Therapeutic Actions EXERCISE Strenuous

NCBI pubmed

Anomalous origin of coronary arteries from the "wrong" sinus in athletes: Diagnosis and management strategies.

Related Articles Anomalous origin of coronary arteries from the "wrong" sinus in athletes: Diagnosis and management strategies. Int J Cardiol. 2017 Nov 08;: Authors: Palmieri V, Gervasi S, Bianco M, Cogliani R, Poscolieri B, Cuccaro F, Marano R, Mazzari M, Basso C, Zeppilli P Abstract AIMS: Although anomalous origin of left (AOLCA) and right coronary artery (AORCA) from the wrong sinus may cause sudden death (SD) in athletes, early diagnosis and management of these anomalies are still challenging. We analysed clinical/instrumental profiles of athletes identified with AOLCA/AORCA focusing our attention on diagnosis, management and follow-up. METHODS AND RESULTS: We report 23 athletes (17 males, mean age 27±17yrs.), 6 with AOLCA and 17 with AORCA. Diagnosis was made by trans-thoracic echocardiography (TTE) in 21/23(91%). Symptoms were present only in 10(41%). Only 3 had an abnormal rest-ECG and 9(39%) an abnormal stress test ECG (3 ST-depression, 4 ventricular arrhythmias, 1 supraventricular arrhythmias, 1 rate-dependent left-bundle-branch-block). Anatomy of the anomalous coronary artery showed no significant correlation with clinical presentation, except for a tendency to higher occurrence of proximal hypoplasia in symptomatic athletes (83% vs 40%, p=0.09). All athletes were disqualified from competitive-sports and advised to avoid strenuous effort. Surgery was recommended to all athletes with AOLCA and 6 with AORCA, but only 6 underwent surgery. No major cardiac events or ischemic symptoms/signs occurred during a mean follow-up of 65±70months. CONCLUSIONS: Early diagnosis of AOLCA/AORCA in athletes is feasible by TTE. Typical symptoms/signs of myocardial ischemia are present only in one third of cases thus underlying the need of a high index of clinical suspicion to achieve the diagnosis. After exercise restriction, none had major cardiac events or ischemia symptoms/signs recurrence. There was no correlation between anatomical characteristics and clinical presentation with the possible exception of coronary hypoplasia. PMID: 29146296 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

Recovery of the cardiac autonomic nervous and vascular system after maximal cardiopulmonary exercise testing in recreational athletes.

Related Articles Recovery of the cardiac autonomic nervous and vascular system after maximal cardiopulmonary exercise testing in recreational athletes. Eur J Appl Physiol. 2017 Nov 15;: Authors: Weberruss H, Maucher J, Oberhoffer R, Müller J Abstract OBJECTIVE: The body's adaptation to physical exercise is modulated by sympathetic and parasympathetic (vagal) branches of the autonomic nervous system (ANS). Heart rate variability (HRV), the beat-to-beat variation of the heart, is a proxy measure for ANS activity, whereas blood pressure (BP) is an indicator for cardiovascular function. Impaired vagal activity and lower BP is already described after exercise. However, inconsistent results exist about how long vagal recovery takes and how long post-exercise hypotension persists. Therefore, the aim of this study was to assess HRV and BP 1 h after maximal cardiopulmonary exercise testing (CPET). PATIENTS AND METHODS: HRV (Polar RS800CX), peripheral and central BP (Mobil-O-Graph(®)) were prospectively studied in 107 healthy volunteers (47 female, median age 29.0 years) in supine position, before and 60 min after maximal CPET. RESULTS: One hour after terminating CPET measures of HRV were still impaired and post-exercise BP was significantly reduced suggesting an improved vascular function compared to pre levels. HRV parameters post-exercise were 34.7% (RMSSD), 67.2% (pNN50), 57.2% (HF), and 42.7% (LF) lower compared to pre-exercise levels (for all p < 0.001). Median reduction in BP was 5 mmHg for systolic BP (p < 0.001), and 4 mmHg for diastolic BP (p = 0.016) and central systolic post-exercise (p = 0.005). CONCLUSIONS: One hour after terminating strenuous exercise, autonomic nervous regulation seems to be postponed which is reflected in reduced HRV, whereas the early recovery of the vasculature, post-exercise hypotension, is still preserved over the recovery period of 1 h. PMID: 29143123 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

Acute Strenuous Exercise Induces an Imbalance on Histone H4 Acetylation/Histone Deacetylase 2 and Increases the Proinflammatory Profile of PBMC of Obese Individuals.

Related Articles Acute Strenuous Exercise Induces an Imbalance on Histone H4 Acetylation/Histone Deacetylase 2 and Increases the Proinflammatory Profile of PBMC of Obese Individuals. Oxid Med Cell Longev. 2017;2017:1530230 Authors: Dorneles GP, Boeira MCR, Schipper LL, Silva IRV, Elsner VR, Dal Lago P, Peres A, Romão PRT Abstract This study evaluated the response of global histone H4 acetylation (H4ac), histone deacetylase 2 (HDAC2) activity, as well as the production of proinflammatory cytokines and monocyte phenotypes of lean and obese males after exercise. Ten lean and ten obese sedentary men were submitted to one session of strenuous exercise, and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) were stimulated in vitro with lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Global H4ac levels, HDAC2 activity in PBMC, and IL-6, IL-8, and TNF-α production were analyzed. Monocyte phenotype was determined in accordance with the expression of CD14 and CD16. At rest, obese individuals presented higher frequency of proinflammatory CD14(+)CD16(+) monocytes. LPS induced a significant augment in global H4ac and in the production of IL-6, IL-8, and TNF-α mainly in obese individuals. After exercise, the increased production of IL-8 and TNF-α and peripheral frequency of CD14(+)CD16(+) were observed in both groups. In addition, exercise also induced a significant hyperacetylation of histone H4 and decreased HDAC2 activity in both nonstimulated and LPS-stimulated PBMC of obese individuals. Our data indicate that the obesity impacts on H4ac levels and that strenuous exercise leads to an enhanced chronic low-grade inflammation profile in obesity via an imbalance on H4ac/HDAC2. PMID: 29142617 [PubMed - in process]

Psychological and Psychophysiological Effects of Recuperative Music Postexercise.

Related Articles Psychological and Psychophysiological Effects of Recuperative Music Postexercise. Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2017 Nov 15;: Authors: Karageorghis CI, Bruce AC, Pottratz ST, Stevens RC, Bigliassi M, Hamer M Abstract PURPOSE: Few studies have examined the psychological and psychophysiological effects of recuperative music following exhaustive exercise. The main purpose of the present study was to examine the effects of two music conditions compared with a no-music control on psychological and psychophysiological recovery processes post-exercise. METHODS: A randomized, fully counterbalanced, crossover design was used. Core affect, salivary cortisol, heart rate, and blood pressure were measured before exhaustive exercise, immediately after, and in 10-, 20-, and 30-min intervals during passive recovery (21 women and 21 men; 20.9 ± 1.7 yr) over three separate trials (slow, sedative music; fast, stimulative music; no-music control). The exercise task entailed incremental cycle ergometry performed at 75 rpm with a 22.5 W.min increase in intensity at the end of each minute until exhaustion. Data were analyzed using mixed-model 3 (condition) × 4 (time) × 2 (gender) MANOVA/ANCOVA. RESULTS: The largest decline in affective arousal between active and passive recovery phases was evident in the slow, sedative condition (ηp = 0.50). Women had a more pronounced reduction in arousal than men in the slow, sedative music condition. Heart rate measures showed that fast, stimulative music inhibited the return of heart rate toward resting levels (ηp = 0.06). Similarly, salivary cortisol levels tended to be lower in response to slow, sedative music (ηp = 0.11). There was a main effect of condition for affective valence indicating that the slow, sedative condition elicited more positive affective responses than the control and fast, stimulative conditions (ηp = 0.12). CONCLUSIONS: The present findings support the notion that slow, sedative music can expedite the recovery process immediately after strenuous exercise. PMID: 29140897 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]