Cybermedlife - Therapeutic Actions Cryotherapy

The effects of whole-body cryotherapy and melatonin supplementation on total antioxidative status and some antioxidative enzymes in multiple sclerosis patients

Abstract Title: [The effects of whole-body cryotherapy and melatonin supplementation on total antioxidative status and some antioxidative enzymes in multiple sclerosis patients]. Abstract Source: Pol Merkur Lekarski. 2011 Sep ;31(183):150-3. PMID: 21991843 Abstract Author(s): Elzbieta Miller, Małgorzata Mrowicka, Katarzyna Malinowska, Józef Kedziora, Ireneusz Majsterek Article Affiliation: Neurorehabilitation Ward, III Municipal Hospital in Łódź, Poland. This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. Abstract: Oxidative stress is an important factor which contribute to the pathogenesis of lesions in multiple sclerosis (MS). Whole body cryotherapy (WBCT) is often used in treatment neurological and orthopedic diseases. THE AIM, MATERIAL AND METHODS: The aim of this study was to determinate the level of total antioxidative status (TAS) in plasma and activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT) in erythrocytes of MS patients (n = 28) before and after 10 exposures of WBCT (-120 degrees C/3 minutes/day). 16 MS patients during 10 exposures of WBCT additionally were supplemented by 10 mg of melatonin. RESULTS: Increasing of TAS level in plasma as well as supplemented with melatonin and non-supplemented MS patients was observed after 10 exposures of WBCT Melatonin statistically significant increased activity of SOD and CAT in erythrocytes of MS patients treated with WBCT. CONCLUSIONS: Results of our study indicate significant increase of TAS level in plasma of MS patients of WBCT treatment. This indicate that WBCT might be a therapy which suppress oxidative stress in MS patients. Article Published Date : Sep 01, 2011
Therapeutic Actions Cryotherapy

NCBI pubmed

Short-term effects of cannabidiol after global hypoxia-ischemia in newborn piglets.

Related Articles Short-term effects of cannabidiol after global hypoxia-ischemia in newborn piglets. Pediatr Res. 2016 Nov;80(5):710-718 Authors: Garberg HT, Huun MU, Escobar J, Martinez-Orgado J, Løberg EM, Solberg R, Didrik Saugstad O Abstract BACKGROUND: Cannabidiol (CBD), a nonpsychoactive cannabinoid, has shown neuroprotective actions after neonatal hypoxia-ischemia (HI) in animals. We wanted to further explore the effects of CBD, alone and in conjunction with hypothermia, in a piglet model of global HI. METHODS: Fifty-five anesthetized newborn piglets were randomized to either controls (n = 7) or HI (n = 48) by ventilation with 8% O2 until mean arterial blood pressure reached 20 mmHg and/or base excess reached -20 mmol/l. After resuscitation piglets were randomized to either: vehicle (VEH), CBD 1mg/kg, VEH+hypothermia (H) or CBD 1mg/kg+H (each n = 12). Piglets were euthanized 9.5 h after HI and plasma, urine, cerebrospinal fluid, and brain tissue were sampled for analysis. RESULTS: HI induced global damage with significantly increased neuropathology score, S100B in cerebrospinal fluid, hippocampal proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy biomarkers, plasma troponin-T, and urinary neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin. CBD alone did not have any significant effects on these parameters while CBD+H reduced urinary neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin compared with VEH+H (P < 0.05). Both hypothermic groups had significantly lower glutamate/N-acetylaspartate ratios (P < 0.01) and plasma troponin-T (P<0.05) levels compared with normothermic groups. CONCLUSION: In contrast to previous studies, we do not find significant protective effects of CBD after HI in piglets. Evaluation of CBD in higher doses might be warranted. PMID: 27441365 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]