Cybermedlife - Therapeutic Actions Dietary Modification - Allergen Free Diet


Reversal of premature ovarian failure in a patient with Sjögren syndrome using an elimination diet protocol.

Abstract Title: Reversal of premature ovarian failure in a patient with Sjögren syndrome using an elimination diet protocol. Abstract Source: J Altern Complement Med. 2010 Jul;16(7):807-9. PMID: 20618099 Abstract Author(s): Joe Feuerstein Article Affiliation: Department of Integrative Medicine, Stamford Hospital, Stamford, CT 06902, USA. This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. Abstract: BACKGROUND: Premature ovarian failure is diagnosed with a picture of amenorrhea, elevated follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), and age under 40 years. Twenty percent (20%) of patients with premature ovarian failure have a concomitant autoimmune disease. Cases of premature ovarian failure associated with Sjögren syndrome have been reported in the literature. PATIENT AND METHOD: We report a case of a 42-year-old white woman with Sjögren syndrome and premature ovarian failure who underwent a reversal of her premature ovarian failure and restoration of normal menses using an elimination diet protocol. The patient was diagnosed with her rheumatological condition in 2005 and started on disease-modifying antirheumatoid drugs, which were taken intermittently due to a concern over medication side-effects. Her menses became irregular at the time of initial diagnosis and finally ceased in 2006, with a dramatic elevation in her FSH, indicative of autoimmune-induced premature ovarian failure. In March 2009, she commenced an elimination diet protocol, eliminating gluten, beef, eggs, dairy products, nightshade vegetables, refined sugars, and citrus fruit for 4 months. RESULTS: Her repeat laboratory tests after 4 months showed a drop in FSH from 88 to 6.5 and a drop in erythrocyte sedimentation rate from 40 to 16. Her menses also resumed and her rheumatological symptoms significantly improved. CONCLUSIONS: It is hypothesized that the restoration of normal menses was caused by reduced inflammation in the ovarian tissue and supports the hypothesis that the gut immune system can influence autoimmune disease and inflammation. Article Published Date : Jul 01, 2010

Effect of exclusion diet with nutraceutical therapy in juvenile Crohn's disease.

Abstract Title: Effect of exclusion diet with nutraceutical therapy in juvenile Crohn's disease. Abstract Source: J Am Coll Nutr. 2009 Jun;28(3):277-85. PMID: 20150601 Abstract Author(s): Alfred E Slonim, Melvyn Grovit, Linda Bulone Article Affiliation: M.D., Division of Clinical Genetics, Department of Pediatrics, Columbia University College of Physicians&Surgeons, New York, New York 10032, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.. Abstract: BACKGROUND: Most moderate-severe juvenile Crohn's disease (CD) patients are in a constant catabolic state resulting in poor weight gain and growth failure. Anti-inflammatory, immunomodulatory, and monoclonal antibody drugs, as well as growth hormone (GH), frequently fail to achieve sustained remission or reverse growth failure. OBJECTIVE: To test whether an exclusion diet with nutraceutical therapy (DNT) could induce sustained clinical remission and weight gain, and if so does this enhance the ability for GH to reverse growth failure. METHODS: An uncontrolled prospective case study was undertaken in six moderate- severe CD patients, two of whom had completed growth. All were treated with DNT. Adequate caloric and protein (>/= 3g/kg/d) intake for catch up weight was prescribed. Dairy products, certain grains and carrageenan containing foods were eliminated. Nutraceuticals, consisting of fish peptides, bovine colostrum, boswellia serrata, curcumin and a multivitamin were administered daily. Lactobacillus GG, a probiotic, was administered twice weekly. Recombinant human GH (rhGH) was administered daily. RESULTS: Within 2 months of starting DNT all six patients went into remission, with discontinuation of all pharmacological drugs. Three patients have remained in sustained remission for 4 to 8 years. One patient with very severe CD had recurrence of CD symptoms after being in complete remission for 18 months, one patient was in remission for 3 years but symptoms recurred when she became less compliant to DNT and one recently treated patient remains in remission after 6 months. With the addition of rhGH, the 4 growing patients had good-excellent growth response CONCLUSION: DNT engendered prolonged remission and restoration of normal weight in moderate-severe juvenile CD patients, providing conditions that enabled rhGH to stimulate growth. These findings justify larger controlled trials to evaluate the long-term benefit of compliance to DNT in both juvenile and adult CD patients. Article Published Date : Jun 01, 2009

Dietary exclusions for improving established atopic eczema in adults and children: systematic review.

Abstract Title: Dietary exclusions for improving established atopic eczema in adults and children: systematic review. Abstract Source: Allergy. 2009 Feb;64(2):258-64. PMID: 19178405 Abstract Author(s): F Bath-Hextall, F M Delamere, H C Williams Article Affiliation: Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, University of Nottingham, Nottingham, UK. Abstract: Atopic eczema is the most common inflammatory skin disease of childhood in developed countries. We performed a systematic review of randomized controlled trials to assess the effects of dietary exclusions for the treatment of established atopic eczema. Nine trials (421 participants) were included, most of which were poorly reported. Six were studies of egg and milk exclusion (n = 288), one was a study of few foods (n = 85) and two were studies of an elemental diet (n = 48). There appears to be no benefit of an egg- and milk-free diet in unselected participants with atopic eczema. There is also no evidence of benefit in the use of an elemental or few-foods diet in unselected cases of atopic eczema. There may be some benefit in using an egg-free diet in infants with suspected egg allergy who have positive specific IgE to eggs - one study found 51% of the children had a significant improvement in body surface area with the exclusion diet as compared with normal diet (95% CI 1.07-2.11) and change in surface area and severity score was significantly improved in the exclusion diet as compared with the normal diet at the end of 6 weeks (MD 5.50, 95% CI 0.19-10.81) and end of treatment (MD 6.10, 95% CI 0.06-12.14). Despite their frequent use, we find little good quality evidence to support the use of exclusion diets in atopic eczema. Article Published Date : Feb 01, 2009

Comparisons of a chicken-based formula with soy-based formula in infants with cow milk allergy.

Abstract Title: Comparisons of a chicken-based formula with soy-based formula in infants with cow milk allergy. Abstract Source: Asia Pac J Clin Nutr. 2007;16(4):711-5. PMID: 18042533 Abstract Author(s): Pipop Jirapinyo, Narumon Densupsoontorn, Renu Wongarn, Nuchnoi Thamonsiri Abstract: OBJECTIVE: To determine whether chicken-based formula can replace soy-based formula in infants with cow milk allergy. SUBJECTS AND METHODS: Thirty-eight infants with cow's milk allergy, aged between 2-24 months of age were randomized to receive either chicken-based formula or soy-based formula for 14 days. RESULTS: In the group of soy-based formula, 12 out of 18 infants had evidence of intolerance and could not continue with the formula. However, only 4 out of 20 infants in the chicken-based formula group had evidence of clinical intolerance. All other 16 infants were fed the chicken-based formula with success. The number of infants who were intolerant to chicken formula was significantly lower than the number of those fed soy-based formula (p = 0.009). CONCLUSION: Chicken-based formula can be used more effectively than soy-based formula in infants with cow milk allergy. Article Published Date : Jan 01, 2007

Treatment of eosinophilic esophagitis with specific food elimination diet directed by a combination of skin prick and patch tests.

Abstract Title: Treatment of eosinophilic esophagitis with specific food elimination diet directed by a combination of skin prick and patch tests. Abstract Source: Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol. 2005 Oct;95(4):336-43. PMID: 16279563 Abstract Author(s): Jonathan M Spergel, Timothy Andrews, Terri F Brown-Whitehorn, Janet L Beausoleil, Chris A Liacouras Article Affiliation: Division of Allergy and Immunology, The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104-4399, USA. This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. Abstract: BACKGROUND: Eosinophilic esophagitis (EE) is a recently described disorder identified in patients with symptoms suggestive of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) but unresponsive to conventional reflux therapies. Therapies have included corticosteroids, elemental diet, and diet restriction. We report our experience with skin prick and atopy patch testing and food elimination diets in patients diagnosed as having EE. OBJECTIVE: To identify food antigens that cause EE and the characteristics of patients who respond to food elimination vs those who are unresponsive. METHODS: Patients diagnosed as having EE had restricted diets based on skin prick and atopy patch testing results. Additional biopsies were performed after 4 to 8 weeks of restricted diet. Demographics, atopic tendencies, and food antigens were identified retrospectively in our food allergy database. RESULTS: A total of 146 patients diagnosed as having EE were evaluated with skin prick and atopy patch testing. Thirty-nine patients had unequivocal demonstration of food causing EE, with normalization of biopsy results on elimination and reoccurrence on reintroduction. An additional 73 patients, for a total 112 (77%) of 146 patients, had resolution of their EE as demonstrated by biopsy results. Fifteen (10%) of 146 patients were nonresponders manifested by no significant reduction in esophageal eosinophils despite restricted diet based on skin prick and atopy patch testing. Egg, milk, and soy were identified most frequently with skin prick testing, whereas corn, soy, and wheat were identified most frequently with atopy patch testing. CONCLUSION: In more than 75% of patients with EE, both symptoms and esophageal inflammation can be significantly improved with dietary elimination of foods. Skin prick and atopy patch testing can help identify foods in most patients. Article Published Date : Oct 01, 2005
Prev12Next
Therapeutic Actions DIETARY MODIFICATION Allergen Free Diet

NCBI pubmed

Delayed Immunomodulatory Effect of Cow Milk-Free Diet in Ménière's Disease.

Related Articles Delayed Immunomodulatory Effect of Cow Milk-Free Diet in Ménière's Disease. J Am Coll Nutr. 2017 Oct 31;:1-5 Authors: Di Berardino F, Zanetti D Abstract OBJECTIVE: Since 1930, dietary modification has been proposed as adjunct treatment in Ménière's disease (MD) with different and controversial results. We report the case of a 42-year-old female suffering from definite MD and intermittent seasonal allergic rhino-conjunctivitis because it highlights the importance of evaluating the different combinations of defined causative elements in an atopic patient with MD. METHODS: An immunological and audiological evaluation was performed, including pure-tone, speech, and immittance audiometry; glycerol dehydration test; bithermal caloric testing; video head impulse test; cervical vestibular evoked myogenic potentials; static posturography; and Dizziness Handicap Inventory questionnaire. RESULTS: A milk-free diet was crucial to relief from MD symptoms and a cow's milk challenge test was able to evoke them but vestibukar symptoms persist. CONCLUSIONS: The effect of dietary modification was evident only after specific immunotherapies against other allergens. This highlights the importance of evaluating different combinations of defined causative elements in the allergic treatment of MD. PMID: 29087236 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]