT group experienced a significant decrease in the HB symptom scale, anger state, and paranoia ideation (p<0.05). Over the entire 9-week interval, there were significant decreases in the HB symptom scale, anxiety state, anger state, anger trait, somatization, anxiety, hostility, and so on in EFT group (p<0.05). Conclusion. The EFT group showed improved psychological symptoms and physical symptoms greater than those observed in the PMR group. EFT more effectively alleviated HB symptoms compared to PMR. EFT group showed better maintenance during self-training, suggesting good model of self-control treatment in HB patients. Article Published Date : Dec 31, 2014

Effect of the emotional freedom technique on perceived stress, quality of life, and cortisol salivary levels in tension-type headache sufferers: a randomized controlled trial.

Abstract Title: Effect of the emotional freedom technique on perceived stress, quality of life, and cortisol salivary levels in tension-type headache sufferers: a randomized controlled trial. Abstract Source: Explore (NY). 2013 Mar-Apr;9(2):91-9. PMID: 23452711 Abstract Author(s): Anastasia M Bougea, Nick Spandideas, Evangelos C Alexopoulos, Thomas Thomaides, George P Chrousos, Christina Darviri Article Affiliation: Anastasia M Bougea Abstract: OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the short-term effects of the emotional freedom technique (EFT) on tension-type headache (TTH) sufferers. DESIGN: We used a parallel-group design, with participants randomly assigned to the emotional freedom intervention (n = 19) or a control arm (standard care n = 16). SETTING: The study was conducted at the outpatient Headache Clinic at the Korgialenio Benakio Hospital of Athens. PARTICIPANTS: Thirty-five patients meeting criteria for frequent TTH according to International Headache Society guidelines were enrolled. INTERVENTION: Participants were instructed to use the EFT method twice a day for two months. OUTCOME MEASURES: Study measures included the Perceived Stress Scale, the Multidimensional Health Locus of Control Scale, and the Short-Form questionnaire-36. Salivary cortisol levels and the frequency and intensity of headache episodes were also assessed. RESULTS: Within the treatment arm, perceived stress, scores for all Short-Form questionnaire-36 subscales, and the frequency and intensity of the headache episodes were all significantly reduced. No differences in cortisol levels were found in any group before and after the intervention. CONCLUSIONS: EFT was reported to benefit patients with TTH. This randomized controlled trial shows promising results for not only the frequency and severity of headaches but also other lifestyle parameters. Article Published Date : Feb 28, 2013

The effect of emotional freedom techniques on stress biochemistry: a randomized controlled trial.

Abstract Title: The effect of emotional freedom techniques on stress biochemistry: a randomized controlled trial. Abstract Source: J Nerv Ment Dis. 2012 Oct ;200(10):891-6. PMID: 22986277 Abstract Author(s): Dawson Church, Garret Yount, Audrey J Brooks Article Affiliation: Foundation for Epigenetic Medicine, Fulton, CA 95439, USA. This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. Abstract: This study examined the changes in cortisol levels and psychological distress symptoms of 83 nonclinical subjects receiving a single hour long intervention. Subjects were randomly assigned to either an emotional freedom technique (EFT) group, a psychotherapy group receiving a supportive interviews (SI), or a no treatment (NT) group. Salivary cortisol assays were performed immediately before and 30 minutes after the intervention. Psychological distress symptoms were assessed using the symptom assessment-45. The EFT group showed statistically significant improvements in anxiety (-58.34%, p<0.05), depression (-49.33%, p<0.002), the overall severity of symptoms (-50.5%, p<0.001), and symptom breadth (-41.93%, p<0.001). The EFT group experienced a significant decrease in cortisol level (-24.39%; SE, 2.62) compared with the decrease observed in the SI (-14.25%; SE, 2.61) and NT (-14.44%; SE, 2.67) groups (p<0.03). The decrease in cortisol levels in the EFT group mirrored the observed improvement in psychological distress. Article Published Date : Sep 30, 2012

The immediate effect of a brief energy psychology intervention (Emotional Freedom Techniques) on specific phobias: a pilot study.

Abstract Title: The immediate effect of a brief energy psychology intervention (Emotional Freedom Techniques) on specific phobias: a pilot study. Abstract Source: Explore (NY). 2011 May-Jun;7(3):155-61. PMID: 21571234 Abstract Author(s): Martha M Salas, Audrey J Brooks, Jack E Rowe Article Affiliation: Corpus Christi Independent School District, TX, USA. Abstract: BACKGROUND: Specific phobia is one of the most prevalent anxiety disorders. Emotional Freedom Techniques (EFT) has been shown to improve anxiety symptoms; however, their application to specific phobias has received limited attention. OBJECTIVE: This pilot study examined whether EFT, a brief exposure therapy that combines cognitive and somatic elements, had an immediate effect on the reduction of anxiety and behavior associated with specific phobias. DESIGN: The study utilized a crossover design with participants randomly assigned to either diaphragmatic breathing or EFT as the first treatment. SETTING: The study was conducted at a regional university in the Southwestern United States. PARTICIPANTS: Twenty-two students meeting criteria for a phobic response to a specific stimulus (≥8 on an 11-point subjective units of distress scale). INTERVENTION: Participants completed a total of five two-minute rounds in each treatment intervention. OUTCOME MEASURES: Study measures included a behavioral approach test (BAT), Subjective Units of Distress Scale (SUDS), and Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI). RESULTS: Emotional Freedom Techniques significantly reduced phobia-related anxiety (BAI P = .042; SUDS P = .002) and ability to approach the feared stimulus (BAT P = .046) whether presented as an initial treatment or following diaphragmatic breathing. When presented as the initial treatment, the effects of EFT remained through the presentation of the comparison intervention. CONCLUSIONS: The efficacy of EFT in treating specific phobias demonstrated in several earlier studies is corroborated by the current investigation. Comparison studies between EFT and the most effective established therapies for treating specific phobias are recommended. Article Published Date : Apr 30, 2011

Pilot study of emotional freedom techniques, wholistic hybrid derived from eye movement desensitization and reprocessing and emotional freedom technique, and cognitive behavioral therapy for treatment of test anxiety in university students.

Abstract Title: Pilot study of emotional freedom techniques, wholistic hybrid derived from eye movement desensitization and reprocessing and emotional freedom technique, and cognitive behavioral therapy for treatment of test anxiety in university students. Abstract Source: Explore (NY). 2009 Nov-Dec;5(6):338-40. PMID: 19913760 Abstract Author(s): Daniel J Benor, Karen Ledger, Loren Toussaint, Geoffrey Hett, Daniel Zaccaro Article Affiliation: Association for Comprehensive Energy Psychology, Haverford, PA, USA. Abstract: OBJECTIVE: This study explored test anxiety benefits of wholistic hybrid derived from eye movement desensitization and reprocessing and Emotional Freedom Techniques (WHEE), Emotional Freedom Techniques (EFTs), and cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT). PARTICIPANTS: Canadian university students with severe or moderate test anxiety participated. METHODS: A controlled trial of WHEE (n = 5), EFT (n = 5), and CBT (n = 5) was conducted. Standardized anxiety measures included the Test Anxiety Inventory and Hopkins Symptom Checklist-21. RESULTS: Despite small sample size, significant reductions in test anxiety were found for all three treatments. In only two sessions, WHEE and EFT achieved the same benefits as CBT did in five sessions. Participants reported high satisfaction with all treatments. Emotional freedom techniques and WHEE participants successfully transferred their self-treatment skills to other stressful areas of their lives. CONCLUSIONS: Both WHEE and EFT show promise as feasible treatments for test anxiety. Article Published Date : Oct 31, 2009

Evaluation of a meridian-based intervention, Emotional Freedom Techniques (EFT), for reducing specific phobias of small animals.

Abstract Title: Evaluation of a meridian-based intervention, Emotional Freedom Techniques (EFT), for reducing specific phobias of small animals. Abstract Source: J Clin Psychol. 2003 Sep ;59(9):943-66. PMID: 12945061 Abstract Author(s): Steve Wells, Kathryn Polglase, Henry B Andrews, Patricia Carrington, A Harvey Baker Article Affiliation: Curtin University of Technology of Western Australia. Abstract: This study explored whether a meridian-based procedure, Emotional Freedom Techniques (EFT), can reduce specific phobias of small animals under laboratory-controlled conditions. Randomly assigned participants were treated individually for 30 min with EFT (n = 18) or a comparison condition, diaphragmatic breathing (DB) (n = 17). ANOVAS revealed that EFT produced significantly greater improvement than did DB behaviorally and on three self-report measures, but not on pulse rate. The greater improvement for EFT was maintained, and possibly enhanced, at six- to nine-months follow-up on the behavioral measure. These findings suggest that a single treatment session using EFT to reduce specific phobias can produce valid behavioral and subjective effects. Some limitations of the study also are noted and clarifying research suggested. Article Published Date : Aug 31, 2003
Therapeutic Actions Emotional Freedom Technique

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[Mothers Talk. Part Unless Told of Voluntary Abortion].

Related Articles [Mothers Talk. Part Unless Told of Voluntary Abortion]. Cuad Bioet. 2017 Jan-Apr;28(92):55-70 Authors: Hernández Garre JM, Aznar Mula IM, Echevarría Pérez P Abstract The aim of the study was to investigate the experiences linked to the post-abortion syndrome in mothers who have had a voluntary abortion. A phenomenological qualitative approach to collect the experiences of mothers who had voluntarily interrupted their pregnancy was used. The research technique was the semistructured interviews with women who had contacted different association's help of the Murcia region for support after experiencing symptoms consistent with post-abortion syndrome. The testimonies show feminist or utilitarian arguments to justify the decision to abort, they talk about a system, to some extent, mercantilist that has no real intention of giving real life choices. Experience shows that far from lived as an act of female freedom is experienced traumatically, developed symptoms following the sense of loss. In this context, the resource spiritual becomes the best tool to expiate guilt. The experience of abortion does not improve the lives of women; far from it is a trauma that can be avoided with proper advice to avoid the tragedy of abortion. PMID: 28342434 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]