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A Multicenter, Retrospective Medical Record Review of X-Linked Myotubular Myopathy: The RECENSUS Study.

Related Articles A Multicenter, Retrospective Medical Record Review of X-Linked Myotubular Myopathy: The RECENSUS Study. Muscle Nerve. 2017 Nov 17;: Authors: Beggs AH, Byrne BJ, de Chastonay S, Haselkorn T, Hughes I, James ES, Kuntz NL, Simon J, Swanson LC, Yang ML, Yu ZF, Yum SW, Prasad S Abstract INTRODUCTION: X-linked myotubular myopathy (XLMTM), characterized by severe hypotonia, weakness, respiratory distress, and early mortality, is rare and natural history studies are few. METHODS: RECENSUS is a multicenter chart review of male XLMTM patients characterizing disease burden and unmet medical needs. Data were collected between September 2014 and June 2016. RESULTS: Analysis included 112 patients at six clinical sites. Most recent patient age recorded was ≤18 months for 40 patients and >18 months for 72 patients. Mean (SD) age at diagnosis was 3.7 (3.7) months and 54.3 (77.1) months, respectively. Mortality was 44% (64% ≤18 months; 32% >18 months). Premature delivery occurred in 34/110 (31%) births. Nearly all patients (90%) required respiratory support at birth. In the first year of life, patients underwent an average of 3.7 surgeries and spent 35% of the year in the hospital. DISCUSSION: XLMTM is associated with high mortality, disease burden, and healthcare utilization. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. PMID: 29149770 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

Bisphenol A distribution in serum, urine, placenta, breast milk, and umbilical cord serum in a birth panel of mother-neonate pairs.

Related Articles Bisphenol A distribution in serum, urine, placenta, breast milk, and umbilical cord serum in a birth panel of mother-neonate pairs. Sci Total Environ. 2017 Nov 13;: Authors: Lee J, Choi K, Park J, Moon HB, Choi G, Lee JJ, Suh E, Kim HJ, Eun SH, Kim GH, Cho GJ, Kim SK, Kim S, Kim SY, Kim S, Eom S, Choi S, Kim YD, Kim S Abstract Bisphenol A (BPA) exposure during the perinatal and postnatal periods increases the susceptibility to disease over the life cycle. However, information on the BPA delivered to fetuses or infants via the placenta and breastfeeding is limited. We determined the BPA exposure levels in various bodily fluids and tissues of pregnant women and described fetus and infant exposures to BPA based on associations and BPA ratios in mother-neonate paired samples. Maternal serum, urine, placenta, breast milk, cord serum, and neonatal urine samples were collected from 318 mother-neonate pairs at six university hospitals in Korea. BPA levels were detected using liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry. The ratios of the BPA levels in the other sample types to the levels in maternal serum were calculated. BPA was detected in 79.5-100% of the maternal and fetal samples. The median BPA concentration in the samples decreased in the order of neonatal urine (4.75ng/mL), maternal urine (2.86ng/mL), cord serum (1.71ng/mL), maternal serum (1.56ng/mL), breast milk (0.74ng/mL), and the placenta (0.53ng/g). We estimated the ratios of BPA levels in the other sample types to those in maternal serum. The median (95th percentile) cord serum-to-maternal serum ratio was 1.12 (15.2) for 160 mother-fetal pairs, in which BPA was detected in both samples. The placenta-, maternal urine-, neonatal urine-, and breast milk-to-maternal serum ratios were 0.28 (5.31), 1.79 (29.9), 1.98 (28.2), and 0.51 (10.5), respectively. In addition, the median (95th percentile) cord serum-to-placenta ratio was 4.03 (45.8), and the neonatal urine-to-cord serum ratio was 1.95 (25.6). The 95th percentile values were 14-20-fold greater than the medians. Urine contained the highest BPA concentrations, followed by serum, breast milk, and the placenta. The variations of BPA ratio show individual differences in the amounts of BPA delivered from mother to fetus. PMID: 29146078 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

Making gametes from alternate sources of stem cells: past, present and future.

Related Articles Making gametes from alternate sources of stem cells: past, present and future. Reprod Biol Endocrinol. 2017 Nov 16;15(1):89 Authors: Bhartiya D, Anand S, Patel H, Parte S Abstract Infertile couples including cancer survivors stand to benefit from gametes differentiated from embryonic or induced pluripotent stem (ES/iPS) cells. It remains challenging to convert human ES/iPS cells into primordial germ-like cells (PGCLCs) en route to obtaining gametes. Considerable success was achieved in 2016 to obtain fertile offspring starting with mouse ES/iPS cells, however the specification of human ES/iPS cells into PGCLCs in vitro is still not achieved. Human ES cells will not yield patient-specific gametes unless and until hES cells are derived by somatic cell nuclear transfer (therapeutic cloning) whereas iPS cells retain the residual epigenetic memory of the somatic cells from which they are derived and also harbor genomic and mitochondrial DNA mutations. Thus, they may not be ideal starting material to produce autologus gametes, especially for aged couples. Pluripotent, very small embryonic-like stem cells (VSELs) have been reported in adult tissues including gonads, are relatively quiescent in nature, survive oncotherapy and can be detected in aged, non-functional gonads. Being developmentally equivalent to PGCs (natural precursors to gametes), VSELs spontaneously differentiate into gametes in vitro. It is also being understood that gonadal stem cells niche is compromised by oncotherapy and with age. Improving the gonadal somatic niche could regenerate non-functional gonads from endogenous VSELs to restore fertility. Niche cells (Sertoli/mesenchymal cells) can be directly transplanted and restore gonadal function by providing paracrine support to endogenous VSELs. This strategy has been successful in several mice studies already and resulted in live birth in a woman with pre-mature ovarian failure. PMID: 29145898 [PubMed - in process]

Primary myelofibrosis and pregnancy outcomes after low molecular-weight heparin administration: A case report and literature review.

Related Articles Primary myelofibrosis and pregnancy outcomes after low molecular-weight heparin administration: A case report and literature review. Medicine (Baltimore). 2017 Nov;96(46):e8735 Authors: Bohîlţea RE, Cîrstoiu MM, Ionescu CA, Niculescu-Mizil E, Vlădăreanu AM, Voican I, Dimitriu M, Turcan N Abstract RATIONALE: Primary myelofibrosis is encountered with the myeloproliferative diseases and is the least prevalent among women of childbearing age. The prognosis is guided by pancytopenia, leukemic transformation and thrombosis which are the dominant complications. PATIENT CONCERNS: Data regarding protocol management during pregnancy in the context of myelofibrosis are insufficient. Fewer than ten cases have been described until now and half of this cases have resulted in fetal death due to placental infarction during the second and third trimesters. DIAGNOSES: We present the case of a 34-year-old pregnant woman diagnosed with Jak 2- negative primary myelofibrosis. Personal history did not include miscarriage or stillbirth. INTERVENTIONS: The patient was previously treated with anagrelide hydrochloride, which was interrupted at 6 weeks of gestation when the pregnancy was confirmed. It was replaced with Interferon-a 3 MU/day. Because of severe thrombocytosis, administration of aspirin 150 mg/day was recommended. OUTCOMES: The pregnancy was uneventful. The patient was hospitalized at 33 weeks of gestation because of moderate vaginal bleeding and high risk of preterm birth. After a specialized hematological investigation, the treatment with aspirin was replaced with low-molecular-weight heparin 0.6 ml per day. This combined treatment assisted in the natural tendency to lower platelet counts during pregnancy and resulted in stabilization of the hematological status. At 38 weeks of gestation the patient delivered a healthy baby boy via cesarean. He weight 2850 grams and his Apgar score was 9. Anticoagulant and interferon treatments were continued post-partum under hematologist surveillance. LESSONS: This case was rare and complex. Because it was related to pregnancy it required continuos collaboration and supervision between obstetrician and hematologist. PMID: 29145319 [PubMed - in process]