CYBERMED LIFE - ORGANIC  & NATURAL LIVING

Cybermedlife - Therapeutic Actions Relaxation Therapy

Beneficial effects of treatment with sensory isolation in flotation-tank as a preventive health-care intervention - a randomized controlled pilot trial. 📎

Abstract Title: Beneficial effects of treatment with sensory isolation in flotation-tank as a preventive health-care intervention - a randomized controlled pilot trial. Abstract Source: BMC Complement Altern Med. 2014 ;14:417. Epub 2014 Oct 25. PMID: 25344737 Abstract Author(s): Anette Kjellgren, Jessica Westman Article Affiliation: Anette Kjellgren Abstract: BACKGROUND: Sensory isolation in a flotation tank is a method known for inducing deep relaxation and subsequent positive health effects for patients suffering from e.g. stress or muscle tensions pains. Very few studies have investigated this method as a preventive health-care intervention. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects in healthy participants after receiving a series of flotation tank treatment. METHODS: Sixty-five participants (14 men and 51 women) who were all part of a cooperative-health project initiated by their individual companies, were randomized to either a wait-list control group or a flotation tank treatment group where they participated in a seven weeks flotation program with a total of twelve flotation sessions. Questionnaires measuring psychological and physiological variables such as stress and energy, depression and anxiety, optimism, pain, stress, sleep quality, mindfulness, and degree of altered states of consciousness were used. Data were analysed by two-way mixed MANOVA and repeated measures ANOVA. RESULTS: Stress, depression, anxiety, and worst pain were significantly decreased whereas optimism and sleep quality significantly increased for the flotation-REST group. No significant results for the control group were seen. There was also a significant correlation between mindfulness in daily life and degree of altered states of consciousness during the relaxation in the flotation tank. CONCLUSIONS: It was concluded that flotation-REST has beneficial effects on relatively healthy participants. TRIAL REGISTRATION: Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry: ACTRN12613000483752. Article Published Date : Dec 31, 2013

Parkinson's disease tremor is diminished with relaxation guided imagery.

Abstract Title: Parkinson's disease tremor is diminished with relaxation guided imagery. Abstract Source: Mov Disord. 2009 Oct 30;24(14):2059-62. PMID: 19768725 Abstract Author(s): Ilana Schlesinger, Orna Benyakov, Ilana Erikh, Suheir Suraiya, Yitzhak Schiller Abstract: Patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) may have pronounced tremor that exacerbates during stress. To determine whether PD tremor improves with relaxation guided imagery (RGI) and relaxing music. Twenty patients with PD with moderate to severe tremor participated in sessions where relaxation techniques were implemented. Tremor was objectively monitored using an accelerometer. RGI dramatically decreased tremor in all 20 patients (baseline 270.38 +/- 85.82 vs. RGI 35.57 +/- 43.90 movements per minute P < 0.0001). In 15 patients, RGI completely abolished tremor for 1-13 min. Average tremor activity remained significantly below baseline both 15 min and 30 min after RGI was discontinued (P < 0.001). Patients reported improvement lasting 2-14 hours (mean 6.8 +/- 3.8). Relaxing music significantly reduced tremor but to a lesser degree than RGI (220.04 +/- 106.53 movements per minute P = 0.01). Self-relaxation had no significant effect on tremor. RGI can supplement conventional medical treatments for tremor in patients with PD on best medical treatment. (c) 2009 Movement Disorder Society. Article Published Date : Oct 30, 2009

Effectiveness of applying progressive muscle relaxation technique on quality of life of patients with multiple sclerosis.

Abstract Title: Effectiveness of applying progressive muscle relaxation technique on quality of life of patients with multiple sclerosis. Abstract Source: J Clin Nurs. 2009 Aug;18(15):2171-9. PMID: 19583649 Abstract Author(s): Somayeh Ghafari, Fazlolah Ahmadi, Masoud Nabavi, Kazemnejad Anoshirvan, Robabe Memarian, Mohamad Rafatbakhsh Abstract: AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: To identify the effects of applying Progressive Muscle Relaxation Technique on Quality of Life of patients with multiple Sclerosis. BACKGROUND: In view of the growing caring options in Multiple Sclerosis, improvement of quality of life has become increasingly relevant as a caring intervention. Complementary therapies are widely used by multiple sclerosis patients and Progressive Muscle Relaxation Technique is a form of complementary therapies. DESIGN: Quasi-experimental study. METHOD: Multiple Sclerosis patients (n = 66) were selected with no probability sampling then assigned to experimental and control groups (33 patients in each group). Means of data collection included: Individual Information Questionnaire, SF-8 Health Survey, Self-reported checklist. PMRT performed for 63 sessions by experimental group during two months but no intervention was done for control group. Statistical analysis was done by SPSS software. RESULTS: Student t-test showed that there was no significant difference between two groups in mean scores of health-related quality of life before the study but this test showed a significant difference between two groups, one and two months after intervention (p < 0.05). anova test with repeated measurements showed that there is a significant difference in mean score of whole and dimensions of health-related quality of life between two groups in three times (p < 0.05). CONCLUSIONS: Although this study provides modest support for the effectiveness of Progressive Muscle Relaxation Technique on quality of life of multiple sclerosis patients, further research is required to determine better methods to promote quality of life of patients suffer multiple sclerosis and other chronic disease. RELEVANCE TO CLINICAL PRACTICE: Progressive Muscle Relaxation Technique is practically feasible and is associated with increase of life quality of multiple sclerosis patients; so that health professionals need to update their knowledge about complementary therapies. Article Published Date : Aug 01, 2009

Functional relaxation and guided imagery as complementary therapy in asthma: a randomized controlled clinical trial.

Abstract Title: Functional relaxation and guided imagery as complementary therapy in asthma: a randomized controlled clinical trial. Abstract Source: Psychother Psychosom. 2009;78(4):233-9. Epub 2009 Apr 28. PMID: 19401624 Abstract Author(s): C Lahmann, M Nickel, T Schuster, N Sauer, J Ronel, M Noll-Hussong, K Tritt, D Nowak, F Rohricht, T Loew Abstract: BACKGROUND: Asthma is a frequently disabling and almost invariably distressing disease that has a high overall prevalence. Although relaxation techniques and hypnotherapeutic interventions have proven their effectiveness in numerous trials, relaxation therapies are still not recommended in treatment guidelines due to a lack of methodological quality in many of the trials. Therefore, this study aims to investigate the efficacy of the brief relaxation technique of functional relaxation (FR) and guided imagery (GI) in adult asthmatics in a randomized controlled trial. METHODS: 64 patients with extrinsic bronchial asthma were treated over a 4-week period and assessed at baseline, after treatment and after 4 months, for follow-up. 16 patients completed FR, 14 GI, 15 both FR and GI (FR/GI) and 13 received a placebo relaxation technique as the control intervention (CI). The forced expiratory volume in the first second (FEV(1)) as well as the specific airway resistance (sR(aw)) were employed as primary outcome measures. RESULTS: Participation in FR, GI and FR/GI led to increases in FEV(1) (% predicted) of 7.6 +/- 13.2, 3.3 +/- 9.8, and 8.3 +/- 21.0, respectively, as compared to -1.8 +/- 11.1 in the CI group at the end of the therapy. After follow-up, the increases in FEV(1) were 6.9 +/- 10.3 in the FR group, 4.4 +/- 7.3 in the GI and 4.5 +/- 8.1 in the FR/GI, compared to -2.8 +/- 9.2 in the CI. Improvements in sR(aw) (% predicted) were in keeping with the changes in FEV(1) in all groups. CONCLUSIONS: Our study confirms a positive effect of FR on respiratory parameters and suggests a clinically relevant long-term benefit from FR as a nonpharmacological and complementary therapy treatment option. 2009 S. Karger AG, Basel. Article Published Date : Jan 01, 2009

Effect of two yoga-based relaxation techniques on memory scores and state anxiety. 📎

Abstract Title: Effect of two yoga-based relaxation techniques on memory scores and state anxiety. Abstract Source: Biopsychosoc Med. 2009;3:8. Epub 2009 Aug 13. PMID: 19674483 Abstract Author(s): Pailoor Subramanya, Shirley Telles Abstract: ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: A yoga practice involving cycles of yoga postures and supine rest (called cyclic meditation) was previously shown to improve performance in attention tasks more than relaxation in the corpse posture (shavasana). This was ascribed to reduced anxiety, though this was not assessed. METHODS: In fifty-seven male volunteers (group average age +/- S.D., 26.6 +/- 4.5 years) the immediate effect of two yoga relaxation techniques was studied on memory and state anxiety. All participants were assessed before and after (i) Cyclic meditation (CM) practiced for 22:30 minutes on one day and (ii) an equal duration of Supine rest (SR) or the corpse posture (shavasana), on another day. Sections of the Wechsler memory scale (WMS) were used to assess; (i) attention and concentration (digit span forward and backward), and (ii) associate learning. State anxiety was assessed using Spielberger's State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI). RESULTS: There was a significant improvement in the scores of all sections of the WMS studied after both CM and SR, but, the magnitude of change was more after CM compared to after SR. The state anxiety scores decreased after both CM and SR, with a greater magnitude of decrease after CM. There was no correlation between percentage change in memory scores and state anxiety for either session. CONCLUSION: A cyclical combination of yoga postures and supine rest in CM improved memory scores immediately after the practice and decreased state anxiety more than rest in a classical yoga relaxation posture (shavasana). Article Published Date : Jan 01, 2009

Relaxation and guided imagery in Hispanic persons diagnosed with fibromyalgia: a pilot study.

Abstract Title: Relaxation and guided imagery in Hispanic persons diagnosed with fibromyalgia: a pilot study. Abstract Source: Fam Community Health. 2008 Jul-Sep;31(3):204-12. PMID: 18552601 Abstract Author(s): Victoria Menzies, Sunny Kim Article Affiliation: School of Nursing, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA 23298, USA. This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. Abstract: Fibromyalgia (FM) is a chronic pain disorder affecting 2% of the population in the United States. Another 16 million Hispanics suffer from generically identified rheumatic diseases that likely include FM. Because there are few reported studies of Hispanics with FM, a pilot study using a repeated-measures pretest-posttest design investigated the effects of a 10-week mind-body intervention (visual imagery with relaxation) on symptom management. The change in means from baseline to week 10 demonstrated improvement in self-efficacy for managing pain and other symptoms and functional status. Visual imagery with relaxation is a mind-body intervention that may be used for symptom management in this population. Article Published Date : Jul 01, 2008

Does relaxation education in anxious primigravid Iranian women influence adverse pregnancy outcomes?: a randomized controlled trial.

Abstract Title: Does relaxation education in anxious primigravid Iranian women influence adverse pregnancy outcomes?: a randomized controlled trial. Abstract Source: J Perinat Neonatal Nurs. 2006 Apr-Jun;20(2):138-46. PMID: 16714913 Abstract Author(s): Farideh Bastani, Alireza Hidarnia, Kristen S Montgomery, Maria E Aguilar-Vafaei, Anoshirvan Kazemnejad Abstract: Maternal anxiety and stress are found to be predictors of adverse pregnancy outcomes, including low birth weight and prematurity. OBJECTIVE: The aim of the study was to determine whether relaxation education in anxious pregnant Iranian women in their first pregnancy affects selected pregnancy outcomes, including birth weight, preterm birth, and surgical delivery rate. SUBJECTS: A total of 110 obstetrically and medically low-risk primigravid women in Iran with a high anxiety level demonstrated by Spielberger's State-Trait Anxiety Inventory were randomly assigned into experimental and control groups. METHOD: In this randomized controlled trial, the experimental group received routine prenatal care along with 7-week applied relaxation training sessions, while the control group received only routine prenatal care. Anxiety and perceived stress were measured by pre-educational and post-educational intervention. Data related to pregnancy outcomes include birth weight, gestational age at birth, and type of delivery. RESULTS: Significant reductions in low birth weight, cesarean section, and/or instrumental extraction were found in the experimental group compared with the control group. No significant differences were found in the rate of preterm birth. CONCLUSION: The findings suggest beneficial effects of nurse-led relaxation education sessions during the prenatal period. This intervention could serve as a resource for improving pregnancy outcomes in women with high anxiety. Article Published Date : Apr 01, 2006

The impact of abbreviated progressive muscle relaxation on salivary cortisol and salivary immunoglobulin A (sIgA).

Abstract Title: The impact of abbreviated progressive muscle relaxation on salivary cortisol and salivary immunoglobulin A (sIgA). Abstract Source: Appl Psychophysiol Biofeedback. 2005 Dec;30(4):375-87. PMID: 16385425 Abstract Author(s): Laura A Pawlow, Gary E Jones Abstract: This study examined the acute effects of relaxation training on salivary cortisol and salivary immunoglobulin A (sIgA). Members of age- and gender-matched undergraduate student pairs were randomly assigned to an experimental or control group. Forty-one experimental subjects were led through Abbreviated Progressive Relaxation Training (APRT) during a 1-h laboratory session; 14 control subjects merely sat quietly in the laboratory for an equal amount of time. All subjects provided pre- and post-intervention saliva samples and self-report data on state anxiety, perceived stress, and relaxation levels. Heart rate was also monitored immediately before and after APRT or quiet sitting. Results indicated that a brief relaxation exercise led to experimental subjects having significantly lower levels of post-intervention salivary cortisol (p = .036) and significantly higher levels of post-intervention sIgA concentration (p<.001) and secretion rate (p<.001) than control subjects. The data suggest that relaxation training may play a role in immunoenhancement. Article Published Date : Dec 01, 2005

The impact of abbreviated progressive muscle relaxation on salivary cortisol.

Abstract Title: The impact of abbreviated progressive muscle relaxation on salivary cortisol. Abstract Source: Biol Psychol. 2002;60(1):1-16. PMID: 12100842 Abstract Author(s): Laura A Pawlow, Gary E Jones Abstract: The purpose of this study was to examine whether acute relaxation training, conducted on two separate occasions, would be associated with reliable reductions in subjective and physiological indices of stress. Forty-six experimental subjects were led through Abbreviated Progressive Relaxation Training (APRT) exercises during two laboratory sessions spaced exactly 1 week apart. Fifteen control subjects experienced two laboratory sessions where they sat quietly for an equal amount of time. Results indicated that a brief relaxation exercise led to experimental subjects having significantly lower levels of post-intervention heart rate, state anxiety, perceived stress, and salivary cortisol than control subjects, as well as increased levels of self-report levels of relaxation. The results of this study may have implications for the use of relaxation training in enhancing immune function. Article Published Date : Jan 01, 2002
Therapeutic Actions Relaxation Therapy

NCBI pubmed

Metformin prevents vascular damage in hypertension through the AMPK/ER stress pathway.

Related Articles Metformin prevents vascular damage in hypertension through the AMPK/ER stress pathway. Hypertens Res. 2019 Jan 21;: Authors: Chen C, Kassan A, Castañeda D, Gabani M, Choi SK, Kassan M Abstract Metformin is an antidiabetic drug. However, the pleiotropic beneficial effects of metformin in nondiabetic models still need to be defined. The objective of this study is to investigate the effect of metformin on angiotensin II (Ang II)-induced hypertension and cardiovascular diseases. Mice were infused with Ang II (400 ng/kg per min) with or without metformin for 2 weeks. Mice infused with angiotensin II displayed an increase in blood pressure associated with enhanced vascular endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress markers, which were blunted after metformin treatment. Moreover, hypertension-induced reduction in phosphorylated AMPK, endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOs) phosphorylation, and endothelium-dependent relaxation (EDR) in mesenteric resistance arteries (MRA) were rescued after metformin treatment. Infusion of ER stress inducer (tunicamycin, Tun) in control mice induced ER stress in MRA and reduced phosphorylation of AMPK, eNOS synthase phosphorylation, and EDR in MRA without affecting systolic blood pressure (SBP). All these factors were reversed subsequently with metformin treatment. ER stress inhibition by metformin improves vascular function in hypertension. Therefore, metformin could be a potential therapy for cardiovascular diseases in hypertension independent of its effects on diabetes. PMID: 30664704 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

"Teaching Moments" in Psychotherapy: Addressing Emergent Life Events Using Strategies From a Modular Evidence-Based Treatment.

Related Articles "Teaching Moments" in Psychotherapy: Addressing Emergent Life Events Using Strategies From a Modular Evidence-Based Treatment. Behav Ther. 2019 Jan;50(1):101-114 Authors: Guan K, Boustani MM, Chorpita BF Abstract Emergent life events (ELEs) are unexpected, acute client stressors reported in psychotherapy sessions that are associated with reduced evidence-based treatment (EBT) integrity and client progress. As a potential solution, this study examined the extent to which ELEs could be appropriately addressed using existing EBT strategies. Participants were 34 low-income youth (ages 5-15, 50% male, 85% Latino) seen by 18 therapy providers in the modular EBT condition (MATCH) of a community effectiveness trial. MATCH experts rated descriptions of 75 ELEs from therapy sessions on how well they might be addressed clinically by any of MATCH's 33 strategies for youth anxiety, depression, trauma, or conduct problems (i.e., "addressability"). MATCH-expert ratings were compared with observationally coded provider responses to ELEs. Results revealed that when assuming the presence of youth and caregiver in session, two-thirds of ELEs were identified as fully addressable and nearly all ELEs (96%) were partially addressable. ELEs related to family issues were most common but least likely to be addressable. Problem Solving and Relaxation skills could address the greatest percentage (87%) of ELEs. The most common supplemental content not explicitly prescribed in MATCH, but identified as necessary to fully address ELEs, was "assessing and empathic listening." Provider responses were often incongruent with MATCH-expert raters regarding which strategies to use for which ELEs. In summary, most ELEs reported in a diverse community sample could be theoretically harnessed as "teaching moments" for skills within an existing, multi-problem EBT. However, providers may benefit from development of a structured resource to guide them in choosing the most effective response when these unexpected events arise. PMID: 30661551 [PubMed - in process]

Eulophia macrobulbon extract relaxes rat isolated pulmonary artery and protects against monocrotaline-induced pulmonary arterial hypertension.

Related Articles Eulophia macrobulbon extract relaxes rat isolated pulmonary artery and protects against monocrotaline-induced pulmonary arterial hypertension. Phytomedicine. 2018 Nov 15;50:157-165 Authors: Wisutthathum S, Demougeot C, Totoson P, Adthapanyawanich K, Ingkaninan K, Temkitthawon P, Chootip K Abstract BACKGROUND: Extract of the wild orchid, Eulophia macrobulbon (EM) inhibits phosphodiesterase5 (PDE5) suggesting it could preferentially dilate the pulmonary vasculature. PURPOSE AND STUDY DESIGN: To pharmacologically characterize the vascular actions of EM ethanolic extract and its active compound, 1-(4'-hydroxybenzyl)-4,8-dimethoxyphenanthrene-2,7-diol using isolated pulmonary arteries (PA) from rats having pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) induced by monocrotaline (MCT). PA were fixed and prepared for histology. RESULTS: EM extract relaxed PA (EC50 = 0.17  mg/ml, Emax ∼ 94%) but less so for aorta (EC50 = 0.51 mg/ml, Emax ∼ 62%), suggesting some selectivity towards the pulmonary circulation. PA vasorelaxation was reduced by endothelial removal or NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester, but unaffected by indomethacin, apamin +charybdotoxin, 4-aminopyridine, glibenclamide, iberiotoxin, or 1H - [1,2,4]oxadiazolo[4,3-a]quinoxalin -1- one. Sodium nitroprusside-induced relaxation was enhanced by EM extract, probably via PDE5 inhibition. EM extract reduced contractions evoked by extracellular Ca2+application, and inhibited intracellular Ca2+release activated by phenylephrine. The phenanthrene relaxed PA independently of the endothelium. MCT thickened walls and decreased lumens of PA, and hypertrophied right ventricular myocytes, effects ameliorated by 3 weeks of oral sildenafil (20  mg/kg) or EM extract (15, 450 or 1000  mg/kg). CONCLUSION: PAH is improved by EM extract acting through PA relaxation mediated through endothelial NO, reduced Ca2+-mobilization, and reduced PA wall thickness and right ventricular hypertrophy. PMID: 30466974 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Enhancing the Efficacy of Cognitive Bias Modification for Social Anxiety.

Related Articles Enhancing the Efficacy of Cognitive Bias Modification for Social Anxiety. Behav Ther. 2018 11;49(6):995-1007 Authors: Stevens ES, Behar E, Jendrusina AA Abstract Cognitive bias modification for interpretation (CBM-I) is a promising treatment modality for social anxiety disorder, but effect sizes are relatively small across investigations (Hallion & Ruscio, 2011). Additionally, the extent to which CBM-I impacts other cognitive, emotional, and behavioral outcomes is unclear. This study investigated whether two empirically supported treatment components for anxiety disorders, imaginal exposure (IE) and relaxation, augment the effects of CBM-I and increase the extent to which the effects of CBM-I generalize to behavioral and affective outcomes. We randomly assigned 111 undergraduate students with social anxiety to undergo IE, relaxation, or neutral thinking prior to CBM-I, then measured their interpretation biases, as well as their speaking time, anxiety, and subjective evaluations of performance during a speech task. Results indicated that individuals who received IE prior to CBM-I evidenced more adaptive interpretation biases and less behavioral avoidance during the speech task than did individuals who engaged in relaxation or neutral thinking. However, they did not report differential anxiety, habituation, or evaluations of their performance on the speech task. These findings suggest that the combination of CBM-I with adjunct components that target behavioral, rather than cognitive, mechanisms can facilitate transfer of the effects of CBM-I to reducing behavioral avoidance. PMID: 30316496 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

The ACE 2 activator diminazene aceturate (DIZE) improves left ventricular diastolic dysfunction following myocardial infarction in rats.

Related Articles The ACE 2 activator diminazene aceturate (DIZE) improves left ventricular diastolic dysfunction following myocardial infarction in rats. Biomed Pharmacother. 2018 Nov;107:212-218 Authors: Castardeli C, Sartório CL, Pimentel EB, Forechi L, Mill JG Abstract Diminazene aceturate (DIZE) has been reported to enhance the catalytic efficiency of ACE-2 and presumably increases angiotensin 1-7 generation, interfering with cardiac remodeling after myocardial infarction (MI). Our aim was to investigate the chronic effects of DIZE on cardiac dysfunction post-MI. Male Wistar rats underwent myocardial infarction (MI) or SHAM surgery (SO) and were divided into groups treated with DIZE 15 mg/kg/day, s.c. or vehicle (Control). After 4 weeks, the hemodynamic variables were recorded by cardiac catheterism. Hearts were then arrested to obtain the left ventricular (LV) pressure-volume curves in situ. Cardiomyocyte hypertrophy and collagen content were determined by histology. DIZE prevented LV end-diastolic pressure increases in MI rats (MI: 26 ± 3.3 vs. MI-DIZE: 15 ± 1.6 mmHg, P < 0.001) without a significant effect on LV systolic pressure (LVSP). Moreover, DIZE improved LV contractility (+dP/dt, MI: 3014 ± 161 vs. MI-DIZE: 3884 ± 104 mmHg/s, P < 0.001) and relaxation (-dP/dt, MI: -2333 ± 91 vs. MI-DIZE: -2798 ± 120 mmHg/s, P < 0.05). Right ventricular SP was increased in the MI compared to that in the SO group (40 ± 0.6 vs. 30 ± 1.2 mmHg; P < 0.01), and DIZE partially prevented this augmentation. LV stiffness was reduced in MI-DIZE compared with that in MI (0.64 ± 0.01 vs. 0.78 ± 0.02 mmHg/mL; P < 0.01). DIZE treatment reduced the interstitial collagen content by 18% in the surviving LV myocardium. Cardiomyocyte hypertrophy remained unaffected by DIZE treatment. Our findings show that chronic DIZE treatment post-MI attenuates the morphofunctional changes induced by MI in rats. The effects on LV -dP/dt, chamber stiffness and collagen content suggest this drug can be used as a therapeutic agent to reduce interstitial fibrosis and diastolic dysfunction after MI. PMID: 30092400 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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