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The Effects of Qigong on Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis. 📎

Abstract Title: The Effects of Qigong on Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis. Abstract Source: Evid Based Complement Alternat Med. 2018 ;2018:8182938. Epub 2018 Jan 3. PMID: 29507593 Abstract Author(s): Ding Meng, Wang Chunyan, Dong Xiaosheng, Yi Xiangren Article Affiliation: Ding Meng Abstract: Objective: The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of Qigong on type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) using the systematic review and meta-analysis. Methods: All prospective, randomized, controlled clinical trials published in English or Chinese and involving the use of Qigong by patients with DM were searched in 7 electronic databases from their respective inception to June 2016. The meta-analysis was conducted using the Revman 5.2. The quality of the included trials was assessed using the Jadad rating scale. Two researchers independently completed the inclusion, data extraction, and quality assessment. Results: Twenty-one trials with 1326 patients met the inclusion criteria and were reviewed. The meta-analysis demonstrated that, compared with no exercise, the Qigong had significant effects on fasting blood glucose (MD = -0.99, 95% CI (-1.23, 0.75),<0.0001), HbA1c (MD = -0.84, 95% CI (-1.02, -0.65),<0.0001), and postprandial blood glucose (MD = -1.55, 95% CI (-2.19, -0.91),<0.00001). Conclusion: The Qigong training can improve the blood glucose status of the type 2 DM patients and has positive effects on the management of type 2 DM. However, future research with better quality still needs to be conducted to address the effects of Qigong on type 2 DM. Article Published Date : Dec 31, 2017

Tai Chi and Qigong for cancer-related symptoms and quality of life: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

Abstract Title: Tai Chi and Qigong for cancer-related symptoms and quality of life: a systematic review and meta-analysis. Abstract Source: J Cancer Surviv. 2017 Dec 8. Epub 2017 Dec 8. PMID: 29222705 Abstract Author(s): Peter M Wayne, M S Lee, J Novakowski, K Osypiuk, J Ligibel, L E Carlson, R Song Article Affiliation: Peter M Wayne Abstract: PURPOSE: This study aims to summarize and critically evaluate the effects of Tai Chi and Qigong (TCQ) mind-body exercises on symptoms and quality of life (QOL) in cancer survivors. METHODS: A systematic search in four electronic databases targeted randomized and non-randomized clinical studies evaluating TCQ for fatigue, sleep difficulty, depression, pain, and QOL in cancer patients, published through August 2016. Meta-analysis was used to estimate effect sizes (ES, Hedges' g) and publication bias for randomized controlled trials (RCTs). Methodological bias in RCTs was assessed. RESULTS: Our search identified 22 studies, including 15 RCTs that evaluated 1283 participants in total, 75% women. RCTs evaluated breast (n = 7), prostate (n = 2), lymphoma (n = 1), lung (n = 1), or combined (n = 4) cancers. RCT comparison groups included active intervention (n = 7), usual care (n = 5), or both (n = 3). Duration of TCQ training ranged from 3 to 12 weeks. Methodological bias was low in 12 studies and high in 3 studies. TCQ was associated with significant improvement in fatigue (ES = - 0.53, p < 0.001), sleep difficulty (ES = - 0.49, p = 0.018), depression (ES = - 0.27, p = 0.001), and overall QOL (ES = 0.33, p = 0.004); a statistically non-significant trend was observed for pain (ES = - 0.38, p = 0.136). Random effects models were used for meta-analysis based on Q test and Icriteria. Funnel plots suggest some degree of publication bias. Findings in non-randomized studies largely paralleled meta-analysis results. CONCLUSIONS: Larger and methodologically sound trials with longer follow-up periods and appropriate comparison groups are needed before definitive conclusions can be drawn, and cancer- and symptom-specific recommendations can be made. IMPLICATIONS FOR CANCER SURVIVORS: TCQ shows promise in addressing cancer-related symptoms and QOL in cancer survivors. Article Published Date : Dec 07, 2017

Qigong Exercise and Arthritis. 📎

Abstract Title: Qigong Exercise and Arthritis. Abstract Source: Medicines (Basel). 2017 Sep 27 ;4(4). Epub 2017 Sep 27. PMID: 28953263 Abstract Author(s): Ray Marks Article Affiliation: Ray Marks Abstract: Background: Arthritis is a chronic condition resulting in considerable disability, particularly in later life. Aims: The first aim of this review was to summarize and synthesize the research base concerning the use of Qigong exercises as a possible adjunctive strategy for promoting well-being among adults with arthritis. A second was to provide related intervention directives for health professionals working or who are likely to work with this population in the future. Methods: Material specifically focusing on examining the nature of Qigong for minimizing arthritis disability, pain and dependence and for improving life quality was sought. Results: Collectively, despite almost no attention to this topic, available data reveal that while more research is indicated, Qigong exercises-practiced widely in China for many centuries as an exercise form, mind-body and relaxation technique-may be very useful as an intervention strategy for adults with different forms of painful disabling arthritis. Conclusion: Health professionals working with people who have chronic arthritis can safely recommend these exercises to most adults with this condition with the expectation they will heighten the life quality of the individual, while reducing pain and depression in adults with this condition. Article Published Date : Sep 26, 2017

Qigong Exercises for the Management of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus. 📎

Abstract Title: Qigong Exercises for the Management of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus. Abstract Source: Medicines (Basel). 2017 Aug 9 ;4(3). Epub 2017 Aug 9. PMID: 28930273 Abstract Author(s): Amy L Putiri, Jacqueline R Close, Harold Ryan Lilly, Nathalie Guillaume, Guan-Cheng Sun Article Affiliation: Amy L Putiri Abstract: Background: The purpose of this article is to clarify and define medical qigong and to identify an appropriate study design and methodology for a large-scale study looking at the effects of qigong in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), specifically subject enrollment criteria, selection of the control group and study duration. Methods: A comprehensive literature review of English databases was used to locate articles from 1980-May 2017 involving qigong and T2DM. Control groups, subject criteria and the results of major diabetic markers were reviewed and compared within each study. Definitions of qigong and its differentiation from physical exercise were also considered. Results: After a thorough review, it was found that qigong shows positive effects on T2DM; however, there were inconsistencies in control groups, research subjects and diabetic markers analyzed. It was also discovered that there is a large variation in styles and definitions of qigong. Conclusions: Qigong exercise has shown promising results in clinical experience and in randomized, controlled pilot studies for affecting aspects of T2DM including blood glucose, triglycerides, total cholesterol, weight, BMI and insulin resistance. Due to the inconsistencies in study design and methods and the lack of large-scale studies, further well-designed randomized control trials (RCT) are needed to evaluate the 'vital energy' or qi aspect of internal medical qigong in people who have been diagnosed with T2DM. Article Published Date : Aug 08, 2017

Qigong and Fibromyalgia circa 2017. 📎

Abstract Title: Qigong and Fibromyalgia circa 2017. Abstract Source: Medicines (Basel). 2017 Jun 6 ;4(2). Epub 2017 Jun 6. PMID: 28930252 Abstract Author(s): Jana Sawynok, Mary E Lynch Article Affiliation: Jana Sawynok Abstract: Qigong is an internal art practice with a long history in China. It is currently characterized as meditative movement (or as movement-based embodied contemplative practice), but is also considered as complementary and alternative exercise or mind-body therapy. There are now six controlled trials and nine other reports on the effects of qigong in fibromyalgia. Outcomes are related to amount of practice so it is important to consider this factor in overview analyses. If one considers the 4 trials (201 subjects) that involve diligent practice (30-45 min daily, 6-8 weeks), there are consistent benefits in pain, sleep, impact, and physical and mental function following the regimen, with benefits maintained at 4-6 months. Effect sizes are consistently in the large range. There are also reports of even more extensive practice of qigong for 1-3 years, even up to a decade, indicating marked benefits in other health areas beyond core domains for fibromyalgia. While the latter reports involve a limited number of subjects and represent a self-selected population, the marked health benefits that occur are noteworthy. Qigong merits further study as a complementary practice for those with fibromyalgia. Current treatment guidelines do not consider amount of practice, and usually make indeterminate recommendations. Article Published Date : Jun 05, 2017

The impact of Tai Chi and Qigong mind-body exercises on motor and non-motor function and quality of life in Parkinson's disease: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

Abstract Title: The impact of Tai Chi and Qigong mind-body exercises on motor and non-motor function and quality of life in Parkinson's disease: A systematic review and meta-analysis. Abstract Source: Parkinsonism Relat Disord. 2017 May 25. Epub 2017 May 25. PMID: 28602515 Abstract Author(s): R Song, W Grabowska, M Park, K Osypiuk, G P Vergara-Diaz, P Bonato, J M Hausdorff, M Fox, L R Sudarsky, E Macklin, P M Wayne Article Affiliation: R Song Abstract: PURPOSE: To systematically evaluate and quantify the effects of Tai Chi/Qigong (TCQ) on motor (UPDRS III, balance, falls, Timed-Up-and-Go, and 6-Minute Walk) and non-motor (depression and cognition) function, and quality of life (QOL) in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). METHODS: A systematic search in 7 electronic databases targeted clinical studies evaluating TCQ for individuals with PD published through August 2016. Meta-analysis was used to estimate effect sizes (Hedges's g) and publication bias for randomized controlled trials (RCTs). Methodological bias in RCTs was assessed by two raters. RESULTS: Our search identified 21 studies, 15 of which were RCTs with a total of 735 subjects. For RCTs, comparison groups included no treatment (n = 7, 47%) and active interventions (n = 8, 53%). Duration of TCQ ranged from 2 to 6 months. Methodological bias was low in 6 studies, moderate in 7, and high in 2. Fixed-effect models showed that TCQ was associated with significant improvement on most motor outcomes (UPDRS III [ES = -0.444, p < 0.001], balance [ES = 0.544, p < 0.001], Timed-Up-and-Go [ES = -0.341, p = 0.005], 6 MW [ES = -0.293, p = 0.06], falls [ES = -0.403, p = 0.004], as well as depression [ES = -0.457, p = 0.008] and QOL [ES = -0.393, p < 0.001], but not cognition [ES = -0.225, p = 0.477]). I(2) indicated limited heterogeneity. Funnel plots suggested some degree of publication bias. CONCLUSION: Evidence to date supports a potential benefit of TCQ for improving motor function, depression and QOL for individuals with PD, and validates the need for additional large-scale trials. Article Published Date : May 24, 2017

Qigong Exercise May Reduce Serum TNF-α Levels and Improve Sleep in People with Parkinson's Disease: A Pilot Study. 📎

Abstract Title: Qigong Exercise May Reduce Serum TNF-α Levels and Improve Sleep in People with Parkinson's Disease: A Pilot Study. Abstract Source: Medicines (Basel). 2017 Apr 23 ;4(2). Epub 2017 Apr 23. PMID: 28930237 Abstract Author(s): Sanghee Moon, Marshall Schmidt, Irina V Smirnova, Yvonne Colgrove, Wen Liu Article Affiliation: Sanghee Moon Abstract: Background: Inflammatory cytokine levels are often elevated in people with Parkinson's disease (PD). People with PD often experience sleep disturbances that significantly impact quality of life. Past studies suggest inflammatory cytokines may be associated with various symptoms of PD. Benefits of Qigong, a mind-body exercise, have been shown in different neurological conditions, but there is still a lack of clinical evidence in the PD population. Methods: Ten people with PD were recruited and randomly assigned into two groups receiving six weeks of Qigong (experimental group) or sham Qigong (control group) intervention. The levels of TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6 in subjects' serum and sleep quality were measured before and after the intervention. Results: After the intervention, the serum level of TNF-α in the experimental group was significantly decreased in all subjects, while the level in the control group showed a trend to increase. Qigong exercise significantly improved sleep quality at night. There was a strong correlation between changes in the level of TNF-α and sleep quality. Conclusion: Qigong exercise decreased TNF-α level in people with PD and helped improve sleep quality. TNF-α may have a potential to influence the sleep quality in people with PD. Article Published Date : Apr 22, 2017

Qigong in Cancer Care: Theory, Evidence-Base, and Practice. 📎

Abstract Title: Qigong in Cancer Care: Theory, Evidence-Base, and Practice. Abstract Source: Medicines (Basel). 2017 Jan 12 ;4(1). Epub 2017 Jan 12. PMID: 28930219 Abstract Author(s): Penelope Klein Article Affiliation: Penelope Klein Abstract: Background: The purpose of this discussion is to explore the theory, evidence base, and practice of Qigong for individuals with cancer. Questions addressed are: What is qigong? How does it work? What evidence exists supporting its practice in integrative oncology? What barriers to wide-spread programming access exist? Methods: Sources for this discussion include a review of scholarly texts, the Internet, PubMed, field observations, and expert opinion. Results: Qigong is a gentle, mind/body exercise integral within Chinese medicine. Theoretical foundations include Chinese medicine energy theory, psychoneuroimmunology, the relaxation response, the meditation effect, and epigenetics. Research supports positive effects on quality of life (QOL), fatigue, immune function and cortisol levels, and cognition for individuals with cancer. There is indirect, scientific evidence suggesting that qigong practice may positively influence cancer prevention and survival. No one Qigong exercise regimen has been established as superior. Effective protocols do have common elements: slow mindful exercise, easy to learn, breath regulation, meditation, emphasis on relaxation, and energy cultivation including mental intent and self-massage. Conclusions: Regular practice of Qigong exercise therapy has the potential to improve cancer-related QOL and is indirectly linked to cancer prevention and survival. Wide-spread access to quality Qigong in cancer care programming may be challenged by the availability of existing programming and work force capacity. Article Published Date : Jan 11, 2017

Reiki Is Better Than Placebo and Has Broad Potential as a Complementary Health Therapy. 📎

Abstract Title: Reiki Is Better Than Placebo and Has Broad Potential as a Complementary Health Therapy. Abstract Source: J Evid Based Complementary Altern Med. 2017 Jan 1:2156587217728644. Epub 2017 Jan 1. PMID: 28874060 Abstract Author(s): David E McManus Article Affiliation: David E McManus Abstract: This study reviews the available clinical studies of Reiki to determine whether there is evidence for Reiki providing more than just a placebo effect. The available English-language literature of Reiki was reviewed, specifically for peer-reviewed clinical studies with more than 20 participants in the Reiki treatment arm, controlling for a placebo effect. Of the 13 suitable studies, 8 demonstrated Reiki being more effective than placebo, 4 found no difference but had questionable statistical resolving power, and only one provided clear evidence for not providing benefit. Viewed collectively, these studies provide reasonably strong support for Reiki being more effective than placebo. From the information currently available, Reiki is a safe and gentle"complementary"therapy that activates the parasympathetic nervous system to heal body and mind. It has potential for broader use in management of chronic health conditions, and possibly in postoperative recovery. Research is needed to optimize the delivery of Reiki. Article Published Date : Dec 31, 2016

Massage and Reiki used to reduce stress and anxiety: Randomized Clinical Trial. 📎

Abstract Title: Massage and Reiki used to reduce stress and anxiety: Randomized Clinical Trial. Abstract Source: Rev Lat Am Enfermagem. 2016 Nov 28 ;24:e2834. Epub 2016 Nov 28. PMID: 27901219 Abstract Author(s): Leonice Fumiko Sato Kurebayashi, Ruth Natalia Teresa Turrini, Talita Pavarini Borges de Souza, Raymond Sehiji Takiguchi, Gisele Kuba, Marisa Toshi Nagumo Article Affiliation: Leonice Fumiko Sato Kurebayashi Abstract: Objective:: to evaluate the effectiveness of massage and reiki in the reduction of stress and anxiety in clients at the Institute for Integrated and Oriental Therapy in Sao Paulo (Brazil). Method:: clinical tests randomly done in parallel with an initial sample of 122 people divided into three groups: Massage + Rest (G1), Massage + Reiki (G2) and a Control group without intervention (G3). The Stress Systems list and the Trace State Anxiety Inventory were used to evaluate the groups at the start and after 8 sessions (1 month), during 2015. Results:: there were statistical differences (p = 0.000) according to the ANOVA (Analysis of Variance) for the stress amongst the groups 2 and 3 (p = 0.014) with a 33% reductions and a Cohen of 0.78. In relation to anxiety-state, there was a reduction in the intervention groups compared with the control group (p<0.01) with a 21% reduction in group 2 (Cohen of 1.18) and a 16% reduction for group 1 (Cohen of 1.14). Conclusion:: Massage + Reiki produced better results amongst the groups and the conclusion is for further studies to be done with the use of a placebo group to evaluate the impact of the technique separate from other techniques. RBR-42c8wp. Objetivo:: avaliar a efetividade da Massagem e Reiki na redução de estresse e ansiedade em clientes do Instituto de Terapia Integrada e Oriental, em São Paulo (Brasil). Método:: ensaio clínico controlado randomizado paralelo com amostra inicial de 122 pessoas divididas em 3 grupos Massagem+Repouso (G1), Massagem+Reiki (G2) e Controle sem intervenção (G3). Foram avaliados pela Lista de Sintomas de Stress e pelo Inventário de Ansiedade Traço-Estado, no início e após 8 sessões(1 mês), durante o ano de 2015. Resultados:: houve diferença estatística (p = 0,000) segundo ANOVA para o estresse entre os grupos 2 e 3 (33% de redução e Cohen de 0,98) e entre os grupos 1 e 3 (p = 0,014), 24% de redução e Cohen de 0,78. Para a ansiedade-estado, houve redução nos grupos de intervenção comparados ao grupo Controle (p<0,01), com 21% de redução para o Grupo 2 (Cohen de 1,18) e 16% de redução para o grupo 1 (Cohen de 1,14). Conclusão:: a Massagem+Reiki conseguiu melhores resultados entre os grupos e se sugere outro estudo com uso de placebo para o Reiki, para avaliar o alcance da técnica em separado. RBR-42c8wp. Objetivo:: evaluar la efectividad de Masaje y Reiki para reducción del estrés y ansiedad en clientes del Instituto de Terapia Integrada y Oriental, en Sao Paulo, Brasil. Método:: ensayo clínico controlado aleatorizado paralelo, con muestra inicial de 122 personas divididas en 3 grupos Masaje+Reposo (G1), Masaje+Reiki (G2) y Control sin intervención (G3). Los participantes fueron evaluados a través de la Lista de Síntomas de Stress y por el Inventario de Ansiedad Rasgo-Estado, enel inicio y después de 8 sesiones (1 mes), durante el año de 2015. Resultados:: hubo diferencia estadística (p = 0,000) según ANOVA para el estrés entre los grupos 2 y 3 (33% de reducción y Cohen de 0,98) y entre los grupos 1 y 3 (p = 0,014), 24% de reducción y Cohen de 0,78. Para la ansiedad-estado, hubo reducción en los grupos de intervención comparados al grupo Control (p<0,01), con 21% de reducción para el Grupo 2 (Cohen de 1,18) y 16% de reducción para el grupo 1 (Cohen de 1,14). Conclusión:: entre los grupos, el Masaje+Reiki consiguió mejores resultados; se sugiere realizar otro estudio con uso de placebo para el Reiki, para evaluar el alcance de la técnica de forma separada. RBR-42c8wp. Article Published Date : Nov 27, 2016

Qigong/tai chi for sleep and fatigue in prostate cancer patients undergoing radiotherapy: A randomized controlled trial.

Abstract Title: Qigong/tai chi for sleep and fatigue in prostate cancer patients undergoing radiotherapy: A randomized controlled trial. Abstract Source: Psychooncology. 2016 Aug 22. Epub 2016 Aug 22. PMID: 27548839 Abstract Author(s): Jennifer McQuade, Sarah Prinsloo, David Z Chang, Amy Spelman, Qi Wei, Karen Basen-Engquist, Carol Harrison, Zonghao Zhang, Debra Kuban, Andrew Lee, Lorenzo Cohen Article Affiliation: Jennifer McQuade Abstract: OBJECTIVES: Sleep disturbances and fatigue are common in prostate cancer patients undergoing radiotherapy. Prior research suggests mind-body techniques may improve these outcomes. We conducted a randomized-controlled trial of qigong/tai chi (QGTC) in men with prostate cancer undergoing radiotherapy. METHODS: Men with prostate cancer starting definitive radiation were randomized to one of three groups: (1) QGTC; (2) light exercise (LE); or (3) wait list control (WLC). Sleep disturbances (PSQI) and fatigue (BFI) were assessed at baseline, mid-radiotherapy (T2), during the last week of radiotherapy (T3) and at 1 (T4) and 3 months (T5) after the end of radiotherapy. Patients in the QGTC and LE groups attended three 40-minute classes per week throughout radiotherapy. RESULTS: Ninety patients were randomized to the three groups (QGTC = 26; LE = 26; WLC = 24). QGTC group reported longer sleep duration at mid-XRT (QGTC = 7.01 hours; LE = 6.42; WL = 6.50; p = 0.05) but this difference did not persist over time. There were no group differences in other domains of sleep or fatigue. Exploratory analyses conducted to examine the effect of health-related QOL (EPIC and AUA score) on sleep and fatigue showed significant correlations across multiple domains. CONCLUSIONS: QGTC during radiation for prostate cancer resulted in superior sleep duration midway through radiation, but this effect was not durable and there were no differences in other domains of sleep or fatigue. Exploratory analysis demonstrated that both sleep and fatigue were highly correlated with prostate cancer related physical symptoms. Future mind-body intervention studies should incorporate multi-modal therapy focused on improving physical symptoms in this population. Article Published Date : Aug 21, 2016

Qigong Yi Jinjing Promotes Pulmonary Function, Physical Activity, Quality of Life and Emotion Regulation Self-Efficacy in Patients with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease: A Pilot Study.

Abstract Title: Qigong Yi Jinjing Promotes Pulmonary Function, Physical Activity, Quality of Life and Emotion Regulation Self-Efficacy in Patients with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease: A Pilot Study. Abstract Source: J Altern Complement Med. 2016 Aug 3. Epub 2016 Aug 3. PMID: 27487437 Abstract Author(s): Min Zhang, Guihua Xv, Caifeng Luo, DiJuan Meng, Yan Ji Article Affiliation: Min Zhang Abstract: PURPOSE: The purpose of this pilot study was to examine the effect of a Chinese traditional exercise program, Qigong Yi Jinjing (QYJJ), on patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). METHODS: One hundred and thirty eligible COPD patients were randomly divided into three groups: the QYJJ group (n = 42), the self-management exercise group (n = 43), and the control group (n = 45). Data were collected and analyzed at baseline and again at one, three, and six months. A pulmonary rehabilitation index, consisting of pulmonary function, six-minute walk test, Regulatory Emotion Self-Efficacy questionnaire, and exercise of the COPD Assessment Test widely used to evaluate health-related quality of life (HRQL) in participants with COPD, was measured. RESULTS: Compared with the other groups, participants in QYJJ group had significantly better lung function (forced expiratory volume in one second: F = 8.96, p = 0.000; forced expiratory volume in one second/forced vital capacity: F = 11.55, p = 0.000; the percentage of forced expiratory volume in one second in prediction: F = 24.27, p = 0.000); walked a longer distance (F = 152.52, p = 0.000), and had more satisfactory HRQL (F = 14.08, p = 0.000). QYJJ training also contributed to improving the ability of emotion regulation (F = 36.56, p = 0.000). There were significant positive changes in expressing positive affect (F = 56.25, p = 0.000) and managing despondency/distress (F = 21.58, p = 0.000), apart from the ability to regulate anger/irritation (F = 1.20, p = 0.305). The longer QYJJ is practiced, the more effective the influence is on the pulmonary rehabilitation-related index measures. CONCLUSIONS: These results indicate that QYJJ exercise produced positive effects on pulmonary function, physical activity, emotion regulation self-efficiency (modulating the expression of despondency or distress and experiencing and expressing positive affect), and HRQL in patients with COPD. Article Published Date : Aug 02, 2016

A randomized controlled trial of qigong on fatigue and sleep quality for non-Hodgkin's lymphoma patients undergoing chemotherapy.

Abstract Title: A randomized controlled trial of qigong on fatigue and sleep quality for non-Hodgkin's lymphoma patients undergoing chemotherapy. Abstract Source: Eur J Oncol Nurs. 2016 Aug ;23:81-6. Epub 2016 May 26. PMID: 27456379 Abstract Author(s): Mei-Ling Yeh, Yu-Chu Chung Article Affiliation: Mei-Ling Yeh Abstract: PURPOSE: This study aimed to evaluate the effects of Chan-Chuang qigong exercise in non-Hodgkin's lymphoma patients who were undergoing chemotherapy on fatigue intensity and sleep quality. METHODS: The study was a single-centre, controlled randomized study. One hundred and eight subjects were randomly assigned to the qigong group (n = 54) or control group (n = 54). The qigong group received Chan-Chuang qigong exercise 20-min twice daily for 21 days in the course of the chemotherapy treatment, whereas the control group without special exercise intervention. Outcome measures included fatigue and sleep quality. RESULTS: After the three-week intervention, participants who were in the qigong group had lower fatigue intensity scores than those in the control group. The results of generalized estimating equations (GEE) analyses showed a significant group-by-time interaction effect in average fatigue, worse fatigue, and overall sleep quality (p < 0.001). The average fatigue, worse fatigue, and overall sleep quality significantly decreased over time in the qigong group. CONCLUSIONS: Chan-Chuang qigong exercise could be regarded as an adjunct measure in clinical practice. This study cannot completely discount the possible influence of placebo effects, and more objective clinical outcome measures are needed to produce our findings with long-term follow-up in a randomized controlled study. Article Published Date : Jul 31, 2016

Reiki for Cancer Patients Undergoing Chemotherapy in a Brazilian Hospital: A Pilot Study.

Abstract Title: Reiki for Cancer Patients Undergoing Chemotherapy in a Brazilian Hospital: A Pilot Study. Abstract Source: Holist Nurs Pract. 2016 May-Jun;30(3):174-82. PMID: 27078812 Abstract Author(s): Pamela Siegel, Pedro Mourão Roxo da Motta, Luis G da Silva, Celso Stephan, Carmen Silvia Passos Lima, Nelson Filice de Barros Article Affiliation: Pamela Siegel Abstract: The purpose of this pilot study was to explore whether individualized Reiki given to cancer patients at a Brazilian hospital improved symptoms and well-being. Data from 36 patients who received 5 Reiki sessions were collected using the MYMOP and were compared before and after their treatment and also with 14 patients who did not receive Reiki and who acted as a comparison group. Twenty-one patients reported feeling better, 12 felt worse, and 3 reported no change. Of the comparison group, 6 patients reported feeling better and 8 felt worse. The Reiki practice delivered as part of the integrative care in oncology did produce clinically significant effects, although not statistically significant results, for more than half of the patients undergoing cancer treatment. Article Published Date : Apr 30, 2016

Acute Effects on the Counts of Innate and Adaptive Immune Response Cells After 1 Month of Taoist Qigong Practice.

Abstract Title: Acute Effects on the Counts of Innate and Adaptive Immune Response Cells After 1 Month of Taoist Qigong Practice. Abstract Source: Int J Behav Med. 2016 Apr ;23(2):198-203. PMID: 26370102 Abstract Author(s): Francisca M Vera, Juan M Manzaneque, Francisco M Rodríguez, Rebecca Bendayan, Nieves Fernández, Antonio Alonso Article Affiliation: Francisca M Vera Abstract: BACKGROUND: Qigong is an ancient form of health maintenance, dating back thousands of years, which is part of Traditional Chinese Medicine. Numerous physical as well as mental benefits have been classically ascribed to this traditional mind-body method which integrates slow body movements, breathing, and meditation. Albeit we have already reported an immunomodulatory action of qigong in other investigations, measures were then assessed 1 day after the qigong program ended. PURPOSE: The aim of the present study was to assess the acute effects of Taoist qigong practice on immune cell counts in healthy subjects 1 h after training. METHOD: Forty-three healthy subjects participated in the study of whom 25 were randomly allocated to the experimental group and 18 to the control group. The experimental subjects underwent daily qigong training for 1 month. Blood samples for the quantification of immune parameters (number and percentage of monocytes, neutrophils, eosinophils, total lymphocytes, B lymphocytes, and natural killer (NK) cells) were taken the day before the experiment commenced and 1 h after the last session of the training program ended. As statistical analysis, analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) was performed. RESULTS: Statistically significant differences were found between the experimental and control groups, with the experimental group showing higher values in the number (p = 0.006) and the percentage (p = 0.04) of B lymphocytes, as well as lower values in the percentage of NK cells (p = 0.05), as compared to control. CONCLUSION: This study demonstrates that Taoist qigong is able to exert acute immunomodulatory effects on components of both innate as well as adaptive immune response. Article Published Date : Mar 31, 2016
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Integrating Network Pharmacology and Metabolomics Study on Anti-rheumatic Mechanisms and Antagonistic Effects Against Methotrexate-Induced Toxicity of Qing-Luo-Yin.

Related Articles Integrating Network Pharmacology and Metabolomics Study on Anti-rheumatic Mechanisms and Antagonistic Effects Against Methotrexate-Induced Toxicity of Qing-Luo-Yin. Front Pharmacol. 2018;9:1472 Authors: Zuo J, Wang X, Liu Y, Ye J, Liu Q, Li Y, Li S Abstract Qing-Luo-Yin (QLY) is a traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) formula used to treat Hot Syndrome-related rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Previously, we uncovered partial mechanisms involved in the therapeutic actions of QLY on RA. In this study, we further elucidated its anti-rheumatic mechanisms and investigated its possible interactions with methotrexate (MTX) in vivo using an integrating strategy coupled with network pharmacology and metabolomics techniques. Chemical composition of QLY was characterized by HPLC analysis. Collagen induced arthritis (CIA) was developed in male SD rats. The CIA rats were then assigned into different groups, and received QLY, MTX or QLY+MTX treatments according to the pre-arrangement. Therapeutic effects of QLY and its possible interactions with MTX in vivo were evaluated by clinical parameters, digital radiography assessment, histological/immunohistochemical examination, and serological biomarkers. Mechanisms underlying these actions were deciphered with network pharmacology methods, and further validated by metabolomics clues based on UPLC-Q-TOF/MS analysis of urines. Experimental evidences demonstrated that QLY notably alleviated the severity of CIA and protected joints from destruction. Re-balanced levels of hemoglobin and alanine transaminase in serum indicated reduced MTX-induced hepatic injury and myelosuppression under the co-treatment of QLY. Network-based target prediction found dozens of RA related proteins as potential targets of QLY. Upon the further biological function enrichment analysis, we found that a large amount of them were involved in nucleotide metabolism and immune functions. Metabolomics analysis showed that QLY restored amino acids, fatty acids, and energy metabolisms in CIA rats, which solidly supported its therapeutic effects on CIA. Consistently to findings from network pharmacology analysis, metabolomics study also found altered purine, pyrimidine, and pentose phosphate metabolisms in CIA rats receiving QLY treatment. All these clues suggested that inhibition on nucleic acid synthesis was essential to the immunosuppressive activity of QLY in vivo, and could contribute great importance to its therapeutic effects on CIA. Additionally, QLY induced significant antifolate resistance in rats, which would prevent folate from depletion during long-term MTX treatment, and should account for reduced side effects in combination regimen with MTX and QLY. PMID: 30618762 [PubMed]
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