Therapeutic Actions Phlebotomy

NCBI pubmed

The Effect of Diagnostic Blood Loss on Anemia and Transfusion Among Postoperative Patients With Congenital Heart Disease in a Pediatric Intensive Care Unit.

The Effect of Diagnostic Blood Loss on Anemia and Transfusion Among Postoperative Patients With Congenital Heart Disease in a Pediatric Intensive Care Unit. J Pediatr Nurs. 2017 Nov 04;38:62-67 Authors: Zhou D, Luo YL, Luo SH, Feng M, Tang ML Abstract PURPOSE: To evaluate whether diagnostic blood loss can lead to anemia and consequent blood transfusion among postoperative patients with congenital heart disease (CHD) in the pediatric intensive care unit (PICU). DESIGN AND METHODS: This prospective observational study was conducted in a university-affiliated tertiary hospital between January and August 2016. CHD patients aged <12years, undergoing cardiac surgery, with a PICU stay >48h were included (n=205). Multivariate logistic regression analyses were used to determine the effect of diagnostic blood loss on anemia and transfusion. RESULTS: The mean daily phlebotomy volume was 5.40±1.94mL/d during the PICU stay (adjusted for body weight, 0.63±0.36mL/kg/d). Daily volume/kg was associated with cyanotic CHD, Pediatric Risk of Mortality III score, and Pediatric Logistic Organ Dysfunction (PELOD)-2 score. In total, 101 (49.3%) patients presented with new or more severe anemia after admission to PICU, which was not associated with phlebotomy volume. Forty-one (20.0%) children received one or more RBC transfusions during their PICU stay. Multivariate analysis indicated that PELOD-2 score>5, new or more severe anemia, and daily volume/kg of phlebotomy >0.63mL/kg/d were significantly associated with transfusion after 48h of admission to PICU. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings indicate that diagnostic blood loss is not related to postoperative anemia in children with CHD; however, this factor does correlate with blood transfusion, since it somewhat reflects the severity of illness. PRACTICE IMPLICATIONS: Strategies should be applied to reduce diagnostic blood loss, as appropriate. PMID: 29167083 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

Effect of Clinical Variables on the Volume of Blood Collected for Blood Cultures in an Adult Patient Population.

Related Articles Effect of Clinical Variables on the Volume of Blood Collected for Blood Cultures in an Adult Patient Population. Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol. 2017 Nov 21;:1-5 Authors: Jones RL, Sayles HR, Fey PD, Rupp ME Abstract OBJECTIVE To identify clinical variables that influence blood culture volume recovery DESIGN Retrospective chart review and linear model analysis SETTING A 621-bed Academic Medical Center with a Clinical Laboratory that processes 20,000+ blood cultures annually and dedicated phlebotomy staff for venipuncture PATIENTS Consecutive patients requiring blood culture METHODS Over a 6-day period, blood volume was determined in 568 culture bottles from 128 unique adult patients, and clinical data from the time of phlebotomy were extracted from hospital electronic medical records. Conditional hierarchical linear models with random effects for patient and phlebotomy occasion were utilized to analyze correlations between values collected from the same patient and during the same phlebotomy occasion. RESULTS Blood samples obtained from a central venous catheter yielded, on average, 2.53 mL more blood (95% CI, 1.63-3.44 mL; P<.001) than those from peripheral venipuncture, and aerobic bottles contained 0.38 mL more blood (95% CI, 0.1-0.67 mL; P=.009) than the anaerobic bottles. The remaining clinical variables (eg, hospital department, patient age, body mass index, gender, mean arterial pressure, concomitant systemic antibiotic use, and Charlson comorbidity index score) failed to reach statistical significance (P<.05) in relation to volume. CONCLUSIONS Blood cultures obtained from central venous catheters contain significantly greater volume than those obtained via peripheral venipuncture. These data highlight the clinically significant issue of low culture volume recovery, indicate that diagnostic and prognostic tools that rely on volume-dependent phenomena (ie, time to positivity) may require further validation under usual clinical practice circumstances, and suggest goals for future institutional performance improvement. Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol 2017:1-5. PMID: 29157318 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]