Cybermedlife - Therapeutic Actions Craniosacral Therapy


Influence of Craniosacral Therapy on Anxiety, Depression and Quality of Life in Patients with Fibromyalgia.

Abstract Title: Influence of Craniosacral Therapy on Anxiety, Depression and Quality of Life in Patients with Fibromyalgia. Abstract Source: Evid Based Complement Alternat Med. 2009 Sep 3. PMID: 19729492 Abstract Author(s): Guillermo A Matarán-Peñarrocha, Adelaida María Castro-Sánchez, Gloria Carballo García, Carmen Moreno-Lorenzo, Tesifón Parrón Carreño, María Dolores Onieva Zafra Abstract: Fibromyalgia is considered as a combination of physical, psychological and social disabilities. The causes of pathologic mechanism underlying fibromyalgia are unknown, but fibromyalgia may lead to reduced quality of life. The objective of this study was to analyze the repercussions of craniosacral therapy on depression, anxiety and quality of life in fibromyalgia patients with painful symptoms. An experimental, double-blind longitudinal clinical trial design was undertaken. Eighty-four patients diagnosed with fibromyalgia were randomly assigned to an intervention group (craniosacral therapy) or placebo group (simulated treatment with disconnected ultrasound). The treatment period was 25 weeks. Anxiety, pain, sleep quality, depression and quality of life were determined at baseline and at 10 min, 6 months and 1-year post-treatment. State anxiety and trait anxiety, pain, quality of life and Pittsburgh sleep quality index were significantly higher in the intervention versus placebo group after the treatment period and at the 6-month follow-up. However, at the 1-year follow-up, the groups only differed in the Pittsburgh sleep quality index. Approaching fibromyalgia by means of craniosacral therapy contributes to improving anxiety and quality of life levels in these patients. Article Published Date : Sep 03, 2009

Cerebrospinal fluid stasis and its clinical significance.

Abstract Title: Cerebrospinal fluid stasis and its clinical significance. Abstract Source: Altern Ther Health Med. 2009 May-Jun;15(3):54-60. PMID: 19472865 Abstract Author(s): James M Whedon, Donald Glassey Article Affiliation: The Dartmouth Institute for Health Policy and Clinical Practice in Lebanon, New Hampshire, USA. Abstract: We hypothesize that stasis of the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) occurs commonly and is detrimental to health. Physiologic factors affecting the normal circulation of CSF include cardiovascular, respiratory, and vasomotor influences. The CSF maintains the electrolytic environment of the central nervous system (CNS), influences systemic acid-base balance, serves as a medium for the supply of nutrients to neuronal and glial cells, functions as a lymphatic system for the CNS by removing the waste products of cellular metabolism, and transports hormones, neurotransmitters, releasing factors, and other neuropeptides throughout the CNS. Physiologic impedance or cessation of CSF flow may occur commonly in the absence of degenerative changes or pathology and may compromise the normal physiologic functions of the CSF. CSF appears to be particularly prone to stasis within the spinal canal. CSF stasis may be associated with adverse mechanical cord tension, vertebral subluxation syndrome, reduced cranial rhythmic impulse, and restricted respiratory function. Increased sympathetic tone, facilitated spinal segments, dural tension, and decreased CSF flow have been described as closely related aspects of an overall pattern of structural and energetic dysfunction in the axial skeleton and CNS. Therapies directed at affecting CSF flow include osteopathic care (especially cranial manipulation), craniosacral therapy, chiropractic adjustment of the spine and cranium, Network Care (formerly Network Chiropractic), massage therapy (including lymphatic drainage techniques), yoga, therapeutic breath-work, and cerebrospinal fluid technique. Further investigation into the nature and causation of CSF stasis, its potential effects upon human health, and effective therapies for its correction is warranted. Article Published Date : May 01, 2009

Effect of craniosacral therapy on lower urinary tract signs and symptoms in multiple sclerosis.

Abstract Title: Effect of craniosacral therapy on lower urinary tract signs and symptoms in multiple sclerosis. Abstract Source: Complement Ther Clin Pract. 2009 May;15(2):72-5. Epub 2009 Jan 30. PMID: 19341983 Abstract Author(s): Gil Raviv, Shai Shefi, Dalia Nizani, Anat Achiron Abstract: To examine whether craniosacral therapy improves lower urinary tract symptoms of multiple sclerosis (MS) patients. A prospective cohort study. Out-patient clinic of multiple sclerosis center in a referral medical center. Hands on craniosacral therapy (CST). Change in lower urinary tract symptoms, post voiding residual volume and quality of life. Patients from our multiple sclerosis clinic were assessed before and after craniosacral therapy. Evaluation included neurological examination, disability status determination, ultrasonographic post voiding residual volume estimation and questionnaires regarding lower urinary tract symptoms and quality of life. Twenty eight patients met eligibility criteria and were included in this study. Comparison of post voiding residual volume, lower urinary tract symptoms and quality of life before and after craniosacral therapy revealed a significant improvement (0.001>p>0.0001). CST was found to be an effective means for treating lower urinary tract symptoms and improving quality of life in MS patients. Article Published Date : May 01, 2009

Craniosacral still point technique: exploring its effects in individuals with dementia.

Abstract Title: Craniosacral still point technique: exploring its effects in individuals with dementia. Abstract Source: J Gerontol Nurs. 2008 Mar;34(3):36-45. PMID: 18350746 Abstract Author(s): Linda A Gerdner, Laura K Hart, M Bridget Zimmerman Abstract: A mixed methodology was used to explore the effects of craniosacral still point technique (CSPT) in 9 older adults with dementia. Participants were monitored at baseline (3 weeks), intervention (6 weeks), and postintervention (3 weeks) using the modified Cohen-Mansfield Agitation Inventory (M-CMAI). CSPT was implemented daily for 6 weeks by a certified craniosacral therapist. Findings indicated a statistically significant reduction in M-CMAI total and subscale scores during the intervention period. This reduction continued during postintervention for subscale scores of physical nonaggression and verbal agitation. Staff and family interviews provided convergent validity to the quantitative findings. Participants were also more cooperative during caregiving activities and displayed meaningful interactions. Article Published Date : Mar 01, 2008

The impact of acupuncture and craniosacral therapy interventions on clinical outcomes in adults with asthma.

Abstract Title: The impact of acupuncture and craniosacral therapy interventions on clinical outcomes in adults with asthma. Abstract Source: Explore (NY). 2007 Jan-Feb;3(1):28-36. PMID: 17234566 Abstract Author(s): Lewis Mehl-Madrona, Benjamin Kligler, Shoshana Silverman, Holly Lynton, Woodson Merrell Abstract: OBJECTIVE: Synergy has been proposed between modalities operating at different levels of action. Acupuncture and craniosacral therapy are two very different modalities for which synergy has been proposed. This study sought to test for such synergy and to determine if complementary therapies would improve pulmonary function and quality of life for people suffering from asthma, as well as reducing anxiety, depression, and medication usage. DESIGN: Subjects were randomly assignment to one of five groups: acupuncture, craniosacral therapy, acupuncture and craniosacral, attention control, and waiting list control. METHODS: Subjects received 12 sessions of equal length with pretreatment and posttreatment assessment of pulmonary function, asthma quality of life, depression, and anxiety. Medication use was also assessed. RESULTS: Synergy was not demonstrated. When treatment was compared with the control group, statistically treatment was significantly better than the control group in improving asthma quality of life, whereas reducing medication use with pulmonary function test results remained the same. However, the combination of acupuncture and craniosacral treatment was not superior to each therapy alone. In fact, although all active patients received 12 treatment sessions, those who received all treatments from one practitioner had statistically significant reductions in anxiety when compared with those receiving the same number of treatments from multiple practitioners. No effects on depression were found. CONCLUSIONS: Acupuncture and/or craniosacral therapy are potentially useful adjuncts to the conventional care of adults with asthma, but the combination of the two does not provide additional benefit over each therapy alone. Article Published Date : Jan 01, 2007
Therapeutic Actions Craniosacral Therapy

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CranioSacral Therapy, Brain Injury, and American Football: Time for a Convergence.

Related Articles CranioSacral Therapy, Brain Injury, and American Football: Time for a Convergence. J Altern Complement Med. 2017 Nov 07;: Authors: Leskowitz E PMID: 29111776 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]