Cybermedlife - Therapeutic Actions Chiropractic Treatment Cervical Manipulation


Subclinical neck pain and the effects of cervical manipulation on elbow joint position sense.

Abstract Title: Subclinical neck pain and the effects of cervical manipulation on elbow joint position sense. Abstract Source: J Manipulative Physiol Ther. 2011 Feb ;34(2):88-97. PMID: 21334540 Abstract Author(s): Heidi Haavik, Bernadette Murphy Article Affiliation: New Zealand College of Chiropractic, Auckland, New Zealand. This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. Abstract: OBJECTIVE: The objectives of this study were to investigate whether elbow joint position sense (JPS) accuracy differs between participants with a history of subclinical neck pain (SCNP) and those with no neck complaints and to determine whether adjusting dysfunctional cervical segments in the SCNP group improves their JPS accuracy. METHOD: Twenty-five SCNP participants and 18 control participants took part in this pre-post experimental study. Elbow JPS was measured using an electrogoniometer (MLTS700, ADInstruments, New Zealand). Participants reproduced a previously presented angle of the elbow joint with their neck in 4 positions: neutral, flexion, rotation, and combined flexion/rotation. The experimental intervention was high-velocity, low-amplitude cervical adjustments, and the control intervention was a 5-minute rest period. Group JPS data were compared, and it was assessed pre and post interventions using 3 parameters: absolute, constant, and variable errors. RESULTS: At baseline, the control group was significantly better at reproducing the elbow target angle. The SCNP group's absolute error significantly improved after the cervical adjustments when the participants' heads were in the neutral and left-rotation positions. They displayed a significant overall decrease in variable error after the cervical adjustments. The control group participants' JPS accuracy was worse after the control intervention, with a significant overall effect in absolute and variable errors. No other significant effects were detected. CONCLUSION: These results suggest that asymptomatic people with a history of SCNP have reduced elbow JPS accuracy compared to those with no history of any neck complaints. Furthermore, the results suggest that adjusting dysfunctional cervical segments in people with SCNP can improve their upper limb JPS accuracy. Article Published Date : Feb 01, 2011
Therapeutic Actions Chiropractic Treatment Cervical Manipulation

NCBI pubmed

What do patients value about spinal manipulation and home exercise for back-related leg pain? A qualitative study within a controlled clinical trial.

Related Articles What do patients value about spinal manipulation and home exercise for back-related leg pain? A qualitative study within a controlled clinical trial. Man Ther. 2016 Dec;26:183-191 Authors: Maiers M, Hondras MA, Salsbury SA, Bronfort G, Evans R Abstract BACKGROUND: Patient perceptions may influence the effectiveness and utilization of healthcare interventions, particularly for complex health conditions such as sciatica or back-related leg pain (BRLP). OBJECTIVES: To explore BRLP patients' perceptions of spinal manipulative therapy (SMT) and home exercise with advice (HEA). DESIGN: Qualitative study in a controlled clinical trial. METHOD: Semi-structured interviews conducted after 12 weeks of treatment asked participants about satisfaction with care and whether treatment was worthwhile. An interdisciplinary research team conducted content analysis using qualitative data analysis software to identify and summarize themes. RESULTS: Of 192 trial participants, 174 (91%) completed interviews (66% female, age 57.0 ± 11.5 years). Participants identified interactions with providers and staff, perceived treatment effects, and information as key contributors to both their satisfaction and the worthwhile nature of treatment. HEA was liked for its convenience and ability to foster an exercise habit. SMT was liked for specific aspects of the modality (e.g. manipulation, stretching) and provider competency. Most participants reported no dislikes for SMT or HEA, but some noted the dose/time commitment for SMT and discipline of HEA as least liked aspects of the interventions. CONCLUSIONS: The quality of patient-provider interactions, perceived treatment effects, and information sharing influenced BRLP patients' satisfaction with care. Qualitative research describing patients' preferences can facilitate translation of study findings into practice and allow clinicians to tailor treatments to facilitate compliance and satisfaction with care. PMID: 27705840 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]