Cybermedlife - Therapeutic Actions Acupuncture


Acupuncture plus point-injection for 32 cases of obstinate urticaria

Abstract Title: Acupuncture plus point-injection for 32 cases of obstinate urticaria. Abstract Source: J Tradit Chin Med. 2006 Mar;26(1):22-3. PMID: 16705847 Abstract Author(s): Yanhong Zhao Abstract: In order to observe the therapeutic effects of acupuncture plus point-injection for obstinate urticaria, 64 cases of obstinate urticaria were randomly divided into the following two groups. 32 cases in the treatment group were treated with acupuncture at the points of Quchi (LI11), Xuehai (SP10), Zusanli (ST 36), Sanyinjiao (SP6) and Fengchi (GB20) plus point-injection at the points of Zusanli (ST36) and Quchi (LI11). 32 cases in the control group were treated with antihistamines (such as Acrivastine, Cinnarizine or Ranitidine). The results showed that the therapeutic effect in the treatment group was obviously better than that in the control group (P < 0.05), with a much lower relapse rate in the former than that in the latter (P < 0.01). Article Published Date : Mar 01, 2006
Therapeutic Actions Acupuncture

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Therapeutic Actions Acupuncture

Factors related to acupuncture response in patients with chronic severe functional constipation: Secondary analysis of a randomized controlled trial.

Related Articles Factors related to acupuncture response in patients with chronic severe functional constipation: Secondary analysis of a randomized controlled trial. PLoS One. 2017;12(11):e0187723 Authors: Yang X, Liu Y, Liu B, He L, Liu Z, Yan Y, Liu J, Liu B Abstract BACKGROUND: Acupuncture has been demonstrated to be effective and safe for chronic severe functional constipation (CSFC). However, which patients with CSFC will have a better response to acupuncture remains unclear. OBJECTIVE: To explore factors related to acupuncture response in patients with CSFC. METHODS: We performed a secondary analysis of a previous multicenter randomized controlled trial consisting of a 2-week run-in period, 8-week treatment, and 12-week follow-up without treatment in which patients with CSFC were randomly allocated to an electroacupuncture group or a sham electroacupuncture group. Responders were defined as participants with an increase of at least one complete spontaneous bowel movement (CSBM) in week 20 compared with the baseline period. The CSBM responder rate in both groups was described, and the baseline characteristics of participants potentially related to acupuncture response were mainly analyzed using logistic regression analysis with bootstrapping techniques. RESULTS: A total of 1021 participants were analyzed in this study, of whom 516 (50.5%) were classified as responders. The CSBM responder rate in week 20 was significantly greater in the electroacupuncture group than in the sham electroacupuncture group (62.9% vs. 37.9%, respectively; P<0.001). Both age and comorbidity were negatively associated with clinical response: with every one-year increase in age, the likelihood of clinical response was reduced by 1.2% (OR 0.988, 95%CI 0.980 to 0.996; P = 0.005), and patients with comorbidities were approximately 42% less likely to respond to treatment (OR 0.581, 95%CI 0.248 to 0.914; P = 0.001). CONCLUSION: CSFC patients with increasing age and comorbidity may be less likely to respond to acupuncture. These findings contribute to guiding clinical practice in terms of pretreatment patient selection. Further research is needed to confirm the association. PMID: 29166673 [PubMed - in process]

Improved medical expenditure and survival with integration of traditional Chinese medicine treatment in patients with heart failure: A nationwide population-based cohort study.

Related Articles Improved medical expenditure and survival with integration of traditional Chinese medicine treatment in patients with heart failure: A nationwide population-based cohort study. Oncotarget. 2017 Oct 27;8(52):90465-90476 Authors: Tsai MY, Hu WL, Chiang JH, Huang YC, Chen SY, Hung YC, Chen YH Abstract Background: No previous studies have evaluated the effects of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) treatment on patients with heart failure (HF). Hence, in this study, we determined whether TCM treatment affects the healthcare burden and survival of HF patients. Methods: Samples were retrieved from the registry of catastrophic illness patients of the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database (NHIRD). Based on a frequency (1:1) matched case-control design, patients with HF between 2000 and 2010 were designated as cases (TCM users) and controls (non-TCM users). TCM treatment for patients with HF was analyzed. Results: Among these patients, 312 used TCM for HF treatment and exhibited significantly increased 5-year survival (p < .0001), with multivariate adjustment, compared with those without TCM use. Mean outpatient clinic visits at 1 year and 5 years after HF diagnosis were higher in TCM users, and accumulated medical costs were lower than in non-TCM users at 1 year. The hospitalization cost at 1-year follow-up was lower for TCM users than for non-TCM users. We found that, compared with non-TCM users, TCM users had an 86% reduction in risk of mortality in the compensated group, and a 68% reduction in the decompensated group receiving TCM treatment (aHR 0.32, 95% CI 0.20-0.52). The hazard ratio (HR) of Chinese herbal medicine (CHM) users with HF was significantly lower than that of non-users (aHR 0.24, 95% CI 0.16-0.35). We also analyzed the most commonly used herbal products as well as the HRs associated with their use, thus providing future research avenues. Conclusions: This nationwide retrospective cohort study finds that combined therapy with TCM may improve survival in HF patients. This study also suggests that TCM may be used as an integral element of HF interventions on health care costs. PMID: 29163845 [PubMed]

Identifying current and remitted major depressive disorder with the Hurst exponent: a comparative study on two automated anatomical labeling atlases.

Related Articles Identifying current and remitted major depressive disorder with the Hurst exponent: a comparative study on two automated anatomical labeling atlases. Oncotarget. 2017 Oct 27;8(52):90452-90464 Authors: Jing B, Long Z, Liu H, Yan H, Dong J, Mo X, Li D, Liu C, Li H Abstract Major depressive disorder (MDD) is a leading world-wide psychiatric disorder with high recurrence rate, therefore, it is desirable to identify current MDD (cMDD) and remitted MDD (rMDD) for their appropriate therapeutic interventions. In the study, 19 cMDD, 19 rMDD and 19 well-matched healthy controls (HC) were enrolled and scanned with the resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rs-fMRI). The Hurst exponent (HE) of rs-fMRI in AAL-90 and AAL-1024 atlases were calculated and compared between groups. Then, a radial basis function (RBF) based support vector machine was proposed to identify every pair of the cMDD, rMDD and HC groups using the abnormal HE features, and a leave-one-out cross-validation was used to evaluate the classification performance. Applying the proposed method with AAL-1024 and AAL-90 atlas respectively, 87% and 84% subjects were correctly identified between cMDD and HC, 84% and 71% between rMDD and HC, and 89% and 74% between cMDD and rMDD. Our results indicated that the HE was an effective feature to distinguish cMDD and rMDD from HC, and the recognition performances with AAL-1024 parcellation were better than that with the conventional AAL-90 parcellation. PMID: 29163844 [PubMed]