Cybermedlife - Therapeutic Actions Biodex Balance System


Balance training reduces fear of falling and improves dynamic balance and isometric strength in institutionalised older people: a randomised trial.

Abstract Title: Balance training reduces fear of falling and improves dynamic balance and isometric strength in institutionalised older people: a randomised trial. Abstract Source: J Physiother. 2012 ;58(2):97-104. PMID: 22613239 Abstract Author(s): Narcis Gusi, Jose Carmelo Adsuar, Hector Corzo, Borja Del Pozo-Cruz, Pedro R Olivares, Jose A Parraca Article Affiliation: Faculty of Sport Sciences, University of Extremadura, Spain. Abstract: QUESTION: What is the effect of a balance training protocol with the Biodex Balance System in institutionalised older people with fear of falling? DESIGN: Randomised controlled trial with concealed allocation and assessor blinding. PARTICIPANTS: Forty older people who lived in a nursing home and had fear of falling. INTERVENTION: The experimental group completed a 12-week balance training protocol based on balancing/rebalancing training with the Biodex Balance System, with two sessions per week. During the training period, participants in both groups received the same multidisciplinary care (such as physiotherapy, occupational therapy and nursing) that they usually received in the nursing home. OUTCOME MEASURES: The primary outcome was fear of falling (Falls Efficacy Scale International questionnaire). Secondary outcomes were dynamic balance (Fall Risk Test) and isometric strength (torque of knee flexor and extensor isometric strength measured with an isokinetic dynamometer). Outcome measures were taken before and after the training program protocol. RESULTS: Compared to the control group, the exercise group had significantly greater improvements at 12 weeks in fear of falling (by 8 points, 95% CI 4 to 12), in dynamic balance (by 2 degrees, 95% CI 1 to 3), and in isometric strength of the knee flexors (by 7Nm, 95% CI 3 to 11) and knee extensors (by 7Nm, 95% CI 1 to 13). CONCLUSION: The training program was feasible and effective in reducing fear of falling and improving dynamic balance and isometric strength in institutionalised older people with fear of falling. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ISRCTN21695765. Article Published Date : Dec 31, 2011
Therapeutic Actions Biodex Balance System

NCBI pubmed

THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN PRE-OPERATIVE AND TWELVE-WEEK POST-OPERATIVE Y-BALANCE AND QUADRICEPS STRENGTH IN ATHLETES WITH AN ANTERIOR CRUCIATE LIGAMENT TEAR.

Related Articles THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN PRE-OPERATIVE AND TWELVE-WEEK POST-OPERATIVE Y-BALANCE AND QUADRICEPS STRENGTH IN ATHLETES WITH AN ANTERIOR CRUCIATE LIGAMENT TEAR. Int J Sports Phys Ther. 2017 Nov;12(6):986-993 Authors: Hallagin C, Garrison JC, Creed K, Bothwell JM, Goto S, Hannon J Abstract Background: Pre-operative quadriceps strength may have a positive influence on post-operative function and outcomes at time of return to sport. Little consideration has been given to quadriceps strength during the early post-operative timeframes. Twelve-week post-operative anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACL-R) is considered a critical time point for progression in the rehabilitation process. There is currently limited research looking at the relationship between clinical measurements pre-operatively and at 12-weeks following ACL-R. Purpose/Hypothesis: The primary purpose of this study was to examine the differences between Y-Balance Test Lower Quarter (YBT-LQ) and isokinetic quadriceps strength tested pre-operatively and post-operatively following ACL-R (12-weeks). Study Design: Within subject, repeated measures. Methods: Thirty-nine participants (15.6 ± 1.5 y/o) were diagnosed with an ACL tear and were undergoing rehabilitation to return to a sport requiring cutting and pivoting were included. YBT-LQ and isokinetic quadriceps strength were assessed pre-operatively and at 12-weeks after ACL-R. YBT-LQ composite scores were calculated bilaterally and isokinetic quadriceps strength was tested using the Biodex Multi-Joint Testing and Rehabilitation System. Paired T-tests were used to determine mean group differences between YBT-LQ and isokinetic quadriceps strength scores pre-operatively and at 12-weeks post-operative. A Pearson Correlation was performed to determine relationships between variables at both time points. Results: There was a significant improvement in YBT-LQ composite scores from pre-operative to 12-weeks post-operative on both the involved (Pre-operative: 89.0 ± 7.7; 12-weeks: 94.1 ± 7.1, p<0.001) and uninvolved (Pre-operative: 92.6 ± 6.2; 12-weeks: 97.6 ± 6.8, p<0.001) limbs. Quadriceps strength decreased significantly from pre-operative to 12-weeks on the involved limb (Pre-operative: 82.3 ftlbs ± 38.6; 12-weeks: 67.9 ftlbs±27.4, p<0.01), but no differences were found on the uninvolved limb (Pre-operative: 117.3ftlbs ± 42.0; 12-weeks: 121.7ftlbs ± 41.5, p = 0.226). Conclusions: Involved limb quadriceps strength decreases from time of pre-operative to 12-weeks following ACL-R. Level of Evidence: 3. PMID: 29158959 [PubMed]

STATIC BALANCE MEASUREMENTS IN STABLE AND UNSTABLE CONDITIONS DO NOT DISCRIMINATE GROUPS OF YOUNG ADULTS ASSESSED BY THE FUNCTIONAL MOVEMENT SCREEN™ (FMS™).

Related Articles STATIC BALANCE MEASUREMENTS IN STABLE AND UNSTABLE CONDITIONS DO NOT DISCRIMINATE GROUPS OF YOUNG ADULTS ASSESSED BY THE FUNCTIONAL MOVEMENT SCREEN™ (FMS™). Int J Sports Phys Ther. 2017 Nov;12(6):858-861 Authors: Trindade MA, de Toledo AM, Cardoso JR, Souza IE, Dos Santos Mendes FA, Santana LA, Carregaro RL Abstract Background: The Functional Movement Screen™ (FMS™) has been the focus of recent research related to movement profiling and injury prediction. However, there is a paucity of studies examining the associations between physical performance tasks such as balance and the FMS™ screening system. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to compare measures of static balance in stable and unstable conditions between different groups divided by FMS™ scores. A secondary purpose was to discern if balance indices discriminate the groups divided by FMS™ scores. Study Design: Cross-sectional study. Methods: Fifty-seven physically active subjects (25 men and 32 women; mean age of 22.9 ± 3.1 yrs) participated. The outcome was unilateral stance balance indices, composed by: Anteroposterior Index; Medial-lateral Index, and Overall Balance Index in stable and unstable conditions, as provided by the Biodex balance platform. Subjects were dichotomized into two groups, according to a FMS™ cut-off score of 14: FMS1 (score > 14) and FMS2 (score ≤ 14). The independent Students t-test was used to verify differences in balance indices between FMS1 and FMS2 groups. A discriminant analysis was applied in order to identify which of the balance indices would adequately discriminate the FMS™ groups. Results: Comparisons between FMS1 and FMS2 groups in the stable and unstable conditions demonstrated a higher unstable Anteroposterior index for FMS2 (p=0.017). No significant differences were found for other comparisons (p>0.05). The indices did not discriminate the FMS™ groups (p > 0.05). Conclusions: The balance indices adopted in this study were not useful as a parameter for identification and discrimination of healthy subjects assessed by the FMS™. Level of evidence: 2c. PMID: 29158947 [PubMed]