Therapeutic Actions EXERCISE Feldenkrais Method

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The Feldenkrais Method(®) can enhance cognitive function in independent living older adults: A case-series.

Related Articles The Feldenkrais Method(®) can enhance cognitive function in independent living older adults: A case-series. J Bodyw Mov Ther. 2016 Jul;20(3):512-7 Authors: Ullmann G, Williams HG Abstract Poor cognitive health a major concern of aging individuals, can compromise independent living. More than 16 million people in the United States are affected by cognitive impairment. We have studied the effects of the Feldenkrais Method(®) on cognitive function. In this case series with three participants cognitive function was assessed with the Trail Making Test A and B at baseline and after the Feldenkrais intervention. All participants improved performance on Trail Making Test A and B after completing the Feldenkrais intervention indicating that Feldenkrais lessons may offset age-related decline in cognitive function. The results of this case series warrant larger scale studies on cognitive outcomes of Feldenkrais interventions in clinical and non-clinical populations. PMID: 27634072 [PubMed - in process]

Attentional Focus in Motor Learning, the Feldenkrais Method, and Mindful Movement.

Related Articles Attentional Focus in Motor Learning, the Feldenkrais Method, and Mindful Movement. Percept Mot Skills. 2016 Aug;123(1):258-76 Authors: Mattes J Abstract The present paper discusses attentional focus in motor learning and performance from the point of view of mindful movement practices, taking as a starting point the Feldenkrais method. It is argued that earlier criticism of the Feldenkrais method (and thereby implicitly of mindful movement practices more generally) because of allegedly inappropriate attentional focus turns out to be unfounded in light of recent developments in the study of motor learning and performance. Conversely, the examples of the Feldenkrais method and Ki-Aikido are used to illustrate how both Western and Eastern (martial arts derived) mindful movement practices might benefit sports psychology. PMID: 27502242 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Case Report: Outcomes of Feldenkrais Movements on Self-reported Cognitive Decline in Older Adults.

Related Articles Case Report: Outcomes of Feldenkrais Movements on Self-reported Cognitive Decline in Older Adults. Adv Mind Body Med. 2016;30(2):19-23 Authors: Ullmann G Abstract UNLABELLED: Context • A lack of cognitive health can limit a person's well-being and may compromise independent living. The potential for cognitive decline is a major concern for aging individuals. Regular physical activity has been shown to improve cognitive processes. However, functional limitations frequently prevent older adults from participating in conventional exercise programs. Given the gentle nature of mind-body exercises, interventions such as the Feldenkrais may provide an alternative. Objective • The study intended to investigate whether Feldenkrais lessons can offset cognitive decline among older adults. DESIGN: The study was a case series with 2 participants. Setting • The study took place in the wellness center of a retirement community. Participants • Participants were 2 female residents in the community, with self-reported cognitive challenges. Intervention • The Feldenkrais method awareness through movement (ATM) was used. The lessons were based on common Feldenkrais themes, such as the relationship between eye organization and body movement, coordination of muscles, breathing, and an exploration of the participants' habits. Outcome Measures • The Trail Making Test A (TMT-A) and Trail Making Tests B (TMT-B) were used to measure cognitive function at baseline and after the Feldenkrais intervention. Results • Both participants improved their performance on the TMT-A and TMT-B after completing the Feldenkrais intervention. Neither of the 2 participants reported any adverse events related to the lessons. Conclusion • The beneficial results warrant further research into the efficacy of Feldenkrais as complementary, alternative therapy for preserving cognitive function on a larger scale and in populations with diagnosed cognitive impairments. PMID: 27250213 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Improved interoceptive awareness in chronic low back pain: a comparison of Back school versus Feldenkrais method.

Related Articles Improved interoceptive awareness in chronic low back pain: a comparison of Back school versus Feldenkrais method. Disabil Rehabil. 2017 May;39(10):994-1001 Authors: Paolucci T, Zangrando F, Iosa M, De Angelis S, Marzoli C, Piccinini G, Saraceni VM Abstract PURPOSE: To determine the efficacy of the Feldenkrais method for relieving pain in patients with chronic low back pain (CLBP) and the improvement of interoceptive awareness. METHOD: This study was designed as a single-blind randomized controlled trial. Fifty-three patients with a diagnosis of CLBP for at least 3 months were randomly allocated to the Feldenkrais (mean age 61.21 ± 11.53 years) or Back School group (mean age 60.70 ± 11.72 years). Pain was assessed using the visual analog scale (VAS) and McGill Pain Questionnaire (MPQ), disability was evaluated with the Waddel Disability Index, quality of life was measured with the Short Form-36 Health Survey (SF-36), and mind-body interactions were studied using the Multidimensional Assessment of Interoceptive Awareness Questionnaire (MAIA). Data were collected at baseline, at the end of treatment, and at the 3-month follow-up. RESULTS: The two groups were matched at baseline for all the computed parameters. At the end of treatment (Tend), there were no significant differences between groups regarding chronic pain reduction (p = 0.290); VAS and MAIA-N sub scores correlated at Tend (R = 0.296, p = 0.037). By the Friedman analysis, both groups experienced significant changes in pain (p < 0.001) and disability (p < 0.001) along the investigated period. CONCLUSIONS: The Feldenkrais method has comparable efficacy as Back School in CLBP. Implications for rehabilitation The Feldenkrais method is a mind-body therapy that is based on awareness through movement lessons, which are verbally guided explorations of movement that are conducted by a physiotherapist who is experienced and trained in this method. It aims to increase self-awareness, expand a person's repertoire of movements, and to promote increased functioning in contexts in which the entire body cooperates in the execution of movements. Interoceptive awareness, which improves with rehabilitation, has a complex function in the perception of chronic pain and should be investigated further in future research. The efficacy of the Feldenkrais method is comparable with that of BS for nonspecific chronic low back pain. The physician can recommend a body-mind rehabilitation approach, such as the Feldenkrais method, or an educational and rehabilitation program, such as BS, to the patient, based on his individual needs. The 2 rehabilitation approaches are equally as effective in improving interoceptive awareness. PMID: 27215948 [PubMed - in process]

Feldenkrais method-based exercise improves quality of life in individuals with Parkinson's disease: a controlled, randomized clinical trial.

Related Articles Feldenkrais method-based exercise improves quality of life in individuals with Parkinson's disease: a controlled, randomized clinical trial. Altern Ther Health Med. 2015 Jan-Feb;21(1):8-14 Authors: Teixeira-Machado L, Araújo FM, Cunha FA, Menezes M, Menezes T, Melo DeSantana J Abstract CONTEXT: Longevity results in changes to patterns of health, with an increased prevalence of chronic diseases. Parkinson's disease (PD) is described as a progressive neurodegenerative disease related to age that influences quality of life (QoL) and leads to depression. OBJECTIVE: The study intended to assess changes in QoL and depression in older adults with PD through use of Feldenkrais method-based exercise. DESIGN: The study was a controlled, blinded, and randomized clinical trial. SETTING: The study occurred at the University Hospital of the Federal University of Sergipe in Aracaju, Sergipe, Brazil. PARTICIPANTS: Participants were 30 patients, aged between 50 and 70 y, with idiopathic PD, who signed an informed consent form and were randomly assigned to 2 groups: treatment and control. INTERVENTION: The treatment group underwent 50 sessions of an exercise program based on the Feldenkrais method. The control group received educational lectures during this period. The treatment group's 50 sessions, given 2 ×/wk on alternate days and lasting 60 min, were conducted in an appropriate room at the hospital. OUTCOME MEASURES: Two surveys, the Parkinson's Disease Quality of Life (PDQL) questionnaire and the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), were administered before and after the sessions for both groups. RESULTS: After the exercises based on the Feldenkrais method, the treated group showed improvement in QoL scores (P = .004) as well as a reduction in the level of depression (P = .05) compared with the control group. CONCLUSION: The findings in the current study indicate that it is likely that the practice of a program based on the Feldenkrais method can contribute greatly to the QoL of patients with PD, suggesting the importance of interventions that promote wellness for this population. PMID: 25599428 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

A novel sensorimotor movement and walking intervention to improve balance and gait in women.

Related Articles A novel sensorimotor movement and walking intervention to improve balance and gait in women. Complement Ther Clin Pract. 2014 Nov;20(4):311-6 Authors: Cook SB, LaRoche DP, Swartz EE, Hammond PR, King MA Abstract PURPOSE: This study evaluated the effectiveness of a 5-day mind-body exercise (MBE) program on measures of quality of life, balance, balance confidence, mobility and gait in community-dwelling women. METHODS: The MBE program was a 5-day retreat where multiple sessions of Feldenkrais(®)-based sensorimotor movement training and walking were performed daily. Forty-six women aged 40-80 years old participated in either the MBE program or maintained normal daily activity. Two-footed eyes-closed balance, gait characteristics, mobility via the Timed Up and Go test, balance confidence and quality of life were assessed before and after the intervention. RESULTS: Women in the MBE group experienced improvements in mobility (6%; p = 0.01), stride length (3%; p = 0.008), single limb support time (1.3%; 0.006), balance confidence (5.2%; p < 0.001) and quality of life (p < 0.05) while the control group did not change. CONCLUSION: This short-term intensive program may be beneficial to women at risk of mobility limitations. PMID: 25456024 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Preventing Loss of Independence through Exercise (PLIÉ): qualitative analysis of a clinical trial in older adults with dementia.

Related Articles Preventing Loss of Independence through Exercise (PLIÉ): qualitative analysis of a clinical trial in older adults with dementia. Aging Ment Health. 2015;19(4):353-62 Authors: Wu E, Barnes DE, Ackerman SL, Lee J, Chesney M, Mehling WE Abstract OBJECTIVES: Preventing Loss of Independence through Exercise (PLIÉ) is a novel, integrative exercise program for individuals with dementia that combines elements of different conventional and complementary exercise modalities (e.g. tai-chi, yoga, Feldenkrais, and dance movement therapy) and focuses on training procedural memory for basic functional movements (e.g., sit-to-stand) while increasing mindful body awareness and facilitating social connection. This study presents analyses of qualitative data collected during a 36-week cross-over pilot clinical trial in 11 individuals. METHODS: Qualitative data included exercise instructors' written notes, which were prepared after each class and also following biweekly telephone calls with caregivers and monthly home visits; three video-recorded classes; and written summaries prepared by research assistants following pre- and post-intervention quantitative assessments. Data were extracted for each study participant and placed onto a timeline for month of observation. Data were coded and analyzed to identify themes that were confirmed and refined through an iterative, collaborative process by the entire team including a qualitative researcher (SA) and the exercise instructors. RESULTS: Three overarching themes emerged: (1) Functional changes included increasing body awareness, movement memory and functional skill. (2) Emotional changes included greater acceptance of resting, sharing of personal stories and feelings, and positive attitude toward exercise. (3) Social changes included more coherent social interactions and making friends. CONCLUSIONS: These qualitative results suggest that the PLIÉ program may be associated with beneficial functional, emotional, and social changes for individuals with mild to moderate dementia. Further study of the PLIÉ program in individuals with dementia is warranted. PMID: 25022459 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Effects of Feldenkrais method on chronic neck/scapular pain in people with visual impairment: a randomized controlled trial with one-year follow-up.

Related Articles Effects of Feldenkrais method on chronic neck/scapular pain in people with visual impairment: a randomized controlled trial with one-year follow-up. Arch Phys Med Rehabil. 2014 Sep;95(9):1656-61 Authors: Lundqvist LO, Zetterlund C, Richter HO Abstract OBJECTIVE: To determine whether the Feldenkrais method is an effective intervention for chronic neck/scapular pain in patients with visual impairment. DESIGN: Randomized controlled trial with an untreated control group. SETTING: Low vision center. PARTICIPANTS: Patients (N=61) with visual impairment (mean, 53.3 y) and nonspecific chronic (mean, 23.8 y) neck/scapular pain. INTERVENTIONS: Participants were randomly assigned to the Feldenkrais method group (n=30) or untreated control group (n=31). Patients in the treatment group underwent one 2-hour Feldenkrais method session per week for 12 consecutive weeks. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Blind assessment of perceived pain (visual analog scale [VAS]) during physical therapist palpation of the left and right occipital, upper trapezius, and levator scapulae muscle areas; self-assessed degree of pain on the Visual, Musculoskeletal, and Balance Complaints questionnaire; and the Medical Outcomes Study 36-Item Short-Form Health Survey bodily pain scale. RESULTS: Patients undergoing Feldenkrais method reported significantly less pain than the controls according to the VAS and Visual, Musculoskeletal, and Balance Complaints questionnaire ratings at posttreatment follow-up and 1-year follow-up. There were no significant differences regarding the Medical Outcomes Study 36-Item Short-Form Health Survey bodily pain scale ratings. CONCLUSIONS: Feldenkrais method is an effective intervention for chronic neck/scapular pain in patients with visual impairment. PMID: 24907640 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Can Feldenkrais exercises ameliorate subclinical depressive symptoms in older adults? A pilot study.

Related Articles Can Feldenkrais exercises ameliorate subclinical depressive symptoms in older adults? A pilot study. J S C Med Assoc. 2011;107 Suppl:7-10 Authors: Ullmann G, Williams HG PMID: 22057592 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Feldenkrais® therapy as group treatment for chronic pain--a qualitative evaluation.

Related Articles Feldenkrais® therapy as group treatment for chronic pain--a qualitative evaluation. J Bodyw Mov Ther. 2011 Apr;15(2):153-61 Authors: Ohman A, Aström L, Malmgren-Olsson EB Abstract PURPOSE: This qualitative study describes and analyses the experiences and self-reported effects of those participating in a Feldenkrais group intervention. METHOD: Fourteen women with non-specific neck and shoulder pain participated in a group treatment design using the Feldenkrais Awareness Through Movement (ATM) method. Data were collected in two ways: diary notes directly after the sessions and thematic interviews 4-6 months after the intervention. Data were analysed with a Grounded Theory approach. RESULTS: One core category and two sub-categories emerged. The core category "Feldenkrais is wholesome, but difficult" represents the participants' major opinions about the group intervention. The sub-categories "More erect without effort", and "Extended space for myself", represent participants' descriptions of effects of the movement therapy. The women described changes in posture and balance, a feeling of release and increased self-confidence. Some ambivalence about the method was expressed, especially regarding the difficulty to continue the exercises at home. The women feelings of improved body awareness remained after 4-6 months. They were also more aware of their attitudes towards activities in daily life. This resulted in them not "sacrificing themselves" as they did before. In addition, the bodily and psychological changes and the concept of empowerment are discussed. CONCLUSIONS: Positive experiences from the Feldenkrais group treatment were reported, especially concerning movement ability and body awareness. The exercises were however regarded as difficult to perform as self-training on a daily basis. PMID: 21419355 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Feldenkrais Method balance classes are based on principles of motor learning and postural control retraining: a qualitative research study.

Related Articles Feldenkrais Method balance classes are based on principles of motor learning and postural control retraining: a qualitative research study. Physiotherapy. 2010 Dec;96(4):324-36 Authors: Connors KA, Galea MP, Said CM, Remedios LJ Abstract BACKGROUND: Feldenkrais Method balance classes have been found to be effective in improving balance in recent studies, but there has been little research into possible mechanisms behind the effectiveness of these classes. Indeed, there has been little research into the content of any balance training classes. OBJECTIVES: To analyse the content of a series of Feldenkrais Method balance classes to gain an understanding of how the results in these studies may have been achieved and the principles through which the method may be effective. DESIGN: Qualitative research approach (content analysis). METHOD: Feldenkrais Method Awareness Through Movement lessons were transcribed and the contents were analysed. An intercoder reliability study was undertaken. RESULTS: The content analysis revealed that the classes used motor skill acquisition elements of internal feedback, repetition and variability of practice using an exploratory learning approach. Postural control skills of intersegmental coordination of ankle/hip/trunk synergies were practised, with control of the centre of mass over the base of support explored in anterior/posterior, medio/lateral, diagonal, rotational and circular directions. Key findings were the extensive involvement of trunk flexibility and control in the balance activities, and also the intensive attention to internal feedback which was linked to body awareness training. CONCLUSION: The Awareness Through Movement lessons contained many elements consistent with current theories of motor skill acquisition and postural control, providing a sound theoretical basis for the effectiveness of the Feldenkrais approach in improving balance. The methodology used in this study may provide a useful model for similar investigations into other balance training approaches. PMID: 21056168 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Qi Gong exercises and Feldenkrais method from the perspective of Gestalt concept and humanistic psychology.

Related Articles Qi Gong exercises and Feldenkrais method from the perspective of Gestalt concept and humanistic psychology. J Bodyw Mov Ther. 2010 Jul;14(3):227-33 Authors: Posadzki P, Stöckl A, Mucha D Abstract This study describes two similar approaches to human movement: Qi Gong exercises and the Feldenkrais method. These systems are investigated in terms of Gestalt concepts and humanistic psychology. Moshe Feldenkrais created the concept known as Awareness Through Movement. This concept assumes that by becoming more aware of one's movements, one functions at a higher level. In similar ways to those using the Feldenkrais method, individuals may become more aware of their own movements by performing Qi Gong exercises: A therapeutic modality that facilitates mind-body integration. Qi Gong exercises commonly lead to increased personal awareness accompained by enhanced quality, fluency and smoothness of movement. These two methods of movement therapies are explored in terms of their relations with Gestalt concept and humanistic psychology. PMID: 20538219 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Effects of Feldenkrais exercises on balance, mobility, balance confidence, and gait performance in community-dwelling adults age 65 and older.

Related Articles Effects of Feldenkrais exercises on balance, mobility, balance confidence, and gait performance in community-dwelling adults age 65 and older. J Altern Complement Med. 2010 Jan;16(1):97-105 Authors: Ullmann G, Williams HG, Hussey J, Durstine JL, McClenaghan BA Abstract BACKGROUND: Falls and fall-related injuries are a major public health concern, a financial challenge for health care providers, and critical issues for older adults. Poor balance and limited mobility are major risk factors for falls. OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to examine effects of Feldenkrais exercises in improving balance, mobility, and balance confidence in older adults. METHODS: Participants (N = 47, mean age 75.6) were randomly assigned to a Feldenkrais group (FG, n = 25) or to a control group (CG, n = 22). The FG group attended a 5-week Feldenkrais program, 60 minutes three times per week, while the CG group was a waitlist control. The outcome measures were balance (tandem stance), mobility (Timed Up and Go), gait characteristics (GAITRite Walkway System), balance confidence (Balance Confidence Scale; ABC), and fear of falling (Falls Efficacy Scale). Pre- and post-tests were conducted. RESULTS: After completion of the program, balance (p = 0.030) and mobility (p = 0.042) increased while fear of falling (p = 0.042) decreased significantly for the FG group. No other significant changes were observed. However, participants of the FG group showed improvements in balance confidence (p = 0.054) and mobility while performing concurrently a cognitive task (p = 0.067). CONCLUSIONS: These results indicate that Feldenkrais exercises are an effective way to improve balance and mobility, and thus offer an alternative method to help offset age-related declines in mobility and reduce the risk of falling among community-dwelling older adults. A long-term follow-up study of balance and mobility is warranted. Further research is needed to identify whether Feldenkrais exercises may impact cognitive processes. PMID: 20070145 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Alternative methods of conservative treatment of idiopathic scoliosis.

Related Articles Alternative methods of conservative treatment of idiopathic scoliosis. Ortop Traumatol Rehabil. 2009 Sep-Oct;11(5):396-412 Authors: Zarzycka M, Rozek K, Zarzycki M Abstract Scoliosis is a deformity of the spine known since Hippocrates times. The value of certain methods of conservative treatment remains controversial. Some of them have only a psychological value both for the physician and his or her caregivers. Based on current literature and the Scoliosis Research Society Report of Alternative Methods of Treatment of Idiopathic Scoliosis, we describe the effectiveness of various alternative methods, such as exercise, Dobosiewicz technique, Karski method, SEAS 02, acupuncture, Alexander technique, aromatherapy, ayurveda, ASCO treatment, biofeedback, chiropractic, Yoga, Feldenkrais method, Pilates method, massage therapy, rolfing, magnet therapy, surface electrical stimulation, PNF, Copes system, and bracing. PMID: 19920282 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

[A workplace intervention aimed at increasing awareness in nursing personnel performing manual handling activities].

Related Articles [A workplace intervention aimed at increasing awareness in nursing personnel performing manual handling activities]. G Ital Med Lav Ergon. 2007 Jul-Sep;29(3 Suppl):857-8 Authors: Scorpiniti A, Lorusso A, L'Abbate N Abstract Here we describe a workplace intervention aimed at reducing the risk of low back pain in nursing personnel. The intervention we carried out included a specific ergonomic training and an exercise program according to the Feldenkrais Method. After the intervention, we evaluated its effect on the execution of manual handling activities in nurses. We found an increased rate of correct manual handling in the post-intervention period. PMID: 18410001 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Feldenkrais Method, Alexander Technique, and yoga--body awareness therapy in the performing arts.

Related Articles Feldenkrais Method, Alexander Technique, and yoga--body awareness therapy in the performing arts. Phys Med Rehabil Clin N Am. 2006 Nov;17(4):865-75 Authors: Schlinger M Abstract The three disciplines described are practiced by many individuals for a myriad of reasons. Depending upon ability and depth of study, teachers of all three disciplines may have specific competencies with which to analyse, instruct, and interact with students/clients. In the author's experience, persons who seek out these practices and incorporate them into their daily lives and expressions of physical activity often are motivated to maintain or establish an optimal state of well-being and function. Physicians and therapists who work with performing artists are in a position to encourage such positive direction in patients, provide information on local resources, and consider the practices as collaborative and adjunctive to medical care. PMID: 17097486 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Comments on "the Feldenkrais Method: a dynamic approach to changing motor behavior".

Related Articles Comments on "the Feldenkrais Method: a dynamic approach to changing motor behavior". Res Q Exerc Sport. 2003 Jun;74(2):116-23; discussion 124-6 Authors: Ives JC Abstract The Feldenkrais Method has recently been discussed to fit within a dynamic systems model of human movement. One basis for this discussion is that small changes in one system--for example, enhanced body awareness--has far reaching implications across the whole of human performance. An alternative view on the Feldenkrais Method is argued here. It is argued that the clinical data do not support the Feldenkrais Method as being an effective way to improve motor performance. Further, it is argued that positive outcomes in pain and other wellness measures following Feldenkrais interventions can be ascribed to self-regulation. As part of this discussion, the role of body awareness, attentional focus, and kinesthesia in motor leaning and control are explored. PMID: 12848224 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

The Feldenkrais Method® in rehabilitation: a review.

Related Articles The Feldenkrais Method® in rehabilitation: a review. Work. 1998;11(1):75-90 Authors: Ives JC, Shelley GA Abstract Musculoskeletal disorders are often suggested to be caused, in part, by poor postural behaviors that are associated with occupational demands. The inefficacy of conventional strategies to elicit postural correction has prompted many to seek alternative techniques such as the Feldenkrais Method®. The rapidly growing use of the Feldenkrais Method® by laypersons and professionals has been fueled by extravagant claims and data published in non-peer-reviewed sources, for the effectiveness of this technique has been poorly documented in peer-reviewed publications. Therefore the purpose of this review was to critically assess the literature on the Feldenkrais Method® in both juried and non-juried sources. The results have generally indicated some improvement with Feldenkrais® interventions, however, these improvements are not nearly as large as suggested by the anecdotal claims. Unfortunately, most of the juried and non-juried findings and conclusions are questionable due to inadequately controlled studies and other serious methodological problems. As such, determination of the effectiveness of the Feldenkrais Method® based on the literature is difficult at best, and the only justifiable conclusion is that more study is warranted. PMID: 24441485 [PubMed]

Physical and mental practices of music students as they relate to the occurrence of music-related injuries.

Related Articles Physical and mental practices of music students as they relate to the occurrence of music-related injuries. Work. 1996;6(1):11-24 Authors: Hagglund KL, Jacobs K Abstract OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was two-fold: To obtain descriptive information regarding general physical and mental habits of music students and to ascertain if there are any associations between specific daily activities or habits and the appearances of these injuries. STUDY DESIGN: Questionnaires were distributed to three hundred music students at Boston University. Of the 45 respondents, 19 students were willing to participate in an interview. Descriptive statistics were analyzed and comparisons were made to a similar study which was conducted at New England Conservatory in Boston, Massachusetts (Hagglund, K., Unpublished study, 1994). RESULTS: The results suggest that Boston University music students follow expected trends reported in previous research (Fishbein and Middlestadt, 1988; Manchester and Fielder, 1991; Hagglund, 1994). Eighty two percent (n=37) of the respondents were performance majors and the majority of them began playing their instrument at age 10. Out of the 45 respondents, 28 were female of whom 68% (n=19) reported having a music-related injury. Of the remaining 17 males, 53% (n=9) reported also having a music-related injury. Sophomores and juniors accounted for 15 (54%) of the total 28 musicians with injuries in this study. The typical practice habits that were described by the respondents included 2 h sessions, with 10-15 min breaks each hour. Most musicians disclosed to occasionally playing their instruments even when experiencing pain. RESULTS from this study suggest that as the hours spent playing increased, so did the incidence of injury. Medical attention from neurologists, general practitioners, performing arts specialists and laryngologists was pursued by 18 (64%) of the 28 injured musicians. Sixty-one percent of the respondents with injuries saw more than one rehabilitation specialists, including physical therapists (50%); Alexander/Feldenkrais teachers (44%) and massage therapists (28%). More than one treatment method was given to 74% of the injured. These treatment methods included methods such as: Altering posture, habits or playing technique, exercise and stretching, rest, ice and massage. Satisfaction in career and the ability to live up to self expectations was high, while performance anxiety was not bothersome for 82% of the respondents. Fifty-two percent reported reacting well to stress and 44% described having an average level of self-consciousness. Most respondents (89%) participated in some type of physical fitness, most exercising either one (30%) or three (23%) days a week, and 75% reported that they stretch prior to playing. CONCLUSION: This study provides information on the general habits of music studtents which can be beneficial to rehabilitation specialists, as well as other medical professionals treating musicians. By understanding the lifestyles and dynamics of being a musician, rehabilitation specialists can devise better individualized intervention and preventative strategies. Unfortunately, musicians remain uninformed on the current treatments, rehabilitation approaches, and most importantly the predisposing and preventative factors of music-related injuries. Occupational therapists, physical therapists and other rehabilitation specialists can and should be the professionals to provide guidance to the population of musicians on the above mentioned factors. PMID: 24441426 [PubMed]

The older person has a stroke: Learning to adapt using the Feldenkrais® Method.

Related Articles The older person has a stroke: Learning to adapt using the Feldenkrais® Method. Top Stroke Rehabil. 1995 Jan;1(4):17-31 Authors: Jackson-Wyatt O Abstract The older person with a stroke requires adapted therapeutic interventions to take into account normal age-related changes. The Feldenkrais® Method presents a model for learning to promote adaptability that addresses key functional changes seen with normal aging. Clinical examples related to specific functional tasks are discussed to highlight major treatment modifications and neuromuscular, psychological, emotional, and sensory considerations. PMID: 27619899 [PubMed]
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