CYBERMED LIFE - ORGANIC  & NATURAL LIVING

Cybermedlife - Therapeutic Actions Laughter-Humor

Laughter yoga activities for older people living in residential aged care homes: A feasibility study.

Abstract Title: Laughter yoga activities for older people living in residential aged care homes: A feasibility study. Abstract Source: Australas J Ageing. 2017 Jul 12. Epub 2017 Jul 12. PMID: 28699684 Abstract Author(s): Julie M Ellis, Ros Ben-Moshe, Karen Teshuva Article Affiliation: Julie M Ellis Abstract: OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effects of a laughter yoga activities (LY) program for older people living in residential aged care homes (RACHs). METHODS: A 6-week LY program was implemented at three RACHs with twenty-eight residents. A pre-post design was used to measure positive and negative affect, happiness, blood pressure and pulse. RESULTS: Post-session mean scores for positive mood, and happiness were significantly higher than pre-session scores in weeks 1, 3 and 6, and the post-session mean negative mood scores were significantly lower than pre-session scores in weeks 3 and 6. Post-session readings for mean systolic blood pressure were significantly lower than pre-session readings in weeks 1 and 6. CONCLUSION: This study demonstrates the potential for using LY to improve mood and lower blood pressure of older people living in RACHs. Article Published Date : Jul 11, 2017

Therapeutic Benefits of Laughter in Mental Health: A Theoretical Review. 📎

Abstract Title: Therapeutic Benefits of Laughter in Mental Health: A Theoretical Review. Abstract Source: Tohoku J Exp Med. 2016 ;239(3):243-9. PMID: 27439375 Abstract Author(s): JongEun Yim Article Affiliation: JongEun Yim Abstract: In modern society, fierce competition and socioeconomic interaction stress the quality of life, causing a negative influence on a person's mental health. Laughter is a positive sensation, and seems to be a useful and healthy way to overcome stress. Laughter therapy is a kind of cognitive-behavioral therapies that could make physical, psychological, and social relationships healthy, ultimately improving the quality of life. Laughter therapy, as a non-pharmacological, alternative treatment, has a positive effect on the mental health and the immune system. In addition, laughter therapy does not require specialized preparations, such as suitable facilities and equipment, and it is easily accessible and acceptable. For these reasons, the medical community has taken notice and attempted to include laughter therapy to more traditional therapies. Decreasing stress-making hormones found in the blood, laughter can mitigate the effects of stress. Laughter decreases serum levels of cortisol, epinephrine, growth hormone, and 3,4-dihydrophenylacetic acid (a major dopamine catabolite), indicating a reversal of the stress response. Depression is a disease, where neurotransmitters in the brain, such as norepinephrine, dopamine, and serotonin, are reduced, and there is something wrong in the mood control circuit of the brain. Laughter can alter dopamine and serotonin activity. Furthermore, endorphins secreted by laughter can help when people are uncomfortable or in a depressed mood. Laughter therapy is a noninvasive and non-pharmacological alternative treatment for stress and depression, representative cases that have a negative influence on mental health. In conclusion, laughter therapy is effective and scientifically supported as a single or adjuvant therapy. Article Published Date : Dec 31, 2015

The effects of humor therapy on nursing home residents measured using observational methods: the SMILE cluster randomized trial.

Abstract Title: The effects of humor therapy on nursing home residents measured using observational methods: the SMILE cluster randomized trial. Abstract Source: J Am Med Dir Assoc. 2014 Aug ;15(8):564-9. Epub 2014 May 9. PMID: 24814320 Abstract Author(s): Lee-Fay Low, Belinda Goodenough, Jennifer Fletcher, Kenny Xu, Anne-Nicole Casey, Lynn Chenoweth, Richard Fleming, Peter Spitzer, Jean-Paul Bell, Henry Brodaty Article Affiliation: Lee-Fay Low Abstract: OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the effects of humor therapy assessed using observational methods on agitation, engagement, positive behaviors, affect, and contentment. DESIGN: Single-blind cluster randomized controlled trial. SETTING: A total of 35 Sydney nursing homes. PARTICIPANTS: All eligible residents within geographically defined areas within each nursing home were invited to participate. INTERVENTION: Professional"ElderClowns"provided 9 to 12 weekly humor therapy sessions, augmented by resident engagement by trained staff"LaughterBosses."Controls received usual care. MEASUREMENTS: The Behavior Engagement Affect Measure (BEAM) touchpad observational tool was used to capture real-time behavioral data. The tool assesses the duration in seconds of agitation, positive behavior toward others, engagement, and affect (angry, anxious, happy, neutral, sad). RESULTS: Seventeen nursing homes (189 residents) received the intervention and 18 homes (209 residents) received usual care. Over 26 weeks, in comparison with controls, the humor therapy group decreased in duration of high agitation (effect size = 0.168 and 0.129 at 13 and 26 weeks, respectively) and increased in duration of happiness (effect size = 0.4 and 0.236 at 13 and 26 weeks, respectively). CONCLUSION: We confirmed that humor therapy decreases agitation and also showed that it increases happiness. Researchers may consider evaluating impacts of nonpharmaceutical interventions on positive outcomes. Computer-assisted observational measures should be considered, particularly for residents with dementia and when the reliability of staff is uncertain. Article Published Date : Jul 31, 2014

The effect of humor on short-term memory in older adults: a new component for whole-person wellness.

Abstract Title: The effect of humor on short-term memory in older adults: a new component for whole-person wellness. Abstract Source: Adv Mind Body Med. 2014 ;28(2):16-24. PMID: 24682001 Abstract Author(s): Gurinder Singh Bains, Lee S Berk, Noha Daher, Everett Lohman, Ernie Schwab, Jerrold Petrofsky, Pooja Deshpande Article Affiliation: Gurinder Singh Bains Abstract: CONTEXT: For older adults, the damaging effects of aging and stress can impair the ability to learn and sustain memory. Humor, with its associated mirthful laughter, can reduce stress and cortisol, a stress hormone. Chronic release of cortisol can damage hippocampus neurons, leading to impairment of learning and memory. OBJECTIVES: The primary goal of this study was to determine whether watching a humorous video had an effect on short-term memory in an older population. DESIGN: The research team designed a randomized, controlled trial. SETTING: The study took place at Loma Linda University in Loma Linda, California. PARTICIPANTS: The research team recruited 20 normal, healthy, older adults, 11 males and 9 females. INTERVENTION: The humor group (n = 10, mean = 69.3± 3.7 y) self-selected 1 of 2 humorous videos--a Red Skelton comedy or a montage of America's Funniest Home Videos--and watched it for 20 min. A control group (n = 10, mean = 68.7 ± 5.5 y) sat calmly for 20 min and were not allowed to read, sleep, or talk on a cell phone. OUTCOME MEASURES: The Rey Auditory Verbal Learning Test was used to assess short-term memory--learning ability, delayed recall, and visual recognition. Salivary cortisol levels were measured at predetermined times. RESULTS: Learning ability improved by 38.5% and 24.0% in the humor and control groups, respectively (P = .014). Delayed recall improved by 43.6% and 20.3% in the humor and control groups, respectively (P =.029). Within the humor group, delayed recall (43.6%) was significant compared with learning ability (38.5%) (P = .002). At 3 predetermined time points, significant decreases in salivary cortisol were observed in the humor group (P = .047, P = .046, and P = .062, respectively). CONCLUSION: The study's findings suggest that humor can have clinical benefits and rehabilitative implications and can be implemented in programs that support whole-person wellness for older adults. Learning ability and delayed recall are important to these individuals for a better quality of life--considering mind, body, spirit, social, and economic aspects. Older adults may have age-associated memory deficiencies. However, medical practitioners now can offer positive, enjoyable, and beneficial humor therapies to improve these deficiencies. Article Published Date : Dec 31, 2013

The effect of laughter therapy on radiation dermatitis in patients with breast cancer: a single-blind prospective pilot study. 📎

Abstract Title: The effect of laughter therapy on radiation dermatitis in patients with breast cancer: a single-blind prospective pilot study. Abstract Source: Onco Targets Ther. 2014 ;7:2053-9. Epub 2014 Nov 4. PMID: 25395864 Abstract Author(s): Moonkyoo Kong, Sung Hee Shin, Eunmi Lee, Eun Kyoung Yun Article Affiliation: Moonkyoo Kong Abstract: BACKGROUND: There have not yet been any published studies on the effects of laughter therapy on radiation-induced dermatitis in breast cancer patients treated with radiotherapy (RT). We assessed the effectiveness of laughter therapy in preventing radiation dermatitis in patients with breast cancer. METHODS: Thirty-seven patients were prospectively enrolled in this study. Eighteen patients were assigned to the experimental group and the other 19 patients were assigned to the control group. The patients who were assigned to the experimental group received laughter therapy during RT. Laughter therapy was started at the onset of RT and was provided twice a week until completion of RT. The patients who were assigned to the control group only received RT without laughter therapy. The grade of radiation dermatitis was scored by a radiation oncologist who was blinded to subject assignment. The patients' evaluation of pain within the RT field was also assessed. RESULTS: In the experimental group, radiation dermatitis of grade 3, 2, and 1 developed in five (33.3%), five (33.3%), and five patients (33.3%), respectively. In comparison, in the control group, radiation dermatitis of grade 3, 2, 1, and 0 developed in seven (36.8%), nine (47.4%), two (10.5%), and one patient (5.3%), respectively. The experimental group exhibited a lower incidence of grade 2 or worse radiation dermatitis than the control group (33.3% versus 47.4%). The mean maximal pain scores in the experimental and control group were 2.53 and 3.95, respectively. The experimental group complained of less severe pain than the control group during RT. However, these differences were not statistically significant. CONCLUSION: The results of this study show that laughter therapy can have a beneficial role in preventing radiation dermatitis in patients with breast cancer. To confirm the results of our study, well-designed randomized studies with large sample sizes are required. Article Published Date : Dec 31, 2013

Psychological, immunological and physiological effects of a Laughing Qigong Program (LQP) on adolescents. 📎

Abstract Title: Psychological, immunological and physiological effects of a Laughing Qigong Program (LQP) on adolescents. Abstract Source: Complement Ther Med. 2013 Dec ;21(6):660-8. Epub 2013 Sep 13. PMID: 24280475 Abstract Author(s): Chueh Chang, Grace Tsai, Chia-Jung Hsieh Article Affiliation: Chueh Chang Abstract: OBJECTIVES: One objective of this study was to assess the effects of laughter on the psychological, immunological and physiological systems of the body. Another objective was to introduce the Laughing Qigong Program (LQP), as a method of standardization for simulated laughter interventions. DESIGN: A randomized, prospective, experimental study of the LQP was conducted in a group of adolescents (n=67) in Taiwan. During study-hall sessions, experimental subjects (n=34) attended the LQP for eight-weeks. Simultaneously, control subjects (n=33) read or did their homework. All subjects were tested before and after the intervention on the following: Rosenberg Self-Esteem scale (RSE), Chinese Humor Scale (CHS) and Face Scale (FS) as psychological markers; saliva cortisol (CS) as an immunological marker; blood pressure (BP), heart rate (HR), and heart rate variability (HRV) as physiological markers of the body's response to stress. Mood states (FS) were measured before/after each LQP session. RESULTS: Mood states (p=.00) and humor (p=.004; p=.003) improved in the experimental group; no significant changes were found in the controls (p=69; p=60). The immunological marker of stress, cortisol levels, decreased significantly for those who participated in the LQP (p=.001), suggesting lower levels of stress after completion of the program. CONCLUSIONS: The LQP is a non-pharmacological and cost-effective means to help adolescents mitigate stresses in their everyday life. Article Published Date : Nov 30, 2013

Effects of a laughter and exercise program on physiological and psychological health among community-dwelling elderly in Japan: randomized controlled trial.

Abstract Title: Effects of a laughter and exercise program on physiological and psychological health among community-dwelling elderly in Japan: randomized controlled trial. Abstract Source: Geriatr Gerontol Int. 2013 Jan ;13(1):152-60. Epub 2012 Jun 7. PMID: 22672359 Abstract Author(s): Mayumi Hirosaki, Tetsuya Ohira, Mitsugu Kajiura, Masahiko Kiyama, Akihiko Kitamura, Shinichi Sato, Hiroyasu Iso Article Affiliation: Mayumi Hirosaki Abstract: AIM: To examine the effects of a once-weekly laughter and exercise program on physical and psychological health among elderly people living in the community. As a regular exercise program can be difficult to maintain, we provided a more enjoyable program to enhance adherence to exercise. METHODS: A total of 27 individuals aged 60 years or older, without disabilities, were randomly assigned to either an immediate treatment group (n=14) or a delayed treatment group (n=13). The intervention was a 120-min session consisting of laughter and exercise, carried out once a week for 10 consecutive weeks. Measurements taken at baseline, 3 and 6 months included bodyweight, height, body fat, lean mass, bone mineral density, hemoglobin A1c (HbA(1c)), glucose, high-density lipoprotein and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and triglycerides, as well as self-rated health and psychological factors. RESULTS: All participants completed the 3-month program. Bone mineral density increased significantly in the immediate treatment group compared with the delayed treatment group during the first 3 months (P<0.001). In addition, HbA(1c) decreased significantly (P=0.001), and self-rated health increased significantly (P=0.012). CONCLUSIONS: The combination of a laughter and exercise program might have physiological and psychological health benefits for the elderly. Laughter might be an effective strategy to motivate the elderly to participate in physical activity. Article Published Date : Dec 31, 2012

Effects of laughter therapy on postpartum fatigue and stress responses of postpartum women. 📎

Abstract Title: [Effects of laughter therapy on postpartum fatigue and stress responses of postpartum women]. Abstract Source: J Korean Acad Nurs. 2011 Jun ;41(3):294-301. PMID: 21804338 Abstract Author(s): Hye Sook Shin, Kyung Hee Ryu, Young A Song Article Affiliation: Hye Sook Shin Abstract: PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of laughter therapy on postpartum fatigue and stress responses of postpartum women. METHODS: The research design was a nonequivalent control group non-synchronized design. The participants were 67 postpartum women who agreed to participate in this study, selected by convenience sampling: (experiment group-33 and control group-34). The data were collected from August 5 to September 30, 2010. The experimental group received laughter therapy from a laughter therapy expert for 60 min, twice a week for 2 weeks, a total of 4 sessions. To evaluate the effects of laughter therapy, postpartum fatigue by self-report questionnaire and cortisol concentration in breast milk were measured. The data were analyzed using the SPSS WIN 13.0 Program. RESULTS: The first hypothesis that"the degree of postpartum fatigue in the experimental group participating in laughter therapy would be lower than that of the control group"was accepted. These findings indicate that laughter therapy has a positive effect on decreasing postpartum fatigue. CONCLUSION: The finding provides evidence for use of complementary and alternative nursing in Sanhujori facilities and obstetric units to reduce postpartum women's fatigue. Article Published Date : May 31, 2011

Effects of laughter therapy on depression, quality of life, resilience and immune responses in breast cancer survivors. 📎

Abstract Title: [Effects of laughter therapy on depression, quality of life, resilience and immune responses in breast cancer survivors]. Abstract Source: J Korean Acad Nurs. 2011 Jun ;41(3):285-93. PMID: 21804337 Abstract Author(s): Eun A Cho, Hyun Ei Oh Article Affiliation: Eun A Cho Abstract: PURPOSE: In this study, the effects of laughter therapy on levels of depression, quality of life, resilience and immune responses in breast cancer survivors were examined. METHODS: A quasi-experimental nonequivalent control group, pretest-posttest design was used. Participants (n=37) included breast cancer survivors who finished chemotheraphy and radiation therapy: 16 in the experiment group and 21 in the control group. Data were collected from August to November 2009. The experimental group participated in laughter therapy eight times, twice a week for 60 min per session. Questionnaires were used to measure pretest and posttest levels of depression, quality of life and resilience. A blood test was used to analyze changes in Total T cell, T helper, T suppressor, Th/Ts ratio, Total B cell, T cell/B cell ratio and NK cell for immune responses. RESULTS: The results showed that laughter therapy was effective in increasing the quality of life and resilience in breast cancer survivors. but depression and immune responses did not differ significantly between the groups. CONCLUSION: The results of the study indicate that laughter therapy may be an effective nursing intervention to improve quality of life and resilience in breast cancer survivors. Article Published Date : May 31, 2011

Laughter yoga versus group exercise program in elderly depressed women: a randomized controlled trial.

Abstract Title: Laughter yoga versus group exercise program in elderly depressed women: a randomized controlled trial. Abstract Source: Int J Geriatr Psychiatry. 2010 Sep 16. Epub 2010 Sep 16. PMID: 20848578 Abstract Author(s): Mahvash Shahidi, Ali Mojtahed, Amirhossein Modabbernia, Mohammad Mojtahed, Abdollah Shafiabady, Ali Delavar, Habib Honari Article Affiliation: Department of Counseling, School of Psychology&Training Sciences, Allameh Tabatabai University, Tehran, Iran. Abstract: BACKGROUND: Laughter Yoga founded by M. Kataria is a combination of unconditioned laughter and yogic breathing. Its effect on mental and physical aspects of healthy individuals was shown to be beneficial. OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to compare the effectiveness of Kataria's Laughter Yoga and group exercise therapy in decreasing depression and increasing life satisfaction in older adult women of a cultural community of Tehran, Iran. METHODS: Seventy depressed old women who were members of a cultural community of Tehran were chosen by Geriatric depression scale (score > 10). After completion of Life Satisfaction Scale pre-test and demographic questionnaire, subjects were randomized into three groups of laughter therapy, exercise therapy, and control. Subsequently, depression post-test and life satisfaction post-test were done for all three groups. The data wereanalyzed using analysis of covariance and Bonferroni's correction. RESULTS: Sixty subjects completed the study. The analysis revealed a significant difference in decrease in depression scores of both Laughter Yoga and exercise therapy group in comparison to control group (p < 0.001 and p < 0.01, respectively). There was no significant difference between Laughter Yoga and exercise therapy groups. The increase in life satisfaction of Laughter Yoga group showed a significant difference in comparison with control group (p < 0.001). No significant difference was found between exercise therapy and either control or Laughter Yoga group. CONCLUSION: Our findings showed that Laughter Yoga is at least as effective as group exercise program in improvement of depression and life satisfaction of elderly depressed women. Copyright © 2010 John Wiley&Sons, Ltd. Article Published Date : Sep 16, 2010

A case of laughter therapy that helped improve advanced gastric cancer.

Abstract Title: A case of laughter therapy that helped improve advanced gastric cancer. Abstract Source: Jpn Hosp. 2010 Jul(29):59-64. PMID: 21706962 Abstract Author(s): Satoru Noji, Kazue Takayanagi Article Affiliation: Noji Clinic. This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. Abstract: We have reported the case of a patient diagnosed as having advanced gastric cancer at the age of 88 years old. An endoscopy revealed a type-2 gastric cancer of 25 x 30 mm in the lesser curvature of the middle stomach body and an IIa gastric cancer with T2 SS and cardiac accessory lesions. Both the type-2 and IIa lesions were defined as tub1 with surrounding atrophic gastritis and entero-epithelium metaplastic carcinoma. Considering the patient's age and her desire not to receive cancer treatment, we prescribed laughter therapy as recommended by the Society for Healing Environment. The program was implemented in a laughter-inducing environment and consisted of five stages: (1) Making the patient feel safe, (2) Relaxing the patient, (3) Increasing the effectiveness, (4) Improving her condition and (5) Increasing her joy of living. One year and seven months later, an endoscopy of the lesser curvature of the middle stomach body indicated that the lesions clearly improved with a morphological reduction into IIa + IIc masses. A tissue biopsy revealed that nucleus abnormality clearly improved from the initial diagnosis, with no irregularity in size. The suspected lesion was localized to a limited area near the stomach wall. Although partial gastric adenocarcinoma was suspected, the cancers turned into gastric adenoma, atrophic gastritis, and enteroepithelium metaplastic carcinoma. Now, five years after the initial diagnosis, she maintains a good condition. Laughter, one of our casual behaviors, has the effect of reducing the stress experienced by the human body. Laughter is expected to become alternative medicine in the future, and we hope to see more reports and evidence on soothing therapies using laughter. Article Published Date : Jul 01, 2010

Reconstructing the evolution of laughter in great apes and humans. 📎

Abstract Title: Reconstructing the evolution of laughter in great apes and humans. Abstract Source: Curr Biol. 2009 Jul 14;19(13):1106-11. Epub 2009 Jun 4. PMID: 19500987 Abstract Author(s): Marina Davila Ross, Michael J Owren, Elke Zimmermann Article Affiliation: Centre for the Study of Emotion, Psychology Department, University of Portsmouth, Portsmouth PO1 2DY, UK; Institute of Zoology, University of Veterinary Medicine Hannover, Hannover 30559, Germany. This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. Abstract: Human emotional expressions, such as laughter, are argued to have their origins in ancestral nonhuman primate displays. To test this hypothesis, the current work examined the acoustics of tickle-induced vocalizations from infant and juvenile orangutans, gorillas, chimpanzees, and bonobos, as well as tickle-induced laughter produced by human infants. Resulting acoustic data were then coded as character states and submitted to quantitative phylogenetic analysis. Acoustic outcomes revealed both important similarities and differences among the five species. Furthermore, phylogenetic trees reconstructed from the acoustic data matched the well-established trees based on comparative genetics. Taken together, the results provide strong evidence that tickling-induced laughter is homologous in great apes and humans and support the more general postulation of phylogenetic continuity from nonhuman displays to human emotional expressions. Findings also show that distinctively human laughter characteristics such as predominantly regular, stable voicing and consistently egressive airflow are nonetheless traceable to characteristics of shared ancestors with great apes. Article Published Date : Jul 14, 2009

The effect of mirthful laughter on the human cardiovascular system. 📎

Abstract Title: The effect of mirthful laughter on the human cardiovascular system. Abstract Source: Med Hypotheses. 2009 May 26. PMID: 19477604 Abstract Author(s): Michael Miller, William F Fry Abstract: It has become increasingly recognized and more widely acknowledged during the past several decades, that a complex relationship exists between behavior associated with emotion and the human cardiovascular (CV) system. Early studies focused on the interplay between negative emotions and elevated CV risk, an effect that has in large part been attributed to increased adrenergic activity. Thus, a variety of adverse CV effects ranging from sudden cardiac death triggered by natural disasters such as earthquakes to transient myocardial stunning resulting from heightened sympathetic overload have been identified in response to acute emotional distress. In fact, the biologic interplay between emotion and CV health has been greatly enhanced through studies of the vascular endothelium. As the largest organ in humans, the inner blood vessel lining serves as a conduit for the transfer of blood cells, lipids and various nutrients across the lumen to neighboring tissues. Healthy endothelial cells secrete vasoactive chemicals, most notably endothelial-derived relaxing factor or nitric oxide (NO), that effects smooth muscle relaxation and vessel dilation via a cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) dependent protein kinase signaling pathway. In addition, endothelial derived NO may reduce vascular inflammation by attenuating or inhibiting leukocyte adhesion and subendothelial transmigration as well as decreasing platelet activation via cGMP mediated pathways. Taken together, studying the endothelium provides an exceptional opportunity to advance our understanding of the potentially important interrelationship between emotions and the vasculature. Premised on the identification of physiological and biochemical correlates, the former was demonstrated after intracoronary administration of acetylcholine yielded paradoxical endothelial vasoconstriction in response to mental stress exercises. More recently, the brachial artery reactivity test (BART) has permitted endothelial function to be assessed in a non-invasive manner. In addition to traditional CV risk factors, exposure to negative emotions including mental stress and depression have been associated with reduced endothelial vasoreactivity as measured by BART. Whether mirthful laughter has the opposite effect garnered consideration following the discovery that mu3 opiate receptors were expressed in the vascular endothelium. Because mirthful laughter induces the release of beta-endorphins which in turn have high affinity for mu3 opiate receptors, we hypothesize that such positive emotions lead to the direct release of NO and associated biological consequences. Indeed, our studies have demonstrated opposing effects on endothelial vasoreactivity between those previously established (e.g., mental stress induced by negative visual and/or auditory stimuli) and those induced after mirthful laughter, thereby providing a potential mechanistic link between positive emotions and beneficial effects on the vasculature. This article reviews the relevant physiology and comments on the potentially wider clinical implications in the integration of this process to improve vascular health. Article Published Date : May 26, 2009

Viewing a humorous film decreases IgE production by seminal B cells from patients with atopic eczema.

Abstract Title: Viewing a humorous film decreases IgE production by seminal B cells from patients with atopic eczema. Abstract Source: J Psychosom Res. 2009 Feb;66(2):173-5. Epub 2008 Nov 22. PMID: 19154860 Abstract Author(s): Hajime Kimata Abstract: OBJECTIVE: Sperms induced IgE production by seminal B cells from patients with atopic eczema via interaction of B cells with galectin-3 on sperms. We studied the effect of viewing a humorous film on IgE production by seminal B cells cultured with sperms. METHODS: Twenty-four male patients with atopic eczema viewed a humorous film (Modern Times, featuring Charlie Chaplin). Just before and immediately after viewing, semen was collected, and seminal B cells and sperms were purified. Seminal B cells were cultured with sperms and IgE production was measured, while expression of galectin-3 on sperms was assessed. RESULTS: After viewing the humorous film, IgE production by B cells cultured with sperms was significantly decreased. Moreover, expression of galectin-3 on sperms was reduced. CONCLUSION: Viewing a humorous film reduced galectin-3 expression on sperms, which in turn decreased IgE production by seminal B cells cultured with sperms. These results indicate that viewing a humorous film may be helpful for the study and treatment of local IgE production and allergy in the reproductive tract. Article Published Date : Feb 01, 2009

Evaluation of the effect of hospital clown's performance about anxiety in children subjected to surgical intervention

Abstract Title: [Evaluation of the effect of hospital clown's performance about anxiety in children subjected to surgical intervention]. Abstract Source: Cir Pediatr. 2008 Oct;21(4):195-8. PMID: 18998367 Abstract Author(s): M A Gutiérrez Cantó, J M Ortigosa Quiles, O Girón Vallejo, R Ruiz Pruneda, J Sánchez Morote, M J Guirao Piñera, G Zambudio Carmona, M J Astillero Fuentes, I Castaño Collado, Cárceles Barón Abstract: OBJECTIVE: To be hospitalized is a highly distressing event for children. At present, a resort used in Spain and other countries to reduce children's anxiety in the health context are hospital's clown. We studied the effect of the hospital's clowns about the anxiety in children that going to be operated. METHODS: We recruited 60 children aged 6 to 10 years scheduled to undergo elective surgery. 30 children would have clowns before the surgery (case group) and 30 would not have them (control group). In the case group, two clowns performed for children. We measured the anxiety with several scales (STAIC, CCPH, faces scale), after the performance and until 7 days after the surgery. RESULTS: The outcomes show both groups a tendency to increase anxiety but the children of the case group showed less increase at the anxiety's score. In the control group is showed that the children are more alterated at seven days from the discharge. CONCLUSIONS: Children that receive the clown's care, have tendency to be less distressing and with less fear that another ones, measurement by STAIC and faces scale, and these results are maintained seven days after the discharge. Article Published Date : Oct 01, 2008
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Therapeutic Actions Laughter-Humor

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Positive emotional contagion in a New Zealand parrot.

Related Articles Positive emotional contagion in a New Zealand parrot. Curr Biol. 2017 Mar 20;27(6):R213-R214 Authors: Schwing R, Nelson XJ, Wein A, Parsons S Abstract Positive emotional contagions are outwardly emotive actions that spread from one individual to another, such as glee in preschool children [1] or laughter in humans of all ages [2]. The play vocalizations of some animals may also act as emotional contagions. For example, artificially deafened rats are less likely to play than their non-hearing-impaired conspecifics, while no such effect is found for blinded rats [3]. As rat play vocalizations are also produced in anticipation of play, they, rather than the play itself, may act as a contagion, leading to a hypothesis of evolutionary parallels between rat play vocalizations and human laughter [4]. The kea parrot (Nestor notabilis) has complex play behaviour and a distinct play vocalization [5]. We used acoustic playback to investigate the effect of play calls on wild kea, finding that play vocalizations increase the amount of play among both juveniles and adults, likely by acting as a positive emotional contagion. PMID: 28324733 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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