CYBERMED LIFE - ORGANIC  & NATURAL LIVING

Cybermedlife - Therapeutic Actions Exercise Strenuous

Beyond recreational physical activity: examining occupational and household activity, transportation activity, and sedentary behavior in relation to postmenopausal breast cancer risk. 📎

Abstract Title: Beyond recreational physical activity: examining occupational and household activity, transportation activity, and sedentary behavior in relation to postmenopausal breast cancer risk. Abstract Source: Am J Public Health. 2010 Sep 23. Epub 2010 Sep 23. PMID: 20864719 Abstract Author(s): Stephanie M George, Melinda L Irwin, Charles E Matthews, Susan T Mayne, Mitchell H Gail, Steven C Moore, Demetrius Albanes, Rachel Ballard-Barbash, Albert R Hollenbeck, Arthur Schatzkin, Michael F Leitzmann Article Affiliation: National Cancer Institute, Yale School of Public Health. Abstract: Objectives. We prospectively examined nonrecreational physical activity and sedentary behavior in relation to breast cancer risk among 97039 postmenopausal women in the National Institutes of Health-AARP Diet and Health Study. Methods. We identified 2866 invasive and 570 in situ breast cancer cases recorded between 1996 and 2003 and used Cox proportional hazards regression to estimate multivariate relative risks (RRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Results. Routine activity during the day at work or at home that included heavy lifting or carrying versus mostly sitting was associated with reduced risk of invasive breast cancer (RR=0.62; 95% CI=0.42, 0.91; Ptrend=.024). Conclusions. Routine activity during the day at work or home may be related to reduced invasive breast cancer risk. Domains outside of recreation time may be attractive targets for increasing physical activity and reducing sedentary behavior among postmenopausal women. (Am J Public Health. Published online ahead of print September 23, 2010: e1-e8. doi:10.2105/AJPH.2009.180828). Note: RR=.62 = 38% relative risk reduction Article Published Date : Sep 23, 2010

Effects of beta-alanine supplementation and high-intensity interval training on endurance performance and body composition in men; a double-blind trial. 📎

Abstract Title: Effects of beta-alanine supplementation and high-intensity interval training on endurance performance and body composition in men; a double-blind trial. Abstract Source: J Int Soc Sports Nutr. 2009;6:5. Epub 2009 Feb 11. PMID: 19210788 Abstract Author(s): Abbie E Smith, Ashley A Walter, Jennifer L Graef, Kristina L Kendall, Jordan R Moon, Christopher M Lockwood, David H Fukuda, Travis W Beck, Joel T Cramer, Jeffrey R Stout Article Affiliation: Metabolic and Body Composition Laboratory, Department of Health and Exercise Science, University of Oklahoma, Norman, OK 73019, USA. This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.. Abstract: ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Intermittent bouts of high-intensity exercise result in diminished stores of energy substrates, followed by an accumulation of metabolites, promoting chronic physiological adaptations. In addition, beta-alanine has been accepted has an effective physiological hydrogen ion (H+) buffer. Concurrent high-intensity interval training (HIIT) and beta-alanine supplementation may result in greater adaptations than HIIT alone. The purpose of the current study was to evaluate the effects of combining beta-alanine supplementation with high-intensity interval training (HIIT) on endurance performance and aerobic metabolism in recreationally active college-aged men. METHODS: Forty-six men (Age: 22.2 +/- 2.7 yrs; Ht: 178.1 +/- 7.4 cm; Wt: 78.7 +/- 11.9; VO2peak: 3.3 +/- 0.59 l.min-1) were assessed for peak O2 utilization (VO2peak), time to fatigue (VO2TTE), ventilatory threshold (VT), and total work done at 110% of pre-training VO2peak (TWD). In a double-blind fashion, all subjects were randomly assigned into one either a placebo (PL - 16.5 g dextrose powder per packet; n = 18) or beta-alanine (BA - 1.5 g beta-alanine plus 15 g dextrose powder per packet; n = 18) group. All subjects supplemented four times per day (total of 6 g/day) for the first 21-days, followed by two times per day (3 g/day) for the subsequent 21 days, and engaged in a total of six weeks of HIIT training consisting of 5-6 bouts of a 2:1 minute cycling work to rest ratio. RESULTS: Significant improvements in VO2peak, VO2TTE, and TWD after three weeks of training were displayed (p<0.05). Increases in VO2peak, VO2TTE, TWD and lean body mass were only significant for the BA group after the second three weeks of training. CONCLUSION: The use of HIIT to induce significant aerobic improvements is effective and efficient. Chronic BA supplementation may further enhance HIIT, improving endurance performance and lean body mass. Article Published Date : Jan 01, 2009

A low-fat diet and/or strenuous exercise alters the IGF axis in vivo and reduces prostate tumor cell growth in vitro.

Abstract Title: A low-fat diet and/or strenuous exercise alters the IGF axis in vivo and reduces prostate tumor cell growth in vitro. Abstract Source: Prostate. 2003 Aug 1;56(3):201-6. PMID: 12772189 Abstract Author(s): R James Barnard, Tung H Ngo, Pak-Shan Leung, William J Aronson, Lawrence A Golding Abstract: BACKGROUND: Prostate cancer is the most common solid-tumor cancer in US males but is rare in Asian males. When Asian men adopt the US lifestyle, clinical prostate cancer increases greatly. Epidemiological data from men in the US indicate that regular activity may reduce the risk for prostate cancer. METHODS: Serum was obtained from three groups of similar-aged men, Control, Diet and Exercise, and Exercise alone were used to stimulate LNCaP cells in culture. Growth and apoptosis of tumor cells were measured. Serum samples were also used to measure insulin, IGF-1, IGFBP-1. RESULTS: The Diet and Exercise and the Exercise alone groups had lower serum insulin and IGF-1 but higher IGFBP-1 compared to Controls. LNCaP cell growth was reduced in both groups compared to Control and there was a major increase in apoptosis of tumor cells. CONCLUSIONS: A low-fat diet and/or intensive exercise results in change in serum hormones and growth factors in vivo that can reduce growth and induce apoptosis of LNCaP prostate tumor cells in vitro. Copyright 2003 Wiley-Liss, Inc. Article Published Date : Aug 01, 2003
Therapeutic Actions EXERCISE Strenuous

NCBI pubmed

Hypoxic Preconditioning Attenuates Reoxygenation-Induced Skeletal Muscle Dysfunction in Aged Pulmonary TNF-α Overexpressing Mice.

Related Articles Hypoxic Preconditioning Attenuates Reoxygenation-Induced Skeletal Muscle Dysfunction in Aged Pulmonary TNF-α Overexpressing Mice. Front Physiol. 2018;9:1720 Authors: Chuang CC, Zhou T, Olfert IM, Zuo L Abstract Aim: Skeletal muscle subjected to hypoxia followed by reoxygenation is susceptible to injury and subsequent muscle function decline. This phenomenon can be observed in the diaphragm during strenuous exercise or in pulmonary diseases such as chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases (COPD). Previous studies have shown that PO2 cycling or hypoxic preconditioning (HPC), as it can also be referred to as, protects muscle function via mechanisms involving reactive oxygen species (ROS). However, this HPC protection has not been fully elucidated in aged pulmonary TNF-α overexpressing (Tg+) mice (a COPD-like model). We hypothesize that HPC can exert protection on the diaphragms of Tg+ mice during reoxygenation through pathways involving ROS/phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/protein kinase B (Akt)/extracellular signal regulated kinase (ERK), as well as the downstream activation of mitochondrial ATP-sensitive potassium channel (mitoKATP) and inhibition of mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mPTP). Methods: Isolated Tg+ diaphragm muscle strips were pre-treated with inhibitors for ROS, PI3K, Akt, ERK, or a combination of mitoKATP inhibitor and mPTP opener, respectively, prior to HPC. Another two groups of muscles were treated with either mitoKATP activator or mPTP inhibitor without HPC. Muscles were treated with 30-min hypoxia, followed by 15-min reoxygenation. Data were analyzed by multi-way ANOVA and expressed as means ± SE. Results: Muscle treated with HPC showed improved muscle function during reoxygenation (n = 5, p < 0.01). Inhibition of ROS, PI3K, Akt, or ERK abolished the protective effect of HPC. Simultaneous inhibition of mitoKATP and activation of mPTP also diminished HPC effects. By contrast, either the opening of mitoKATP channel or the closure of mPTP provided a similar protective effect to HPC by alleviating muscle function decline, suggesting that mitochondria play a role in HPC initiation (n = 5; p < 0.05). Conclusion: Hypoxic preconditioning may protect respiratory skeletal muscle function in Tg+ mice during reoxygenation through redox-sensitive signaling cascades and regulations of mitochondrial channels. PMID: 30622474 [PubMed]
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