Therapeutic Actions Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS)

NCBI pubmed

Does transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation reduce pain and improve quality of life in patients with idiopathic chronic orchialgia? A randomized controlled trial.

Related Articles Does transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation reduce pain and improve quality of life in patients with idiopathic chronic orchialgia? A randomized controlled trial. J Pain Res. 2018;11:77-82 Authors: Tantawy SA, Kamel DM, Abdelbasset WK Abstract Background: Chronic orchialgia is defined as testicular pain, which may be either unilateral or bilateral, lasting for more than 3 months. It disturbs a patient's daily activities and quality of life (QoL), inciting the patient to search for treatments to alleviate the pain. It is estimated that 25% of chronic orchialgia cases are idiopathic. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to investigate how effective transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) is in pain reduction and how it consequently affects the QoL in patients with idiopathic chronic orchialgia (ICO). Patients and methods: Seventy-one patients were randomly assigned to group A (study group), which included 36 patients who received TENS and analgesia, and group B (control group), which included 35 patients who received analgesia only. The outcome measures were the participants' demographic data and results of the visual analog scale (VAS) and QoL questionnaire. These outcomes were measured before and after 4 weeks of treatment and at 2-month follow-up. Results: The results showed that compared to pretreatment, there was a significant reduction in pain postintervention and at 2-month follow-up in group A (P<0.0001 and <0.001, respectively; F=7.1) as well as a significant improvement in QoL at these time points (P<0.0001 and <0.0001, respectively). There were no significant differences in the VAS score and QoL in group B at different time points of evaluation. Conclusion: The findings indicate that TENS is effective in reducing pain and improving patients' QoL in cases of ICO. TENS is an easy-to-use, effective, noninvasive, and simple method for ICO-associated pain control and QoL improvement. PMID: 29343983 [PubMed]

Where Are We Headed with Neuromodulation for Overactive Bladder?

Related Articles Where Are We Headed with Neuromodulation for Overactive Bladder? Curr Urol Rep. 2017 Aug;18(8):59 Authors: Jaqua K, Powell CR Abstract Overactive bladder (OAB) affects millions of people around the world and decreases quality of life for those affected. Over the past two decades, significant advances in treatment have transformed the lives of those with OAB. Sacral neuromodulation (SNM), posterior tibial nerve stimulation (PTNS), and dorsal genital nerve stimulation are the most effective contemporary treatment modalities. New techniques and bio-sensing schemes offer promise to advance therapy beyond what is currently available. Current neuromodulation techniques do not use real-time data from the body or input from the patient. Incorporating this is the goal of those pursuing a neuroprosthesis to enhance bladder function for these patients. Dorsal genital nerve, pudendal nerve, S3 afferent nerve roots, and S1 and S2 ganglia have all been used as targets for stimulation. Some of these have also been used as sources of afferent nerve information to detect significant bladder events and even to estimate the fullness of the bladder. As technology improves, an intelligent neuroprosthesis with the ability to sense significant bladder events may revolutionize treatment of OAB. PMID: 28656519 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Noninvasive neurostimulation methods for migraine therapy: The available evidence.

Related Articles Noninvasive neurostimulation methods for migraine therapy: The available evidence. Cephalalgia. 2016 Oct;36(12):1170-1180 Authors: Schoenen J, Roberta B, Magis D, Coppola G Abstract Background Migraine is one of the most disabling neurological disorders. The current pharmacological armamentarium is not satisfying for a large proportion of patients because the responder rate does not exceed 50% on average and the most effective drugs often induce intolerable side effects. During recent years, noninvasive central and peripheral neuromodulation methods have been explored for migraine treatment. Overview A review of the available evidence suggests that noninvasive neuromodulation techniques could be beneficial for migraine patients. The transcranial stimulation methods allow modulating selectively cortical activity and can thus be curtailed to the patient's pathophysiological profile, while transcutaneous stimulation of pericranial nerves likely modulates central pain control centers. Occipital single-pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation and transcutaneous supraorbital stimulation have the strongest evidence respectively for acute and preventive treatment. Transcranial direct current stimulation and repetitive magnetic stimulation are promising in pilot studies, but large sham-controlled trials are not yet available. Conclusions The noninvasive neurostimulation methods are promising for migraine treatment and devoid of serious adverse effects allowing their combination with drug therapies. Their application in clinical practice will depend on the industry's capacity to develop portable and user-friendly devices, and on the scientists' capacity to prove their efficacy in randomized sham-controlled trials. PMID: 27026674 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]