Therapeutic Actions EXERCISE Resistance Training

NCBI pubmed

Men exhibit greater fatigue resistance than women in alternated bench press and leg press exercises.

Related Articles Men exhibit greater fatigue resistance than women in alternated bench press and leg press exercises. J Sports Med Phys Fitness. 2017 Nov 17;: Authors: Monteiro ER, Steele J, Novaes JS, Brown AF, Cavanaugh MT, Vingren JL, Behm DG Abstract BACKGROUND: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the influence of sex, exercise order, and rest interval on neuromuscular fatigue resistance for an alternated strength training sequence of bench press (BP) and leg press (LP) exercises. METHODS: Twelve women and 16 men, both recreationally trained, performed four sessions in a random order: 1) BP followed by LP with three-minutes rest (BP+LP with rest), 2) LP followed by BP with three-minutes rest (LP+BP with rest), 3) BP followed by LP without rest interval (BP+LP no rest), and 4) LP followed by BP without rest interval (LP+BP no rest). Participants performed four sets with 100% of 10RM load to concentric failure with the goal of completing the maximum number of repetitions in both exercises. The fatigue index was analyzed from the first and last sets of each exercise bout. RESULTS: A main effect for sex showed that women exhibited 25.5% (p=0.001) and 24.5% (p=0.001) greater BP and LP fatigue than men respectively when performing 10RM. Men exhibited greater BP (p<0.0001; 34.1%) and LP (p<0.0001; 30.5%) fatigue resistance when a rest period was provided. Men did not show an exercise order effect for BP fatigue and exhibited greater (p=0.0003; 14.5%) LP fatigue resistance when BP was performed first. CONCLUSIONS: The present study demonstrated the greater fatigue resistance of men when performing 10RM BP and LP exercises. Since men tend to experience less fatigue with the second exercise in the exercise pairing, women's training programs should be adjusted to ensure they do not parallel men's resistance training programs. PMID: 29148630 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

Is more always better? How different 'doses' of exercise after incomplete spinal cord injury affects the membrane properties of deep dorsal horn interneurons.

Related Articles Is more always better? How different 'doses' of exercise after incomplete spinal cord injury affects the membrane properties of deep dorsal horn interneurons. Exp Neurol. 2017 Nov 13;: Authors: Rank MM, Galea MP, Callister R, Callister RJ Abstract Interneurons in the deep dorsal horn (DDH) of the spinal cord process somatosensory input, and form an important link between upper and lower motoneurons to subsequently shape motor output. Exercise training after SCI is known to improve functional motor recovery, but little is known about the mechanisms within spinal cord neurons that underlie these improvements. Here we investigate how the properties of DDH interneurons are affected by spinal cord injury (SCI) alone, and SCI in combination with different 'doses' of treadmill exercise training (3, 6, and 9wks). In an adult mouse hemisection model of SCI we used whole-cell patch-clamp electrophysiology to record intrinsic, AP firing and gain modulation properties from DDH interneurons in a horizontal spinal cord slice preparation. We find that neurons within two segments of the injury, both ipsi- and contralateral to the hemisection, are similarly affected by SCI and SCI plus exercise. The passive intrinsic membrane properties input resistance (Rin) and rheobase are sensitive to the effects of recovery time and exercise training after SCI thus altering DDH interneuron excitability. Conversely, select active membrane properties are largely unaffected by either SCI or exercise training. SCI itself causes a mismatch in the expression of voltage-gated subthreshold currents and AP discharge firing type. Over time after SCI, and especially with exercise training (9wks), this mismatched expression is exacerbated. Lastly, amplification properties (i.e. gain of frequency-current relationship) of DDH interneurons are altered by SCI alone and recover spontaneously with no clear effect of exercise training. These results suggest a larger 'dose' of exercise training (9wks) has a strong and selective effect on specific membrane properties, and on the output of interneurons in the vicinity of a SCI. These electrophysiological data provide new insights into the plasticity of DDH interneurons and the mechanisms by which exercise therapy after SCI can improve recovery. PMID: 29146456 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

Skeletal muscle overexpression of nicotinamide phosphoribosyl transferase in mice coupled with voluntary exercise augments exercise endurance.

Related Articles Skeletal muscle overexpression of nicotinamide phosphoribosyl transferase in mice coupled with voluntary exercise augments exercise endurance. Mol Metab. 2017 Nov 06;: Authors: Costford SR, Brouwers B, Hopf ME, Sparks LM, Dispagna M, Gomes AP, Cornnell HH, Petucci C, Phelan P, Xie H, Yi F, Walter GA, Osborne TF, Sinclair DA, Mynatt RL, Ayala JE, Gardell SJ, Smith SR Abstract OBJECTIVE: Nicotinamide phosphoribosyl transferase (NAMPT) is the rate-limiting enzyme in the salvage pathway that produces nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+)), an essential co-substrate regulating a myriad of signaling pathways. We produced a mouse that overexpressed NAMPT in skeletal muscle (NamptTg) and hypothesized that NamptTg mice would have increased oxidative capacity, endurance performance, and mitochondrial gene expression, and would be rescued from metabolic abnormalities that developed with high fat diet (HFD) feeding. METHODS: Insulin sensitivity (hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp) was assessed in NamptTg and WT mice fed very high fat diet (VHFD, 60% by kcal) or chow diet (CD). The aerobic capacity (VO2max) and endurance performance of NamptTg and WT mice before and after 7 weeks of voluntary exercise training (running wheel in home cage) or sedentary conditions (no running wheel) were measured. Skeletal muscle mitochondrial gene expression was also measured in exercised and sedentary mice and in mice fed HFD (45% by kcal) or low fat diet (LFD, 10% by kcal). RESULTS: NAMPT enzyme activity in skeletal muscle was 7-fold higher in NamptTg mice versus WT mice. There was a concomitant 1.6-fold elevation of skeletal muscle NAD(+). NamptTg mice fed VHFD were partially protected against body weight gain, but not against insulin resistance. Notably, voluntary exercise training elicited a 3-fold higher exercise endurance in NamptTg versus WT mice. Mitochondrial gene expression was higher in NamptTg mice compared to WT mice, especially when fed HFD. Mitochondrial gene expression was higher in exercised NamptTg mice than in sedentary WT mice. CONCLUSIONS: Our studies have unveiled a fascinating interaction between elevated NAMPT activity in skeletal muscle and voluntary exercise that was manifest as a striking improvement in exercise endurance. PMID: 29146412 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

COPD online-rehabilitation versus conventional COPD rehabilitation - rationale and design for a multicenter randomized controlled trial study protocol (CORe trial).

Related Articles COPD online-rehabilitation versus conventional COPD rehabilitation - rationale and design for a multicenter randomized controlled trial study protocol (CORe trial). BMC Pulm Med. 2017 Nov 16;17(1):140 Authors: Hansen H, Bieler T, Beyer N, Godtfredsen N, Kallemose T, Frølich A Abstract BACKGROUND: Rehabilitation of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a key treatment in COPD. However, despite the existing evidence and a strong recommendation from lung associations worldwide, 50% of patients with COPD decline to participate in COPD rehabilitation program and 30-50% drop-out before completion. The main reasons are severe symptoms, inflexible accessibility and necessity for transportation. Currently there are no well-established and evident rehabilitation alternatives. Supervised online screen rehabilitation could be a useful approach to increase accessibility and compliance. The aim of this multicenter RCT study is to compare the potential benefits of a 10-week online COPD rehabilitation program (CORe) with conventional outpatient COPD rehabilitation (CCRe). METHODS: This study is a randomized assessor- and statistician blinded superiority multicenter trial with two parallel groups, employing 1:1 allocation to the intervention and the comparison group.On the basis of a sample size calculation, 134 patients with severe or very severe COPD and eligible to conventional hospital based outpatient COPD rehabilitation will be included and randomized from eight different hospitals. The CORe intervention group receives group supervised resistance- and endurance training and patient education, 60 min, three times/week for 10 weeks at home via online-screen. The CCRe comparison group receives group based supervised resistance- and endurance training and patient education, 90 min, two times/week for 10 weeks (two hospitals) or 12 weeks (six hospitals) in groups at the local hospital. The primary outcome is change in the 6-min walking distance after 10/12 weeks; the secondary outcomes are changes in 30 s sit-to-stand chair test, physical activity level, symptoms, anxiety and depression symptoms, disease specific and generic quality of life. Primary endpoint is 10/12 weeks from baseline, while secondary endpoints are 22, 36, 62 weeks from baseline assessments. DISCUSSION: The study will likely contribute to knowledge regarding COPD tele-rehabilitation and to which extent it is more feasible and thereby more efficient than conventional COPD rehabilitation in patients with severe and very severe COPD. TRIAL REGISTRATION: Clinicaltrials.gov Identifier: NCT02667171 . Registration data: January 28th 2016. PMID: 29145831 [PubMed - in process]

Genetic testing for exercise prescription and injury prevention: AIS-Athlome consortium-FIMS joint statement.

Related Articles Genetic testing for exercise prescription and injury prevention: AIS-Athlome consortium-FIMS joint statement. BMC Genomics. 2017 Nov 14;18(Suppl 8):818 Authors: Vlahovich N, Hughes DC, Griffiths LR, Wang G, Pitsiladis YP, Pigozzi F, Bachl N, Eynon N Abstract BACKGROUND: There has been considerable growth in basic knowledge and understanding of how genes are influencing response to exercise training and predisposition to injuries and chronic diseases. On the basis of this knowledge, clinical genetic tests may in the future allow the personalisation and optimisation of physical activity, thus providing an avenue for increased efficiency of exercise prescription for health and disease. RESULTS: This review provides an overview of the current status of genetic testing for the purposes of exercise prescription and injury prevention. As such there are a variety of potential uses for genetic testing, including identification of risks associated with participation in sport and understanding individual response to particular types of exercise. However, there are many challenges remaining before genetic testing has evidence-based practical applications; including adoption of international standards for genomics research, as well as resistance against the agendas driven by direct-to-consumer genetic testing companies. Here we propose a way forward to develop an evidence-based approach to support genetic testing for exercise prescription and injury prevention. CONCLUSION: Based on current knowledge, there is no current clinical application for genetic testing in the area of exercise prescription and injury prevention, however the necessary steps are outlined for the development of evidence-based clinical applications involving genetic testing. PMID: 29143596 [PubMed - in process]

The Effects of Resistance Exercise on Biomarkers of Breast Cancer Prognosis: A Pooled Analysis of Three Randomized Trials.

Related Articles The Effects of Resistance Exercise on Biomarkers of Breast Cancer Prognosis: A Pooled Analysis of Three Randomized Trials. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2017 Nov 15;: Authors: Winters-Stone K, Wood LJ, Stoyles S, Dieckmann N Abstract BACKGROUND: Using a secondary data analysis from randomized controlled trials comparing one year of resistance exercise (N=109) to a placebo control condition (N=106) in postmenopausal, post-treatment breast cancer survivors, we investigated the influence of resistance training and changes in body composition on markers associated with cancer progression. METHODS: Measures included serum levels of insulin, IGF-1, IGFBP1-3, leptin, serum amyloid A (SAA), adiponectin, C-reactive protein (CRP), IL-1β, TNF-α, IL-6, and IL-8 and body composition (total, lean and fat mass in kg) by DXA at baseline, 6, and 12-months. Linear mixed effects models were used to examine the association between group, biomarkers, and body composition and whether or not changes in muscle strength or body composition influenced the effect of exercise on biomarkers. RESULTS: CRP decreased over time among women participating in resistance training compared to increases in controls (p=0.045). In stratified analyses and compared to increases in controls, women who gained strength reduced CRP (p=0.003) and maintained levels of IL1-β and IL6. Among exercisers who lost weight (>2kg), CRP (p=0.045), leptin (p<0.01) and SAA (p=0.029) decreased, while IGF-BP1 (p=0.036) increased compared to controls. CONCLUSIONS: Resistance training may lower inflammation and improve insulin pathway profiles, but the magnitude and degree of benefit from exercise may depend upon whether or not women gained strength, a possible marker of compliance with training, and/or lost weight during exercise. IMPACT: Future resistance training trials should consider these potential influencing factors as they may determine how well exercise can slow cancer progression and prevent disease recurrence. PMID: 29141853 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

Microvascular Adaptations to Exercise: Protective Effect of PGC-1 Alpha.

Related Articles Microvascular Adaptations to Exercise: Protective Effect of PGC-1 Alpha. Am J Hypertens. 2017 Nov 11;: Authors: Kadlec AO, Barnes C, Durand MJ, Gutterman DD Abstract BACKGROUND: Sedentary behavior and obesity are major risk factors for cardiovascular disease. Regular physical activity has independent protective effects on the cardiovascular system, but the mechanisms responsible remain elusive. Recent studies suggest that the protein peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator 1-alpha (PGC-1α) participates in the response to exercise training. We hypothesized that the arterioles of athletes maintain dilation to flow despite combined inhibition of multiple vasodilators, but loss of PGC-1α renders these vessels susceptible to inhibition of a single vasodilator pathway. In addition, arterioles from overweight and obese individuals will display an an exercise-like phenotype when PGC-1α is activated. METHODS: Isolated arterioles from exercise-trained (ET) and from mildly overweight or obese subjects (body mass index >25) were cannulated, and changes in lumen diameter in response to graded increases in flow were recorded in the absence and presence of compounds that inhibit various endothelium-dependent vasodilators. RESULTS: Microvessels of ET subjects displayed robust dilation that could not be inhibited through targeting the combination of nitric oxide, prostaglandins, and hydrogen peroxide, but were inhibited via interference with membrane hyperpolarization. Loss of PGC-1α (siRNA) in the microcirculation of ET subjects eliminates this vasodilatory robustness rendering vessels susceptible to blockade of H2O2 alone. Pharmacological activation of PGC-1α with alpha-lipoic acid in isolated microvessels from sedentary, overweight, and obese subjects increases arteriolar resistance to vasodilator blockade and protects against acute increases in intraluminal pressure. CONCLUSIONS: These findings suggest that the microvascular adaptations to exercise training, and the exercise-induced protection against acute vascular stress in overweight/obese subjects, are mediated by PGC-1α. PMID: 29140431 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

The Reliability of Individualized Load-Velocity Profiles.

Related Articles The Reliability of Individualized Load-Velocity Profiles. Int J Sports Physiol Perform. 2017 Nov 15;:1-22 Authors: Banyard HG, Nosaka K, Vernon AD, Haff GG Abstract PURPOSE: This study examined the reliability of peak velocity (PV), mean propulsive velocity (MPV), and mean velocity (MV) in the development of load-velocity profiles (LVP) in the full depth free-weight back squat performed with maximal concentric effort. METHODS: Eighteen resistance-trained men performed a baseline one-repetition maximum (1RM) back squat trial and three subsequent 1RM trials used for reliability analyses, with 48-hours interval between trials. 1RM trials comprised lifts from six relative loads including 20, 40, 60, 80, 90, and 100% 1RM. Individualized LVPs for PV, MPV, or MV were derived from loads that were highly reliable based on the following criteria: intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC) >0.70, coefficient of variation (CV) ≤10%, and Cohen's d effect size (ES) <0.60. RESULTS: PV was highly reliable at all six loads. Importantly, MPV and MV were highly reliable at 20, 40, 60, 80 and 90% but not 100% 1RM (MPV: ICC=0.66, CV=18.0%, ES=0.10, standard error of the estimate [SEM]=0.04m·s(-1); MV: ICC=0.55, CV=19.4%, ES=0.08, SEM=0.04m·s(-1)). When considering the reliable ranges, almost perfect correlations were observed for LVPs derived from PV20-100% (r=0.91-0.93), MPV20-90% (r=0.92-0.94) and MV20-90% (r=0.94-0.95). Furthermore, the LVPs were not significantly different (p>0.05) between trials, movement velocities, or between linear regression versus second order polynomial fits. CONCLUSIONS: PV20-100%, MPV20-90%, and MV20-90% are reliable and can be utilized to develop LVPs using linear regression. Conceptually, LVPs can be used to monitor changes in movement velocity and employed as a method for adjusting sessional training loads according to daily readiness. PMID: 29140148 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

Adding high-intensity interval training to conventional training modalities: optimizing health-related outcomes during chemotherapy for breast cancer: the OptiTrain randomized controlled trial.

Related Articles Adding high-intensity interval training to conventional training modalities: optimizing health-related outcomes during chemotherapy for breast cancer: the OptiTrain randomized controlled trial. Breast Cancer Res Treat. 2017 Nov 14;: Authors: Mijwel S, Backman M, Bolam KA, Jervaeus A, Sundberg CJ, Margolin S, Browall M, Rundqvist H, Wengström Y Abstract PURPOSE: Exercise training is an effective and safe way to counteract cancer-related fatigue (CRF) and to improve health-related quality of life (HRQoL). High-intensity interval training has proven beneficial for the health of clinical populations. The aim of this randomized controlled trial was to compare the effects of resistance and high-intensity interval training (RT-HIIT), and moderate-intensity aerobic and high-intensity interval training (AT-HIIT) to usual care (UC) in women with breast cancer undergoing chemotherapy. The primary endpoint was CRF and the secondary endpoints were HRQoL and cancer treatment-related symptoms. METHODS: Two hundred and forty women planned to undergo chemotherapy were randomized to supervised RT-HIIT, AT-HIIT, or UC. Measurements were performed at baseline and at 16 weeks. Questionnaires included Piper Fatigue Scale, EORTC-QLQ-C30, and Memorial Symptom Assessment Scale. RESULTS: The RT-HIIT group was superior to UC for CRF: total CRF (p = 0.02), behavior/daily life (p = 0.01), and sensory/physical (p = 0.03) CRF. Role functioning significantly improved while cognitive functioning was unchanged for RT-HIIT compared to declines shown in the UC group (p = 0.04). AT-HIIT significantly improved emotional functioning versus UC (p = 0.01) and was superior to UC for pain symptoms (p = 0.03). RT-HIIT reported a reduced symptom burden, while AT-HIIT remained stable compared to deteriorations shown by UC (p < 0.01). Only RT-HIIT was superior to UC for total symptoms (p < 0.01). CONCLUSIONS: 16 weeks of resistance and HIIT was effective in preventing increases in CRF and in reducing symptom burden for patients during chemotherapy for breast cancer. These findings add to a growing body of evidence supporting the inclusion of structured exercise prescriptions, including HIIT, as a vital component of cancer rehabilitation. TRIAL REGISTRATION: Clinicaltrials.gov Registration Number: NCT02522260. PMID: 29139007 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

Effect of creatine supplementation during resistance training on lean tissue mass and muscular strength in older adults: a meta-analysis.

Related Articles Effect of creatine supplementation during resistance training on lean tissue mass and muscular strength in older adults: a meta-analysis. Open Access J Sports Med. 2017;8:213-226 Authors: Chilibeck PD, Kaviani M, Candow DG, Zello GA Abstract The loss of muscle mass and strength with aging results in significant functional impairment. Creatine supplementation has been used in combination with resistance training as a strategy for increasing lean tissue mass and muscle strength in older adults, but results across studies are equivocal. We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials of creatine supplementation during resistance training in older adults with lean tissue mass, chest press strength, and leg press strength as outcomes by searching PubMed and SPORTDiscus databases. Twenty-two studies were included in our meta-analysis with 721 participants (both men and women; with a mean age of 57-70 years across studies) randomized to creatine supplementation or placebo during resistance training 2-3 days/week for 7-52 weeks. Creatine supplementation resulted in greater increases in lean tissue mass (mean difference =1.37 kg [95% CI =0.97-1.76]; p<0.00001), chest press strength (standardized mean difference [SMD] =0.35 [0.16-0.53]; p=0.0002), and leg press strength (SMD =0.24 [0.05-0.43]; p=0.01). A number of mechanisms exist by which creatine may increase lean tissue mass and muscular strength. These are included in a narrative review in the discussion section of this article. In summary, creatine supplementation increases lean tissue mass and upper and lower body muscular strength during resistance training of older adults, but potential mechanisms by which creatine exerts these positive effects have yet to be evaluated extensively. PMID: 29138605 [PubMed]

A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Proteomics Literature on the Response of Human Skeletal Muscle to Obesity/Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus (T2DM) Versus Exercise Training.

Related Articles A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Proteomics Literature on the Response of Human Skeletal Muscle to Obesity/Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus (T2DM) Versus Exercise Training. Proteomes. 2017 Nov 11;5(4): Authors: Srisawat K, Shepherd SO, Lisboa PJ, Burniston JG Abstract We performed a systematic review and meta-analysis of proteomics literature that reports human skeletal muscle responses in the context of either pathological decline associated with obesity/T2DM and physiological adaptations to exercise training. Literature was collected from PubMed and DOAJ databases following PRISMA guidelines using the search terms 'proteom*', and 'skeletal muscle' combined with either 'obesity, insulin resistance, diabetes, impaired glucose tolerance' or 'exercise, training'. Eleven studies were included in the systematic review, and meta-analysis was performed on a sub-set (four studies) of the reviewed literature that reported the necessary primary data. The majority of proteins (n = 73) more abundant in the muscle of obese/T2DM individuals were unique to this group and not reported to be responsive to exercise training. The main response of skeletal muscle to exercise training was a greater abundance of proteins of the mitochondrial electron transport chain, tricarboxylic acid cycle and mitochondrial respiratory chain complex I assembly. In total, five proteins were less abundant in muscle of obese/T2DM individuals and were also reported to be more abundant in the muscle of endurance-trained individuals, suggesting one of the major mechanisms of exercise-induced protection against the deleterious effects of obesity/T2DM occurs at complex I of the electron transport chain. PMID: 29137117 [PubMed]

Comparison of Polar M600 Optical Heart Rate and ECG Heart Rate during Exercise.

Related Articles Comparison of Polar M600 Optical Heart Rate and ECG Heart Rate during Exercise. Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2017 Dec;49(12):2600-2607 Authors: Horton JF, Stergiou P, Fung TS, Katz L Abstract PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the accuracy of the Polar M600 optical heart rate (OHR) sensor compared with ECG heart rate (HR) measurement during various physical activities. METHODS: Thirty-six subjects participated in a continuous 76-min testing session, which included rest, cycling warm-up, cycling intervals, circuit weight training, treadmill intervals, and recovery. HR was measured using a three-lead ECG configuration and a Polar M600 Sport Watch on the left wrist. Statistical analyses included OHR percent accuracy, mean difference, mean absolute error, Bland-Altman plots, and a repeated-measures generalized estimating equation design. OHR percent accuracy was calculated as the percentage of occurrences where OHR measurement was within and including ±5 bpm from the ECG HR value. RESULTS: Of the four exercise phases performed, the highest OHR percent accuracy was found during cycle intervals (91.8%), and the lowest OHR percent accuracy occurred during circuit weight training (34.5%). OHR percent accuracy improved steadily within exercise transitions during cycle intervals to a maximum of 98.5% and during treadmill intervals to a maximum of 89.0%. Lags in HR calculated by the Polar M600 OHR sensor existed in comparison to ECG HR, when exercise intensity changed until steady state occurred. There was a tendency for OHR underestimation during intensity increases and overestimation during intensity decreases. No statistically significant interaction effect with device was found in this sample on the basis of sex, body mass index, V˙O2max, skin type, or wrist size. CONCLUSIONS: The Polar M600 was accurate during periods of steady-state cycling, walking, jogging, and running, but less accurate during some exercise intensity changes, which may be attributed to factors related to total peripheral resistance changes and pulse pressure. PMID: 29135785 [PubMed - in process]