Therapeutic Actions Mindfulness Training

NCBI pubmed

Being there and reconnecting: midwives' perceptions of the impact of Mindfulness training on their practice.

Related Articles Being there and reconnecting: midwives' perceptions of the impact of Mindfulness training on their practice. J Clin Nurs. 2017 Nov 17;: Authors: Hunter L, Snow S, Warriner S Abstract OBJECTIVE: To ascertain how midwives perceived attending a mindfulness course impacted on their professional practice, particularly in regard to any stress they experienced at work. DESIGN: A qualitative study using Interpretive Phenomenological Analysis. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with nine midwives. SETTING: A large maternity Trust in the United Kingdom. INTERVENTION: An eight-week Mindfulness course, adapted from Mindfulness-based Cognitive Therapy. FINDINGS: Four superordinate themes were identified: 'being challenged and committing', 'containing the self', 'reconnecting', and 'moving forward with confidence'. Focusing on the present moment enabled participants better to identify the boundary between self and other. This led to an increased sense of control and a reconnection with and reframing of relationships with colleagues and the women in their care. KEY CONCLUSIONS: Mindfulness may provide an effective way to address the high levels of stress, role dissatisfaction and workplace bullying found in Midwifery, by improving both the working environment and patient care. The pivotal role of positive workplace relationships in this process resonates with other nursing research and with contemporary philosophical thought. RELEVANCE TO CLINICAL PRACTICE: This study adds to a body of evidence which suggests investing in the wellbeing of midwifery staff improves both job satisfaction and women's experiences of care. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. PMID: 29149499 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

Veterans Group Exercise: A randomized pilot trial of an Integrative Exercise program for veterans with posttraumatic stress.

Related Articles Veterans Group Exercise: A randomized pilot trial of an Integrative Exercise program for veterans with posttraumatic stress. J Affect Disord. 2017 Nov 04;227:345-352 Authors: Goldstein LA, Mehling WE, Metzler TJ, Cohen BE, Barnes DE, Choucroun GJ, Silver A, Talbot LS, Maguen S, Hlavin JA, Chesney MA, Neylan TC Abstract BACKGROUND: Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is prevalent among military veterans and is associated with significant negative health outcomes. However, stigma and other barriers to care prevent many veterans from pursuing traditional mental health treatment. We developed a group-based Integrative Exercise (IE) program combining aerobic and resistance exercise, which is familiar to veterans, with mindfulness-based practices suited to veterans with PTSD. This study aimed to evaluate the effects of IE on PTSD symptom severity and quality of life, as well as assess the feasibility and acceptability of IE. METHODS: Veterans (N = 47) were randomized to either IE or waitlist control (WL). Veterans in IE were asked to attend three 1-h group exercise sessions for 12 weeks. RESULTS: Compared with WL, veterans randomized to IE demonstrated a greater reduction in PTSD symptom severity (d = -.90), a greater improvement in psychological quality of life (d = .53) and a smaller relative improvement in physical quality of life (d = .30) Veterans' ratings of IE indicated high feasibility and acceptability. LIMITATIONS: The sample was relatively small and recruited from one site. The comparison condition was an inactive control. CONCLUSIONS: This initial study suggests that IE is an innovative approach to treating veterans with symptoms of PTSD that reduces symptoms of posttraumatic stress and improves psychological quality of life. This approach to recovery may expand the reach of PTSD treatment into non-traditional settings and to veterans who may prefer a familiar activity, such as exercise, over medication or psychotherapy. PMID: 29145076 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]