Therapeutic Actions Head-Out Water Immersion

NCBI pubmed

Peripheral chemosensitivity is not blunted during 2 h of thermoneutral head out water immersion in healthy men and women.

Related Articles Peripheral chemosensitivity is not blunted during 2 h of thermoneutral head out water immersion in healthy men and women. Physiol Rep. 2017 Nov;5(20): Authors: Sackett JR, Schlader ZJ, Sarker S, Chapman CL, Johnson BD Abstract Carbon dioxide (CO2) retention occurs during water immersion, but it is not known if peripheral chemosensitivity is altered during water immersion, which could contribute to CO2 retention. We tested the hypothesis that peripheral chemosensitivity to hypercapnia and hypoxia is blunted during 2 h of thermoneutral head out water immersion (HOWI) in healthy young adults. Peripheral chemosensitivity was assessed by the ventilatory, heart rate, and blood pressure responses to hypercapnia and hypoxia at baseline, 10, 60, 120 min, and post HOWI and a time-control visit (control). Subjects inhaled 1 breath of 13% CO2, 21% O2, and 66% N2 to test peripheral chemosensitivity to hypercapnia and 2-6 breaths of 100% N2 to test peripheral chemosensitivity to hypoxia. Each gas was administered four separate times at each time point. Partial pressure of end-tidal CO2 (PETCO2), arterial oxygen saturation (SpO2), ventilation, heart rate, and blood pressure were recorded continuously. Ventilation was higher during HOWI versus control at post (P = 0.037). PETCO2 was higher during HOWI versus control at 10 min (46 ± 2 vs. 44 ± 2 mmHg), 60 min (46 ± 2 vs. 44 ± 2 mmHg), and 120 min (46 ± 3 vs. 43 ± 3 mmHg) (all P < 0.001). Ventilatory (P = 0.898), heart rate (P = 0.760), and blood pressure (P = 0.092) responses to hypercapnia were not different during HOWI versus control at any time point. Ventilatory (P = 0.714), heart rate (P = 0.258), and blood pressure (P = 0.051) responses to hypoxia were not different during HOWI versus control at any time point. These data indicate that CO2 retention occurs during thermoneutral HOWI despite no changes in peripheral chemosensitivity. PMID: 29051306 [PubMed - in process]