Cybermedlife - Therapeutic Actions Ayurvedic medicine


The Effect of Coconut Oil pulling on Streptococcus mutans Count in Saliva in Comparison with Chlorhexidine Mouthwash.

Abstract Title: The Effect of Coconut Oil pulling on Streptococcus mutans Count in Saliva in Comparison with Chlorhexidine Mouthwash. Abstract Source: J Contemp Dent Pract. 2016 ;17(1):38-41. Epub 2016 Jan 1. PMID: 27084861 Abstract Author(s): Mamta Kaushik, Pallavi Reddy, Roshni Sharma, Pooja Udameshi, Neha Mehra, Aditya Marwaha Article Affiliation: Mamta Kaushik Abstract: OBJECTIVES: Oil pulling is an age-old practice that has gained modern popularity in promoting oral and systemic health. The scientific verification for this practice is insufficient. Thus, this study evaluated the effect of coconut oil pulling on the count of Streptococcus mutans in saliva and to compare its efficacy with that of Chlorhexidine mouthwash: in vivo. The null hypothesis was that coconut oil pulling has no effect on the bacterial count in saliva. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A randomized controlled study was planned and 60 subjects were selected. The subjects were divided into three groups, Group A: STUDY GROUP: Oil pulling, Group B: STUDY GROUP: Chlorhexidine, and Group C: CONTROL GROUP: Distilled water. Group A subjects rinsed mouth with 10 ml of coconut oil for 10 minutes. Group B subjects rinsed mouth with 5 ml Chlorhexidine mouthwash for 1 minute and Group C with 5 ml distilled water for 1 minute in the morning before brushing. Saliva samples were collected and cultured on 1st day and after 2 weeks from all subjects. Colonies were counted to compare the efficacy of coconut oil and Chlorhexidine with distilled water. RESULTS: Statistically significant reduction in S. mutans count was seen in both the coconut oil pulling and Chlorhexidine group. CONCLUSION: Oil pulling can be explored as a safe and effective alternative to Chlorhexidine. CLINICAL SIGNIFICANCE: Edible oil-pulling therapy is natural, safe and has no side effects. Hence, it can be considered as a preventive therapy at home to maintain oral hygiene. Article Published Date : Dec 31, 2015

Effects of Ayurvedic Oil-Dripping Treatment with Sesame Oil vs. with Warm Water on Sleep: A Randomized Single-Blinded Crossover Pilot Study.

Abstract Title: Effects of Ayurvedic Oil-Dripping Treatment with Sesame Oil vs. with Warm Water on Sleep: A Randomized Single-Blinded Crossover Pilot Study. Abstract Source: J Altern Complement Med. 2016 Jan ;22(1):52-8. Epub 2015 Dec 15. PMID: 26669255 Abstract Author(s): Akiko Tokinobu, Takashi Yorifuji, Toshihide Tsuda, Hiroyuki Doi Article Affiliation: Akiko Tokinobu Abstract: OBJECTIVES: Ayurvedic oil-dripping treatment (Shirodhara) is often used for treating sleep problems. However, few properly designed studies have been conducted, and the quantitative effect of Shirodhara is unclear. This study sought to quantitatively evaluate the effect of sesame oil Shirodhara (SOS) against warm water Shirodhara (WWS) on improving sleep quality and quality of life (QOL) among persons reporting sleep problems. METHODS: This randomized, single-blinded, crossover study recruited 20 participants. Each participant received seven 30-minute sessions within 2 weeks with either liquid. The washout period was at least 2 months. The Shirodhara procedure was conducted by a robotic oil-drip system. The outcomes were assessed by the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) for sleep quality, Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS) for daytime sleepiness, World Health Organization Quality of Life 26 (WHO-QOL26) for QOL, and a sleep monitor instrument for objective sleep measures. Changes between baseline and follow-up periods were compared between the two types of Shirodhara. Analysis was performed with generalized estimating equations. RESULTS: Of 20 participants, 15 completed the study. SOS improved sleep quality, as measured by PSQI. The SOS score was 1.83 points lower (95% confidence interval [CI], -3.37 to -0.30) at 2-week follow-up and 1.73 points lower (95% CI, -3.84 to 0.38) than WWS at 6-week follow-up. Although marginally significant, SOS also improved QOL by 0.22 points at 2-week follow-up and 0.19 points at 6-week follow-up compared with WWS. After SOS, no beneficial effects were observed on daytime sleepiness or objective sleep measures. CONCLUSIONS: This pilot study demonstrated that SOS may be a safe potential treatment to improve sleep quality and QOL in persons with sleep problems. Article Published Date : Dec 31, 2015

Effect of coconut oil in plaque related gingivitis - A preliminary report.

Abstract Title: Effect of coconut oil in plaque related gingivitis - A preliminary report. Abstract Source: Niger Med J. 2015 Mar-Apr;56(2):143-7. PMID: 25838632 Abstract Author(s): Faizal C Peedikayil, Prathima Sreenivasan, Arun Narayanan Article Affiliation: Faizal C Peedikayil Abstract: BACKGROUND: Oil pulling or oil swishing therapy is a traditional procedure in which the practitioners rinse or swish oil in their mouth. It is supposed to cure oral and systemic diseases but the evidence is minimal. Oil pulling with sesame oil and sunflower oil was found to reduce plaque related gingivitis. Coconut oil is an easily available edible oil. It is unique because it contains predominantly medium chain fatty acids of which 45-50 percent is lauric acid. Lauric acid has proven anti inflammatory and antimicrobial effects. No studies have been done on the benefits of oil pulling using coconut oil to date. So a pilot study was planned to assess the effect of coconut oil pulling on plaque induced gingivitis. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The aim of the study was to evaluate the effect of coconut oil pulling/oil swishing on plaque formation and plaque induced gingivitis. A prospective interventional study was carried out. 60 age matched adolescent boys and girls in the age-group of 16-18 years with plaque induced gingivitis were included in the study and oil pulling was included in their oral hygiene routine. The study period was 30 days. Plaque and gingival indices of the subjects were assessed at baseline days 1,7,15 and 30. The data was analyzed using paired t test. RESULTS: A statistically significant decrease in the plaque and gingival indices was noticed from day 7 and the scores continued to decrease during the period of study. CONCLUSION: Oil pulling using coconut oil could be an effective adjuvant procedure in decreasing plaque formation and plaque induced gingivitis. Article Published Date : Feb 28, 2015

Yogic breathing and Ayurveda in aphasia: a case study.

Abstract Title: Yogic breathing and Ayurveda in aphasia: a case study. Abstract Source: Top Stroke Rehabil. 2014 May-Jun;21(3):272-9. PMID: 24985394 Abstract Author(s): Bijoyaa Mohapatra, Rebecca Shisler Marshall, Jacqueline Laures-Gore Article Affiliation: Bijoyaa Mohapatra Abstract: PURPOSE: We present a case study of a woman who used yogic breathing as Ayurvedic medicine in her recovery from poststroke aphasia. Ayurvedic medicine is one of the most ancient medicines of the world, but it is not widely used for aphasia rehabilitation in many Western countries. The description of this case aims to further the understanding of the benefits that this type of medicine may provide to poststroke patients living with aphasia. METHOD: After her stroke, the patient received brief conventional language therapy for her aphasia. At 5 weeks post stroke, she received no further conventional rehabilitation; instead, she consulted with a Vedic priest. She followed a regimen of different body manipulations, yogic breathing techniques, and ingestion of coconut oil. Cognitive and language testing was performed throughout a 3-month period while she was involved in this therapy. RESULTS: Overall, improvement was noted in language, visual attention, and some mood measures. CONCLUSION: Although case studies lead to limited conclusions, changes were observed for this individual using Ayurvedic medicine. Given the changes in language and some aspects of cognition seen in this patient, further exploration of the effectiveness of yogic breathing and Ayurvedic medicine in the treatment of poststroke aphasia is warranted. Article Published Date : Apr 30, 2014

Clinical efficacy of Manasamitra Vataka (an Ayurveda medication) on generalized anxiety disorder with comorbid generalized social phobia: a randomized controlled study.

Abstract Title: Clinical efficacy of Manasamitra Vataka (an Ayurveda medication) on generalized anxiety disorder with comorbid generalized social phobia: a randomized controlled study. Abstract Source: J Altern Complement Med. 2012 Jun ;18(6):612-21. PMID: 22784349 Abstract Author(s): Basavaraj R Tubaki, Channapatna R Chandrashekar, Deverakonda Sudhakar, Talakad N Sathya Prabha, Gandhidas S Lavekar, Bindu M Kutty Article Affiliation: Department of Neurophysiology, National Institute of Mental Health and Neurosciences (NIMHANS Deemed University), Bangalore, India. Abstract: BACKGROUND: Studies on alternative medicines for generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) are few. Manasamitra Vataka (an Ayurveda preparation) is explored for its efficacy in patients with GAD with comorbid generalized social phobia. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Seventy-two (72) patients with GAD with comorbid social phobia meeting DSM IV TR criteria, and who were between the ages of 20 and 55 of either sex, participated in the study. They were randomly divided into three treatment groups: Group 1 (n=24) and Group II (n=24) received Manasamitra Vataka tablets (100 mg twice daily for 30 days). Group II, in addition to Manasamitra Vataka, underwent Shirodhara (therapy involving dripping of medicated oil [Brahmi tail] over the forehead) treatment for the first 7 days. Group III (n=24) received clonazepam 0.75 mg daily in divided dose for 30 days. The assessment of the study was done using the Hamilton Anxiety Rating Scale, Beck Anxiety Inventory, Beck Depression Inventory, Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS), World Health Organization Quality of Life BREF, and Clinical Global Impression scales (Improvement and Efficacy). RESULTS: Patients from all the groups showed significant reduction in clinical parameters evaluated. However, improvement in ESS was observed only in Group II. The treatment outcome was comparable between the three groups. CONCLUSIONS: This is the first study conducted on the efficacy of Manasamitra Vataka in anxiety disorders. The results suggest that Manasamitra Vataka is effective in the management GAD with comorbid generalized social phobia. Add-on effect of Shirodhara reduced the daytime sleepiness. Further studies on Manasamitra Vataka need to be carried out to judge its potential as a first-line treatment modality. Article Published Date : May 31, 2012
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Therapeutic Actions Ayurvedic Medicine

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Effect of Swarna Jibanti (Coelogyne cristata Lindley) in alleviation of chronic fatigue syndrome in aged Wistar rats.

Related Articles Effect of Swarna Jibanti (Coelogyne cristata Lindley) in alleviation of chronic fatigue syndrome in aged Wistar rats. J Ayurveda Integr Med. 2017 Nov 01;: Authors: Mitra A, Sur TK, Upadhyay S, Bhattacharyya D, Hazra J Abstract BACKGROUND: Swarna Jibanti scientifically known as Coelogyne cristata Lindley (Orchidaceae), an orchid mentioned in Ayurvedic medicine is used to promote healthy life span. OBJECTIVE: The present work was planned to study the efficacy of hydro-alcoholic extract of pseudobulbs of C.cristata (CCE) to assess its role on chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) induced behavioural and biochemical changes in aged Wistar rats compared to Panax ginseng (PG), a prototype anti-stress agent. MATERIALS AND METHODS: CFS was induced by forced swimming for consecutive 21 days for fixed duration (15 min sessions). The criteria of CFS due to fatigue were counted using locomotor activity, depression and anxiety through automated photactometer, immobility time and plus maze activity respectively. Acute toxicity study of CCE (upto 2 g/kg, Limit test) was also performed. For CFS, animals were divided into five groups, naive control, control, CCE treated (25 mg/kg b.w., 250 mg/kg b.w.) and standard PG treated (100 mg/kg b.w.) groups. All drugs were given orally for consecutive 21 days along with CFS. After assessing behavioural parameters, all animals were sacrificed at day 21 and in vivo antioxidant potential of CCE was determined by lipid peroxides, nitrite, catalase (CAT) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) in brain tissue. RESULTS: CCE was found to be non-toxic. CCE treated aged rats significantly improved (p < 0.001) the spontaneous locomotor movement with respect to control rats, while, decreased the mobility period or depression score. In CFS, CCE also enhanced the time spent (p < 0.001) in open arms while reducing the time spent in closed arm as compared to CFS control, indicating lowering anxiety score. Moreover, marked diminution in lipid peroxidation, nitrite and SOD level was exhibited after CCE treatment and significantly enhanced catalase level significantly (p < 0.01) with respect to CFS control. PG also showed similar actions. CONCLUSION: The results confirmed the potential therapeutic actions of CCE against experimentally induced CFS in aged rats that might be due to its CNS mediatory antioxidant properties. PMID: 29102461 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]