Therapeutic Actions Kindness

NCBI pubmed

Barriers to self-compassion for female survivors of childhood maltreatment: The roles of fear of self-compassion and psychological inflexibility.

Related Articles Barriers to self-compassion for female survivors of childhood maltreatment: The roles of fear of self-compassion and psychological inflexibility. Child Abuse Negl. 2017 Nov 13;76:216-224 Authors: Boykin DM, Himmerich SJ, Pinciotti CM, Miller LM, Miron LR, Orcutt HK Abstract Preliminary evidence has demonstrated the benefits of targeting self-compassion in the treatment of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). However, survivors of childhood maltreatment may present with unique challenges that compromise the effectiveness of these and other PTSD treatments. Specifically, childhood maltreatment victims often exhibit a marked fear and active resistance of self-kindness and warmth (i.e., fear of self-compassion). Victims may also attempt to control distressing internal experiences in a way that hinders engagement in value-based actions (i.e., psychological inflexibility). Research suggests that psychological inflexibility exacerbates the negative effects of fear of self-compassion. The present study expanded on previous research by examining the relations among childhood maltreatment, fear of self-compassion, psychological inflexibility, and PTSD symptom severity in 288 college women. As expected, moderate to severe levels of childhood maltreatment were associated with greater fear of self-compassion, psychological inflexibility, and PTSD symptom severity compared to minimal or no childhood maltreatment. A mediation analysis showed that childhood maltreatment had a significant indirect effect on PTSD symptom severity via fear of self-compassion, although a conditional process analysis did not support psychological inflexibility as a moderator of this indirect effect. A post hoc multiple mediator analysis showed a significant indirect effect of childhood maltreatment on PTSD symptom severity via psychological inflexibility, but not fear of self-compassion. These findings highlight the importance of addressing fear of self-compassion and psychological inflexibility as barriers to treatment for female survivors of childhood maltreatment. PMID: 29144981 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

The views of adults with Huntington's disease on assisted dying: A qualitative exploration.

Related Articles The views of adults with Huntington's disease on assisted dying: A qualitative exploration. Palliat Med. 2017 Nov 01;:269216317741850 Authors: Regan L, Preston NJ, Eccles FJR, Simpson J Abstract BACKGROUND: Assisted dying is frequently debated publicly and research often includes the views of health professionals on this issue. However, the views of people with life-limiting conditions, for whom this issue is likely to have a different resonance, are less well represented. AIM: The purpose of this study was to explore the views of people who live with the inevitability of developing Huntington's disease, a genetically transmitted disease which significantly limits life, on assisted dying. DESIGN: Using thematic analysis methodology, individual semi-structured interviews were conducted. SETTING/PARTICIPANTS: Seven participants (five women and two men) who were gene positive for Huntington's disease took part in the study. RESULTS: Four themes were extracted: (1) autonomy and kindness in assisted dying: the importance of moral principles; (2) Huntington's disease threatens life and emphasises issues relating to death; (3) dilemmas in decision-making on assisted dying: "There are no winners" and (4) the absence of explicit discussion on dying and Huntington's disease: "Elephants in the room". CONCLUSIONS: Our findings suggest that talking to patients about assisted death may not cause harm and may even be invited by many patients with Huntington's disease. The perspectives of those who live with Huntington's disease, especially given its extended effects within families, add significant clinical and theoretical insights. PMID: 29139332 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]