Cybermedlife - Therapeutic Actions Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM)


Use of Complementary Therapies in Cardiovascular Disease.

Abstract Title: Use of Complementary Therapies in Cardiovascular Disease. Abstract Source: Am J Cardiol. 2012 Nov 24. Epub 2012 Nov 24. PMID: 23186602 Abstract Author(s): Kavita Prasad, Varun Sharma, Kandace Lackore, Sarah M Jenkins, Abhiram Prasad, Amit Sood Article Affiliation: Division of General Internal Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota. Electronic address: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.. Abstract: The aim of the present study was to assess the use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) treatments in outpatients with cardiovascular disease and their interest in future use. The increasing popularity of CAM therapies highlights the need to explore their use among patients with cardiovascular disease. Data were collected with a prospective, point-of-care, anonymous, 17-question survey about basic medical information and previous use and interest in the future use of dietary supplements and other CAM interventions among patients undergoing outpatient cardiology evaluation at a Midwestern tertiary care center. The survey was completed by 1,055 patients (655 men, 351 women; mean age 63.5 years) of whom 98.1% were white. Of these, 36.8% had cardiac symptoms for>10 years, 48.2% had coronary artery disease, and 82.5% reported use of CAM therapies. Of these patients, 75.4% reported using dietary supplements, 31.5% chiropractic therapy, 23.9% mind-body therapies, and 19.2% massage. Only 14.4% had discussed the use of CAM treatments with their physicians. The top 4 treatments used for cardiac symptoms were relaxation techniques, stress management, meditation, and guided imagery. Also, 48.6% were interested in participating in a future clinical trial of an alternative treatment. The great majority of patients seen in current practice use CAM therapies, and a large proportion expressed an interest in participating in research with CAM therapies. In conclusion, research directed with an integrative approach to cardiovascular care might prove beneficial when designing future studies. Article Published Date : Nov 23, 2012

A systematic review and meta-analysis of efficacy, cost-effectiveness, and safety of selected complementary and alternative medicine for neck and low-back pain.

Abstract Title: A systematic review and meta-analysis of efficacy, cost-effectiveness, and safety of selected complementary and alternative medicine for neck and low-back pain. Abstract Source: Evid Based Complement Alternat Med. 2012 ;2012:953139. Epub 2011 Nov 24. PMID: 22203884 Abstract Author(s): Andrea D Furlan, Fatemeh Yazdi, Alexander Tsertsvadze, Anita Gross, Maurits Van Tulder, Lina Santaguida, Joel Gagnier, Carlo Ammendolia, Trish Dryden, Steve Doucette, Becky Skidmore, Raymond Daniel, Thomas Ostermann, Sophia Tsouros Article Affiliation: Clinical Epidemiology Methods Centre, Ottawa Hospital Research Institute, University of Ottawa Evidence-Based Practice Center, Box 208, Ottawa, ON, Canada K1H 8L6. Abstract: Background. Back pain is a common problem and a major cause of disability and health care utilization. Purpose. To evaluate the efficacy, harms, and costs of the most common CAM treatments (acupuncture, massage, spinal manipulation, and mobilization) for neck/low-back pain. Data Sources. Records without language restriction from various databases up to February 2010. Data Extraction. The efficacy outcomes of interest were pain intensity and disability. Data Synthesis. Reports of 147 randomized trials and 5 nonrandomized studies were included. CAM treatments were more effective in reducing pain and disability compared to no treatment, physical therapy (exercise and/or electrotherapy) or usual care immediately or at short-term follow-up. Trials that applied sham-acupuncture tended towards statistically nonsignificant results. In several studies, acupuncture caused bleeding on the site of application, and manipulation and massage caused pain episodes of mild and transient nature. Conclusions. CAM treatments were significantly more efficacious than no treatment, placebo, physical therapy, or usual care in reducing pain immediately or at short-term after treatment. CAM therapies did not significantly reduce disability compared to sham. None of the CAM treatments was shown systematically as superior to one another. More efforts are needed to improve the conduct and reporting of studies of CAM treatments. Article Published Date : Jan 01, 2012

Complementary and alternative medicine in the treatment of refugees and survivors of torture: a review and proposal for action.

Abstract Title: Complementary and alternative medicine in the treatment of refugees and survivors of torture: a review and proposal for action. Abstract Source: Torture. 2012 ;22(1):38-57. PMID: 23086004 Abstract Author(s): McKenna Longacre, Ellen Silver-Highfield, Puja Lama, Michael Grodin Article Affiliation: Department of Health Law, Bioethics&Human Rights, Boston University School of Public Health, Boston, MA, USA. This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.. Abstract: Survivors of torture and refugee trauma often have increased needs for mental and physical healthcare. This is due in part to the complex sequelae of trauma, including chronic pain, major depressive disorder, posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and somatization. This article reviews the scientific medical literature for the efficacy and feasibility of some complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) modalities including meditation, Ayurveda, pranayama/yogic breathing, massage/body-work, dance/movement, spirituality, yoga, music, Traditional Chinese Medicine and acupuncture, qigong, t'ai chi, chiropractic, homeopathy, aromatherapy and Reiki specifically with respect to survivors of torture and refugee trauma. We report that preliminary research suggests that the certain CAM modalities may prove effective as part of an integrated treatment plan for survivors of torture and refugee trauma. Further research is warranted. Article Published Date : Dec 31, 2011

Use of complementary and alternative medicine by patients with cluster headache: results of a multi-centre headache clinic survey.

Abstract Title: Use of complementary and alternative medicine by patients with cluster headache: results of a multi-centre headache clinic survey. Abstract Source: Complement Ther Med. 2008 Aug;16(4):220-7. Epub 2007 Jul 2. PMID: 18638713 Abstract Author(s): Paolo Rossi, Paola Torelli, Cherubino Di Lorenzo, Grazia Sances, Gian Camillo Manzoni, Cristina Tassorelli, Giuseppe Nappi Article Affiliation: Headache Centre, INI Grottaferrata, Rome, Italy. This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. Abstract: OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the rates, pattern, satisfaction with, and presence of predictors of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) use in a clinical population of patients with cluster headache (CH). DESIGN AND SETTING: One hundred CH patients attending one of three headache clinics were asked to undergo a physician-administered structured interview designed to gather information on CAM use. RESULTS: Past use of CAM therapies was reported by 29% of the patients surveyed, with 10% having used CAM in the previous year. Only 8% of the therapies used were perceived as effective, while a partial effectiveness was reported in 28% of CAM treatments. The most common source of recommendation of CAM was a friend or relative (54%). Approximately 62% of CAM users had not informed their medical doctors of their CAM use. The most common reason for deciding to try a CAM therapy was that it offered a "potential improvement of headache" (44.8%). Univariate analysis showed that CAM users had a higher income, had a higher lifetime number of conventional medical doctor visits, had consulted more headache specialists, had a higher number of CH attacks per year, and had a significantly higher proportion of chronic CH versus episodic CH. A binary logistic regression analysis was performed and two variables remained as significant predictors of CAM use: income level (OR=5.7, CI=1.6-9.1, p=0.01), and number of attacks per year (OR=3.08, CI=1.64-6.7, p<0.0001). CONCLUSION: Our findings suggest that CH patients, in their need of and quest for care, seek and explore both conventional and CAM approaches, even though only a very small minority finds them very satisfactory. Article Published Date : Aug 01, 2008
Therapeutic Actions Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM)

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Safety classification of herbal medicines used in pregnancy in a multinational study.

Related Articles Safety classification of herbal medicines used in pregnancy in a multinational study. BMC Complement Altern Med. 2016 Mar 15;16:102 Authors: Kennedy DA, Lupattelli A, Koren G, Nordeng H Abstract BACKGROUND: The use of herbal medicines for health prevention and ailments is an increasing trend worldwide. Women in pregnancy are no exception; the reported prevalence of herbal medicine use in pregnancy ranges from 1 to 60 %. Despite a common perception of safety, herbal medicines may have potent pharmacological actions, and historically, have been used for this reason. METHODS: A multinational, cross-sectional study on how women treat disease and pregnancy-related health ailments was conducted between October 2011 and February 2012 in Europe, North America, and Australia. This study's primary aim was to evaluate and classify the herbal medicines used according to their safety in pregnancy and, secondly, to investigate risk factors associated with the use of contraindicated herbal medicines during pregnancy. RESULTS: In total, 29.3 % of the women (n = 2673) reported the use of herbal medicines in pregnancy; of which we were able to identify 126 specific herbal medicines used by 2379 women (89.0 %). Twenty seven out of 126 herbal medicines were classified as contraindicated in pregnancy, and were used by 476 women (20.0 %). Twenty-eight were classified as safe for use in pregnancy and used by the largest number of women (n = 1128, 47.4 %). The greatest number was classified as requiring caution in pregnancy; these sixty herbal medicines were used by 751 women (31.6 %). Maternal factors associated with the use of contraindicated herbal medicines in pregnancy were found to be working in the home, having a university education, not using folic acid, and consuming alcohol. Interestingly, the recommendation to take a contraindicated herbal medicine was three times more likely to be from a healthcare practitioner (HCP) than an informal source. CONCLUSION: Based on the current literature the majority of women in this study used an herbal medicine that was classified as safe for use in pregnancy. Women who reported taking a contraindicated herb were more likely to have been recommended it use by an HCP rather than informal source(s), indicating an urgent need for more education among HCPs. The paucity of human studies on herbal medicines safety in pregnancy stands in stark contrast to the widespread use of these products among pregnant women. PMID: 26980526 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Perceptions of complementary and alternative medicine among cardiac patients in South Trinidad: a qualitative study.

Related Articles Perceptions of complementary and alternative medicine among cardiac patients in South Trinidad: a qualitative study. BMC Complement Altern Med. 2015 Mar 31;15:99 Authors: Bahall M, Edwards M Abstract BACKGROUND: Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) has been practiced for centuries owing to the absence or limited availability of conventional medicine. CAM has persisted globally with over USD34 billion spent annually, despite modernization, globalization, technological advancement, and limited supportive evidence. The present qualitative study explores the perception of CAM among cardiac patients with respect to rationale, perceived outcomes, influences, and public health concerns. METHODS: This study used a qualitative, interpretative approach. Twelve cardiac disease patients were recruited from private clinics in South Trinidad and interviewed. The study obtained ethical approval, and all participants provided written consent. The semi-structured interviews were digitally recorded, transcribed, and thematically analyzed. Participants with poor cognitive function, difficulty speaking, and those not understandable owing to language barriers were excluded. RESULTS: CAM use was based largely on patient perception regardless of the clinical reality. The perceived mode of action and its natural character was responsible for the therapeutic outcomes and uses. Participants reported that CAM provided holistic care, improved the quality of life, overcame the limitations of conventional medicine, satisfied their increased expectation for comprehensive care, and prevented or counteracted adverse effects caused by conventional medicine. Participants reported a lack of scientific information on CAM and stated that policy makers should assist patients through increased research, public health education, and improved integration of CAM and conventional medicine. CONCLUSIONS: The participants' use of CAM was largely based on perception. CAM was thought to improve therapeutic outcomes, provide holistic care, decrease or prevent complications from conventional medicine, and improve quality of life. Participants acknowledged that they may be ill-informed about the basic concepts or actions of CAM. They urged policymakers to create an environment that assists the public and health care providers in promoting safe and effective CAM practice. PMID: 25887906 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Tobacco brief intervention training for chiropractic, acupuncture, and massage practitioners: protocol for the CAM reach study.

Related Articles Tobacco brief intervention training for chiropractic, acupuncture, and massage practitioners: protocol for the CAM reach study. BMC Complement Altern Med. 2014 Dec 18;14:510 Authors: Muramoto ML, Howerter A, Matthews E, Floden L, Gordon J, Nichter M, Cunningham J, Ritenbaugh C Abstract BACKGROUND: Tobacco use remains the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in the US. Effective tobacco cessation aids are widely available, yet underutilized. Tobacco cessation brief interventions (BIs) increase quit rates. However, BI training has focused on conventional medical providers, overlooking other health practitioners with regular contact with tobacco users. The 2007 National Health Interview Survey found that approximately 20% of those who use provider-based complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) are tobacco users. Thus, CAM practitioners potentially represent a large, untapped community resource for promoting tobacco cessation and use of effective cessation aids. Existing BI training is not well suited for CAM practitioners' background and practice patterns, because it assumes a conventional biomedical foundation of knowledge and philosophical approaches to health, healing and the patient-practitioner relationship. There is a pressing need to develop and test the effectiveness of BI training that is both grounded in Public Health Service (PHS) Guidelines for tobacco dependence treatment and that is relevant and appropriate for CAM practitioners. METHODS/DESIGN: The CAM Reach (CAMR) intervention is a tobacco cessation BI training and office system intervention tailored specifically for chiropractors, acupuncturists and massage therapists. The CAMR study utilizes a single group one-way crossover design to examine the CAMR intervention's impact on CAM practitioners' tobacco-related practice behaviors. Primary outcomes included CAM practitioners' self-reported conduct of tobacco use screening and BIs. Secondary outcomes include tobacco using patients' readiness to quit, quit attempts, use of guideline-based treatments, and quit rates and also non-tobacco-using patients' actions to help someone else quit. DISCUSSION: CAM practitioners provide care to significant numbers of tobacco users. Their practice patterns and philosophical approaches to health and healing are well suited for providing BIs. The CAMR study is examining the impact of the CAMR intervention on practitioners' tobacco-related practice behaviors, CAM patient behaviors, and documenting factors important to the conduct of practice-based research in real-world CAM practices. PMID: 25524595 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Applications and therapeutic actions of complementary and alternative medicine for women with genital infection.

Related Articles Applications and therapeutic actions of complementary and alternative medicine for women with genital infection. Evid Based Complement Alternat Med. 2014;2014:658624 Authors: Liu C, Zhang Y, Kong S, Tsui I, Yu Y, Han F Abstract Genital infection is a common worldwide disease among females with clinical features such as bilateral lower abdominal tenderness, abnormal vaginal or cervical discharge, fever, abnormal vaginal bleeding, dyspareunia, vaginal itching, and adnexal tenderness, which can significantly impair women's health and quality of life. Genital infection is commonly treated with antibiotics, leading to an imbalance in gut flora due to prolonged use of antibiotics. Therefore, it is necessary to discover safe and efficacious alternative treatment strategies for patients with genital infection. Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) is becoming increasingly prevalent among women with genital infection. CAM has interested the western mainstream medical community because of its less invasive, safe, effective, economical, and convenient therapies. CAM focuses on the prevention and treatment of disease and has become an important force in treating chronic disease. During the last few decades, the popularity of CAM has gradually increased. To further understand the efficacy of CAM in treating genital infection, our paper will review the current progress of treating genital infection including vulvitis, vaginitis, cervicitis, and pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) with CAM therapies. Several CAM strategies including traditional Chinese medicine (TCM), acupuncture, Psychology interference, and physical therapy are introduced in this review. PMID: 24648850 [PubMed]

What is a competent homeopath and what do they need in their education? A qualitative study of educators' views.

Related Articles What is a competent homeopath and what do they need in their education? A qualitative study of educators' views. Educ Health (Abingdon). 2012 Sep-Dec;25(3):172-9 Authors: Viksveen P, Steinsbekk A, Rise MB Abstract INTRODUCTION: The rise of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) professions has taken place alongside an increase in public use of CAM therapies. Some actions have been taken to establish educational standards, often focusing on educating competent professionals to ensure citizens' freedom to make choices for their own healthcare while at the same time ensuring their safety. However, in professions like homeopathy that are unregulated in most European countries, it is not clear what it means to be a competent homeopath. The aim of this study was to investigate educators' views on what a competent homeopath is and what they require in their education. METHODS: This was a qualitative study based on grounded theory methodology involving telephone interviews with 17 educators from different schools in 10 European countries. It used constant/simultaneous comparison and analysis to develop categories and properties of educational needs and theoretical constructs and to describe behaviour and social processes. The main questions asked of subjects were "What do you think is necessary in order to educate and train a competent homeopath?" and "How would you define a competent homeopath?" RESULTS: The educators defined a competent homeopath as a professional who, through her knowledge and skills together with an awareness of her bounds of competence, is able to help her patients in the best way possible. This is achieved through the processes of study and self-development, and is supported by a set of basic resources. Becoming and being a competent homeopath is underpinned by a set of basic attitudes. These attitudes include course providers and teachers being student-centred, and students and homeopaths being patient-centred. Openness on the part of students is important to learn and develop themselves, on the part of homeopaths when treating patients, and for teachers when working with students. Practitioners have a responsibility towards their patients and themselves, course providers and teachers have responsibility for providing students with effective and appropriate teaching and learning opportunities, and students have responsibility for their own learning and development. DISCUSSION: According to homeopathy educators' understanding, basic resources and processes contribute to the development of a competent homeopath, who possesses certain knowledge and skills, all underpinned by a set of basic attitudes. PMID: 23823637 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Navigating a safe path together: a theory of midwives' responses to the use of complementary and alternative medicine.

Related Articles Navigating a safe path together: a theory of midwives' responses to the use of complementary and alternative medicine. Midwifery. 2013 Jul;29(7):801-8 Authors: Hall HG, Griffiths DL, McKenna LG Abstract OBJECTIVE: this paper presents the findings from a qualitative study that aimed to explain the processes midwives engaged in when considering the use of complementary and alternative medicine by pregnant women. DESIGN: grounded theory methodology was employed for the study. Data was generated from in-depth interviews and non-participant observation of midwives interacting with expectant mothers. Twenty-five midwives who worked in four hospitals and associated community clinics in Victoria, Australia, participated. FINDINGS: the theory 'Navigating a safe path together' offers a possible explanation of how midwives are responding. When working with women interested in the use of complementary and alternative medicine, midwives move through an iterative process of individualising pregnancy care, encountering diverse perspectives and minimising the risks associated with childbearing. KEY CONCLUSION: at the heart of the theory is the meaning midwives' construct around safe childbirth and their professional roles. Despite widespread support for the therapies, midwives' actions in clinical practice are mediated by a number of factors including the context of their professional work, their beliefs and knowledge, and the woman's expectation and health. IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE: the research highlights the need for improved education and greater professional guidance to equip midwives to respond with greater understanding, and confidence to the increasing prevalence of CAM in the maternity setting. PMID: 22884895 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Adverse drug reactions for CAM and conventional drugs detected in a network of physicians certified to prescribe CAM drugs.

Related Articles Adverse drug reactions for CAM and conventional drugs detected in a network of physicians certified to prescribe CAM drugs. J Manag Care Pharm. 2012 Jul-Aug;18(6):427-38 Authors: Tabali M, Ostermann T, Jeschke E, Witt CM, Matthes H Abstract BACKGROUND: Within recent years, the increasing popularity of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) has led health care authorities to focus on the safety of these drugs. One reason for the low awareness of adverse drug reactions (ADRs) associated with CAM might be that users and physicians believe that there are no risks associated with CAM drugs. Recent studies have shown that ADRs are under-reported and are considered a leading cause of morbidity and mortality. The Evaluation of Anthroposophical Medicine (EvaMed) Pharmacovigilance Network was formed in 2004 at the Havelhoehe Research Institute in Berlin and is composed of 38 CAM physicians located in 12 of the 16 federal states in Germany for the purpose of using EvaMed data to evaluate the prescribing patterns, effectiveness, and safety of CAM therapies. OBJECTIVE: To describe and quantify the volume and severity of ADRs for CAM and conventional (CON) drugs in a proprietary database created from prescriptions and patient data of primary care CAM physicians who participate in the EvaMed Network. METHODS: This was a prospective, multicenter, observational study based on the ADR reports and electronic prescription data of 38 individual physicians (21 general practitioners, 9 pediatricians, 4 internists, 2 gynecologists, 1 dermatologist, and 1 neurologist) participating in the EvaMed Network. In addition to standard medical education, all physicians had 5 years practical experience and an additional qualification for anthroposophic medicine, which is a subcategory of CAM. All 38 physicians documented ADRs deemed serious, defined as life threatening or resulting in death, disability/incapacity, or inpatient hospital days. Due to the time-consuming nature of documenting ADRs, only a subgroup of 7 physicians (4 in general practice and 1 each in internal medicine, pediatrics, and gynecology) agreed to report both nonserious and serious ADRs. Therefore, the incidence and frequency of ADRs were evaluated in this subgroup. The study period was January 2004 through June 2009. ADRs were documented by the physicians using an electronic case report form in the EvaMed software, which was linked to the physicians' existing electronic medical record (EMR) systems and incorporated into their daily routines to avoid missing data or double entries. The participating physicians were compensated €15 (approximately US$20) for each ADR report. All ADR reports were monitored at the Havelhoehe Research Institute by 2 physicians who evaluated patient characteristics, present visit diagnosis, target drugs, associated drug classes and type of drugs, type of ADR, actions taken for the ADR, and outcome of the ADR. RESULTS: There were 1,018,626 drugs (54.8% CAM) prescribed by the 38 physicians for 88,431 patients, and 412 ADRs reported for 389 patients; 124 (30.1%) ADRs were for CAM drugs. The majority were reported in children (69.2%, n = 285) and females (56.3%, n = 232). All serious ADRs (n = 14) were associated with CON drugs. In the subgroup of 7 physicians who agreed to report all ADRs, a total of 327 serious and nonserious ADRs were reported for 392,243 prescribed drugs (0.08%) and for 308 of 25,966 patients (1.2%). ADRs were reported for 241 of 16,032 children (aged 17 years or younger; 1.5%) versus 67 of 9,934 adults (0.7%). Of the 327 total ADRs, 10 (3.1%) were serious. There were 95 ADRs for 213,900 CAM prescriptions (4.4 per 10,000) versus 232 for 178,343 CON prescriptions (13.0 per 10,000). The CAM drug with the highest frequency of ADRs was Pelargonium sidoides root (0.21%, 4 of 1,940 prescriptions). The most frequently reported ingredient in CAM was ivy leaves with an ADR frequency of 0.17% (n = 11 of 6,575 prescriptions). The most reported drug connected with ADRs was amoxicillin (1.36%, n = 31 of 2,276 prescriptions). The most common ADR medical management was withdrawal of the drug (82.3% overall, 83.9% CAM, 81.6% CON). CONCLUSIONS: A sample of 38 CAM physicians reported the occurrence of at least 1 ADR for 0.4% of treated patients in a 5.5-year study period. There were no serious ADRs reported for CAM drugs. In a subsample of 7 physicians who agreed to report all nonserious and serious ADRs, 1.2% of patients experienced at least 1 ADR; rates of ADRs per 10,000 prescriptions were 4.4 for CAM drugs and 13.0 for CON drugs. PMID: 22839683 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Adverse events associated with the use of complementary medicine and health supplements: an analysis of reports in the Singapore Pharmacovigilance database from 1998 to 2009.

Related Articles Adverse events associated with the use of complementary medicine and health supplements: an analysis of reports in the Singapore Pharmacovigilance database from 1998 to 2009. Clin Toxicol (Phila). 2012 Jul;50(6):481-9 Authors: Patel DN, Low WL, Tan LL, Tan MM, Zhang Q, Low MY, Chan CL, Koh HL Abstract CONTEXT: The use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM), particularly herbal medicine and their derived products, have been increasing. However, sporadic reports of serious adverse effects associated with the use of these products have become a source of concern. Spontaneous adverse event reporting may be used to monitor the safety of these products. OBJECTIVE: The objectives of this study is to analyze and describe the patterns of adverse events associated with the use of Chinese Proprietary Medicine, other complementary medicine and health supplements (termed CAM products) in the Singapore Pharmacovigilance database from 1998 to 2009 and to highlight areas of safety concerns. METHODS: Adverse events associated with CAM products reviewed by the Vigilance Branch of the Health Sciences Authority for the period 1998-2009 were collated and analyzed. The following information was extracted and collated: patient demographics, type and indication of CAM products, system-organ class affected, seriousness of the adverse event, route of administration, hospitalization status, outcome of adverse event, concomitant use of conventional medicine, adulterant testing and profession of the reporter. RESULTS: In the period 1998-2009, 627 cases of adverse events due to CAM products were reported. Most of these 627 cases (80.2%) were found to be serious and most of the patients used CAM products for sexual performance enhancement (291, 46.4%), to relieve pain such as joint and neck pain (36, 5.9%) and for slimming purposes (27, 4.3%). Of the 627 cases, endocrine disorders constituted 22.5% and central nervous system disorders constituted 20.6%. Liver was the main organ involved in the serious cases. Twenty-two fatalities were reported and hepatotoxicity was responsible for the deaths of 10 patients during the study period. CONCLUSIONS: In conclusion, 627 adverse event reports associated with CAM products had been successfully analyzed and described. They constituted ~3.8% of the total number of adverse events reported from 1998 to 2009. Outbreaks of severe hypoglycemia in 2008 and 2009 were associated with the use of adulterated and illegal sexual performance enhancement products. Further work to confirm the hepatotoxicity of implicated CAM products is warranted. Reporting of suspected adverse events is strongly encouraged even if the causality is not confirmed because any signs of clustering will allow rapid regulatory actions to be taken. The analysis of spontaneously reported adverse events is important in monitoring the safety of CAM products and helps in the understanding of the benefits and risks associated with the use of such products. PMID: 22738039 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Pharmacists' actions when patients use complementary and alternative medicine with medications: A look at Texas-Mexico border cities.

Related Articles Pharmacists' actions when patients use complementary and alternative medicine with medications: A look at Texas-Mexico border cities. J Am Pharm Assoc (2003). 2011 Sep-Oct;51(5):619-22 Authors: Brown CM, Pena A, Resendiz K Abstract OBJECTIVES: To determine how often pharmacists inquire about patients' complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) use, actions taken in response to patients' CAM use, and demographic or professional characteristics that predict differences in pharmacists' actions. METHODS: A survey was mailed to 400 randomly selected community pharmacists who resided in Texas-Mexico border cities. RESULTS: Most (63.8%) pharmacists had encountered patients who were using CAM. They documented CAM use in 9.8% of cases and monitored for drug-related problems in 39.4%. Among users, pharmacists sometimes to usually (3.4 ± 1.4 [mean ± SD]) took actions such as referring patients to their physicians. Pharmacists were not particularly comfortable (3.2 ± 1.0) with responding to CAM inquiries but believed patients needed adequate CAM knowledge. Pharmacists rarely to sometimes (2.6 ± 1.2) asked patients about their CAM use. Inquiry about CAM use was greater when information could be documented in profiles (F = 4.29, P = 0.02) and when pharmacists had additional training in CAM (t = -2.59, P = 0.01). Also, in pharmacies that stocked herbal or homeopathic products, pharmacists were more likely to recommend other CAM therapies appropriate for patients' conditions (t = -3.27, P < 0.01). CONCLUSION: Pharmacists were not very proactive in inquiring about CAM use, and their actions (e.g., referral to physician) were somewhat passive. More routine inquiry and documentation are needed. Pharmacists should routinely ask about and document CAM use by patients in order to optimize drug therapy outcomes. PMID: 21896460 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Common complementary and alternative therapies with potential use in dermatologic surgery: risks and benefits.

Related Articles Common complementary and alternative therapies with potential use in dermatologic surgery: risks and benefits. J Am Acad Dermatol. 2013 Apr;68(4):e127-35 Authors: Reddy KK, Grossman L, Rogers GS Abstract BACKGROUND: Ambulatory surgery patients often use complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) therapies. CAM therapies may create beneficial and detrimental perioperative conditions. OBJECTIVE: We sought to improve knowledge of CAM effects in dermatologic surgery, allowing dermatologists to potentially capitalize on therapeutic actions and to mitigate complications. METHODS: PubMed literature search of CAM therapies in dermatologic and surgical settings was performed. Common CAM therapies with possible effects on dermatologic surgery were selected. Beneficial and detri-mental effects were reviewed. RESULTS: A myriad of products may be used perioperatively by the patient. Therapies appearing to have some evidence for potential benefit include bromelain, honey, propolis, arnica, vitamin C and bioflavonoids, chamomile, aloe vera gel, grape seed extract, zinc, turmeric, calendula, chlorella, lavender oil, and gotu kola. Potential complications vary according to product and include platelet inhibition, contact dermatitis and, in rare cases, systemic toxicity. LIMITATIONS: This review focuses on CAM having significant published studies evaluating efficacy for wound healing, anti-inflammatory, antipurpuric, or perioperative-related use. Most published studies have been small and often have design flaws. The scope of CAM is large and not all therapies are discussed. CONCLUSION: Selected CAM therapies have been reported to promote wound healing, reduce edema or purpura, and provide anti-inflammatory effects. Because of high rates of CAM use, surgeons should familiarize themselves with common uses, potential benefits, and complications. Further study of effects in the dermatologic surgery setting may improve the patient-doctor relationship and enhance outcomes. PMID: 21890235 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

[Complementary practices, medical rationalities, and health promotion: some overlooked contributions].

Related Articles [Complementary practices, medical rationalities, and health promotion: some overlooked contributions]. Cad Saude Publica. 2009 Aug;25(8):1732-42 Authors: Tesser CD Abstract This article presents some key contributions to health promotion by complementary and alternative medicine (CAM). After contextualizing CAM, the article proposes a scheme for viewing the challenges and tensions in health promotion, organized along four thematic lines: (1) actions impacting the collective (social, collective 'empowerment') versus the individual; (2) inter-sector versus sectorial actions; (3) positive and expanded conception of health versus health as absence of disease; (4) directive versus dialogical pedagogy. The paper argues that the contributions of CAM to health promotion are oriented towards individuals and groups and to the sectorial pole of promotion; they are centered on positive conceptions of health, especially vitalist medical paradigms, including health-strengthening practices; and with 'empowering' pedagogical potential. The article highlights the relevance of these contributions, largely overlooked in the past, and the difficulties and guidelines for enabling them in Brazil, related to their non-scientific and poorly institutionalized configurations and their steady commodification. PMID: 19649414 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Learning activities to enhance research literacy in a CAM college curriculum.

Related Articles Learning activities to enhance research literacy in a CAM college curriculum. Altern Ther Health Med. 2009 Jul-Aug;15(4):46-54 Authors: Lasater K, Salanti S, Fleishman S, Coletto J, Jin H, Lore R, Hammerschlag R Abstract As complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) therapies become increasingly accepted healthcare options, it is of major importance for CAM institutions to enhance research literacy and an evidence-based perspective in their curricula. A research education program for students and faculty at the Oregon College of Oriental Medicine (OCOM), developed in collaboration with the Oregon Health & Science University School of Nursing, has been supported by an R25 award from the National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine (NCCAM). A key initiative of OCOM's grant is the design of learning activities that infuse a research perspective into nonresearch courses in both the traditional Chinese medicine and biomedicine curricula. This approach was pilot-tested in course sequences chosen from each of the 3 years of the master's degree program. Learner-centered activities included Infusing Evidence and Reflection Into Introductory Qigong Classes (Year 1: Qigong), Using Evidence to Inform Acupuncture Point Selection (Year 2: Point Actions and Indications), and Media and Research in Western Clinical Medicine (Year 3: Western Clinical Diagnosis). Among the lessons learned are the need to infuse learning activities into the curriculum in a manner that minimizes interactivity redundancy and reinforces learning, the importance for faculty to communicate to students the rationale for introducing the learning activities, and the value of creating a learning activity design template to guide faculty recognition of essential elements in design and evaluation and to provide sustainable overviews of the learning activities. PMID: 19623832 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM).

Related Articles Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM). Geriatr Nurs. 2009 May-Jun;30(3):196-203 Authors: Moquin B, Blackman MR, Mitty E, Flores S Abstract The use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) appears to be on the rise in all adult age groups, including the elderly population. Many herbal and biologic preparations offer promise, but they are largely of unproven benefit. The content(s) are unregulated by government agencies, such as the Food and Drug Administration, making their use problematic to recommend and guide. Use of CAM modalities in assisted living communities (ALCs) is by and large a hidden practice, but it is estimated that 5%-9% of residents ingest some kind of herbal remedy. Belief systems among residents and their families-for example, that a certain kind of tea is a cure for dementia-can be persuasive. Responsible for resident well-being, assisted living nurses are caught in the middle. Nurse licensure considers herbals as medications, yet physicians refuse to prescribe them, and nurses (or certified med techs) cannot administer them. In some states, "alternative practitioners" are not viewed as legal prescribers. Undaunted, residents (or their families) purchase alternative "medicines" that are contraindicated by their traditional medical regimen. Secreted in their room, nurses are unaware of the stash and the self-administrating practice. This article describes the state of the science regarding the efficacy and safety of CAM modalities and actions that ALC nurses might undertake to collaborate with residents to address their CAM interest and use respectfully. PMID: 19520231 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Informed consent in complementary and alternative medicine.

Related Articles Informed consent in complementary and alternative medicine. Evid Based Complement Alternat Med. 2011;2011:170793 Authors: Caspi O, Shalom T, Holexa J Abstract The objective of this study was to examine complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) practitioners' (i) attitudes toward informed consent and (ii) to assess whether standards of practice exist with respect to informed consent, and what these standards look like. The design and setting of the study constituted face-to-face qualitative interviews with 28 non-MD, community-based providers representing 11 different CAM therapeutic modalities. It was found that there is great deal of variability with respect to the informed consent process in CAM across providers and modalities. No unique profession-based patterns were identified. The content analysis yielded five major categories related to (i) general attitude towards the informed consent process, (ii) type and amount of information exchange during that process, (iii) disclosure of risks, (iv) discussions of alternatives, and (v) potential benefits. There is a widespread lack of standards with respect to the practice of informed consent across a broad range of CAM modalities. Addressing this problem requires concerted and systematic educational, ethical and judicial remedial actions. Informed consent, which is often viewed as a pervasive obligation is medicine, must be reshaped to have therapeutic value. Acknowledging current conceptions and misconception surrounding the practice of informed consent may help to bring about this change. More translational research is needed to guide this process. PMID: 19376838 [PubMed]

Actions speak louder than words: mainstream health providers' definitions and behaviour regarding complementary and alternative medicine.

Related Articles Actions speak louder than words: mainstream health providers' definitions and behaviour regarding complementary and alternative medicine. Complement Ther Clin Pract. 2007 Feb;13(1):29-37 Authors: Hirschkorn KA, Bourgeault IL Abstract The purpose of this paper is to explore how mainstream practitioners define and categorize complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) as one component of assessing their views. The following themes emerged from interviews with Canadian physicians, midwives and nurses: epistemological, evidence-based, medical domain, political-regulatory, funding-based, and role-based definitions of CAM. We also assess any possible links to their behaviour vis-à-vis CAM. We found that classifying something as CAM does not appear to inhibit most providers from recommending, referring for, or supporting their patients' use of these treatments. In conclusion, we highlight that despite their clear definitional boundaries around CAM, providers tend to evaluate each individual therapy on its own merits, taking other situational factors into consideration. PMID: 17210509 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Models for the study of whole systems.

Related Articles Models for the study of whole systems. Integr Cancer Ther. 2006 Dec;5(4):293-307 Authors: Bell IR, Koithan M Abstract This article summarizes a network and complex systems science model for research on whole systems of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) such as homeopathy and traditional Chinese medicine. The holistic concepts of networks and nonlinear dynamical complex systems are well matched to the global and interactive perspectives of whole systems of CAM, whereas the reductionistic science model is well matched to the isolated local organ, cell, and molecular mechanistic perspectives of pharmaceutically based biomedicine. Whole systems of CAM are not drugs with specific actions. The diagnostic and therapeutic approaches of whole systems of CAM produce effects that involve global and patterned shifts across multiple subsystems of the person as a whole. For homeopathy, several characteristics of complex systems, including the probabilistic nature of attractor patterns, variable sensitivity of complex systems to initial conditions, and emergent behaviors in the evolution of a system in its full environmental context over time, could help account for the mixed basic science and controlled clinical trial research findings, in contrast with the consistently positive outcomes of observational studies in the literature. Application of theories and methods from complex systems and network science can open a new era of advances in understanding factors that lead to good versus poor individual global outcome patterns and to rational triage of patients to one type of care over another. The growing reliance on complex systems thinking and systems biology for cancer research affords a unique opportunity to bridge between the CAM and conventional medical worlds with some common language and conceptual models. PMID: 17101758 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Communities' views on prerequisites for collaboration between modern and traditional health sectors in relation to STI/HIV/AIDS care in Zambia.

Related Articles Communities' views on prerequisites for collaboration between modern and traditional health sectors in relation to STI/HIV/AIDS care in Zambia. Health Policy. 2006 Oct;78(2-3):330-9 Authors: Kaboru BB, Falkenberg T, Ndulo J, Muchimba M, Solo K, Faxelid E, Bridging Gaps Project's Research Team Abstract Traditional, complementary and alternative medicine (TM/CAM) is globally increasing in popularity. The World Health Organization (WHO) has advocated for the integration of TM/CAM in national public health policies to enhance health care resources. Interest in collaboration between traditional and biomedical health sectors has been renewed in attempts to strengthen control of the AIDS epidemic. However, studies exploring communities' views on the prerequisites for such collaboration are inexistent. We conducted 21 focus group discussions with community members in two Zambian urban centres (Ndola and Kabwe) to explore their perspectives on preconditions for useful collaboration between traditional and modern health workers in the management of STIs and HIV/AIDS. This study shows that laypersons' perspectives can be rich and inform complex policy issues. Five categories indicating key areas of actions were identified, including protection of traditional medicine and of compensation of healers, education of both groups of providers and adequate community involvement. The respect for some degree of secrecy in traditional medicine was also called for. As part of efforts to strengthen available resources for better care of STI/HIV/AIDS, this study provides policymakers, researchers and practitioners with an outline of fundamentals in terms of needed crucial changes at health policy level, among providers and in the community for sustainable collaboration between modern and traditional health practitioners. PMID: 16290128 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Potential benefits of complementary medicine modalities in patients with chronic kidney disease.

Related Articles Potential benefits of complementary medicine modalities in patients with chronic kidney disease. Adv Chronic Kidney Dis. 2005 Jul;12(3):292-9 Authors: Markell MS Abstract Use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) by the general population is common, and, although potential for harm exists, evidence is accumulating that several modalities, including acupuncture, massage, relaxation response/guided or integrative imagery, meditation, and herbal supplements, have actions that are beneficial for patients with chronic illness. Potential areas in which CAM might benefit patients with kidney disease include prolonging time of progression to kidney failure as well as treatment of concomitant problems, including arthritides, pruritus, cardiovascular risk factors, anxiety, depression, and fatigue, as well as hepatoprotection and treatment of uremic bruising. Although no systematic survey of prevalence of use has been performed in patients with chronic kidney disease and much research remains to be done so that safety and efficacy issues can be resolved, it is likely that many patients are using the services of CAM providers without the knowledge of their nephrologists. Thus, it behooves us to become conversant in these therapies so that we may hold open dialogues with our patients, discouraging potentially harmful treatments, suggesting potentially helpful ones, and monitoring them for effects, both beneficial and harmful. PMID: 16010644 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Naturopaths practice behaviour: provision and access to information on complementary and alternative medicines.

Related Articles Naturopaths practice behaviour: provision and access to information on complementary and alternative medicines. BMC Complement Altern Med. 2005 Jul 11;5:15 Authors: Smith C, Martin K, Hotham E, Semple S, Bloustien G, Rao D Abstract BACKGROUND: The increasing use of complementary and alternative medicines in Australia has generated concern regarding the information on these products available to both healthcare providers and the public. The aim of this study was to examine the practice behaviours of naturopaths in relation to both the provision of and access to information on complementary and alternative medicines (CAM). METHODS: A representative sample of 300 practicing naturopaths located nationally were sent a comprehensive survey which gathered data on self reported practice behaviour in relation to the provision of information on oral CAM to clients and the information needs of the practitioners themselves. RESULTS: A response rate of 35% was achieved. Most practitioners (98%) have a dispensary within their clinic and the majority of practitioners perform the dispensing themselves. Practitioners reported they provided information to clients, usually in the form of verbal information (96%), handwritten notes (83%) and printed information (75%). The majority of practitioners (over 75%) reported always giving information on the full name of the product, reason for prescribing, expected response, possible interactions and contraindications and actions of the product. Information resources most often used by practitioners included professional newsletters, seminars run by manufacturers, patient feedback and personal observation of patients. Most practitioners were positive about the information they could access but felt that more information was required in areas such as adverse reactions and safe use of CAM in children, pregnancy and breastfeeding. Most naturopaths (over 96%) were informed about adverse events through manufacturer or distributor newsletters. The barriers in the provision of information to clients were misleading or incorrect information in the media, time constraints, information overload and complex language used in printed information. The main barrier to the practitioner in information access was seen as the perceived division between orthodox and complementary medicine practitioners. CONCLUSION: Our data suggest most naturopaths were concerned about possible interaction between pharmaceuticals and CAM, and explore this area with their patients. There is scope to improve practitioners' access to information of adverse events including an increased awareness of sources of information such as the Australian Therapeutic Goods Administration (TGA) website. PMID: 16004617 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Community pharmacists' actions when patients use complementary and alternative therapies with medications.

Related Articles Community pharmacists' actions when patients use complementary and alternative therapies with medications. J Am Pharm Assoc (2003). 2005 Jan-Feb;45(1):41-7 Authors: Brown CM, Barner JC, Shah S Abstract OBJECTIVE: To assess actions of community pharmacists in response to their patients' concurrent use of prescription medications and complementary and alternative medicine (CAM). DESIGN: Nonexperimental, cross-sectional mail survey. SETTING: Texas. PARTICIPANTS: 107 community pharmacists. INTERVENTIONS: Not applicable. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Pharmacists' self-reported rate of patient inquiry about CAM use and actions taken in response to CAM use. RESULTS: A majority (71.0%) of pharmacists had encountered patients who were using CAM, which was defined broadly in the survey to include herbal products, vitamins and minerals, homeopathic products, massage, meditation, and other types of CAM. Pharmacists documented CAM use by patients in 11.0% of cases and reported monitoring for drug-related problems in 38.4% of users. Among CAM users, pharmacists most often encouraged CAM use if medically appropriate. Pharmacists were not comfortable with responding to CAM inquiries but believed they needed adequate knowledge about CAM. In general, pharmacists rarely asked patients about their CAM use. Pharmacists' rate of inquiry about CAM use increased significantly when this information could be documented in patient profiles and when pharmacists had additional training in CAM. Also, in pharmacies that stocked herbal or homeopathic products, pharmacists were significantly more likely to encourage the use of CAM when medically appropriate and to recommend other CAM therapies appropriate for patients' conditions. When no references were available to research CAM, pharmacists tended to neither encourage nor discourage CAM use based on lack of scientific evidence of their effectiveness. CONCLUSION: Most community pharmacists had patients who used CAM, but they were not proactive in inquiring about or documenting this use. They most often encouraged CAM use if deemed medically appropriate. Pharmacists' actions differed on the basis of professional and practice setting characteristics. To ensure optimal drug therapy outcomes, pharmacists should be more proactive in identifying and documenting CAM use by patients. PMID: 15730116 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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